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Discussion Starter #1
How many people here belong to food cooperatives?

I'd been sent the info for one and an invitation to join months ago, but only just now joined.

Great way to support your local farmers, including your local small meat and poultry producers. And given how convinced I am that Tyson's is The Spawn of Satan :D , it only makes sense I put my money where my mouth is and start going directly to the producer.

If you have a local cooperative which puts you in direct contact with producers, I say join! And if you're a producer and don't make your goods available through such cooperatives, think about changing your mind about that! :)
 

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I buy prodcuts from a co-op called Blooming Prairie thru a local family owned natural food store. The family orders, recieves, splits and delivers the products. I just love them. The best part is that they carry so many products that the co-op doesn't. Like my wheat. They buy it directly from a production company in Montana. They buy honey from a local bee keeper in quantities large enough to pass the savings on to us. I can get a gallon for about $22.00 which for around here is very good. Plus it is wild flower and raw. We do not have a source for meat, eggs or milk thru them, but there is a local woman who sells raw milk and farm fresh eggs. I have chickens so I do not need the eggs, but I am thinking of buyng the milk. I love being able to buy products from local farmers not only am I helping the local economy but I am getting superior products at better prices too. Love it.
God bless you and yours
Debbie
 

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When we lived in WI I belonged to the Co-op through North Farms which has since folded from what I've heard.
Now that I'm in KY I belong to Morningside Farms out of Liberty, TN. They are celebrating their 20th year of providing healthy,clean foods to now over 700 families.
They will ship for those interested in joining but who live to far to pick up their orders. Their website & online catalog is www.morningsidefarm.com
 

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KYGuest: Thank you for posting that link! I have been trying to find a food co-op in my area, but don't believe we have one. I was actually thinking about starting the research to start one...but I have no idea WHERE to start. At least there is one that will ship to me in NW TN. Thanks again and Happy Holidays!
Heather
 

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I go to a local co-op market. You don't have to be a member, but you get a bigger discount if you are. They carry a lot of local small farm produce. Before I cranked up the garden I used to belong to a CSA. My two complaints were - arranging pick-up and sometimes having way too much of one thing (I discovered you cannot even give kale or turnips away).

I also know a number of small producers that I network and barter with. I barter plants (we have a nursery) with a friend who makes goat cheese and another neighbor who imports organic olive oil etc... I also do not buy when the label says Tyson, General Mills, Perdue, Swanson, "imported from Chile", Jimmy Dean, Campbells, Coca-Cola - gosh this list could go on for pages and pages, but I'll stop here.
 

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I belong to the Viroqua Food Coop. They carry produce and meat from local producers and a lot of organic food (Blooming Prairie is one of the suppliers). I work full time and therefore can't always make my own bread, but thanks to the food coop I can at least buy real bread that has some substance to it! I don't have my own laying chickens (yet), but I can buy fresh local eggs (hens fed organic grain) sold at our coop. And of course there is Organic Valley milk (Organic Valley is a very sucessful dairy coop headquartered here in LaFarge).

I know that I probably pay more for my groceries by buying organic but I feel better knowing that I am supporting my community and getting quality food.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm a strong proponent of local economies, so I'm pretty embarrassed it took me so long to join our local coop. I was sent all the info months ago, and have kept it handy on email so I could just do it. But other things kept getting in the way. :rolleyes:

I'm excited, though, esp. when it comes to local meats and eggs. I've seen how various people around here raise their critters and I'd absolutely trust buying from them.

And it sure beats Tyson's crap :bleeegh: :no: :no: :no:
 

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countrygrrrl said:
And it sure beats Tyson's crap :bleeegh: :no: :no: :no:
Does anyone have a link for Tyson's meat? I'd love to read up on why they are so bad. I'm so thankfull that we can raise our own meat :D
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Last night, I ran some searches on Tyson's and other stuff, and came up with lots of things and was merrily posting them to this thread ... when Explorer crashed and took my reply and everything else with it.

And people wonder about the GRRRRR in ... :)

In any case, I don't have time now to replicate the searches but here's a short list for you Becca.

First, the State of Oklahoma is suing the state of Arkansas because of the damage being done to the Illinois River by poultry producers (read: TYSON and its contract producers). This has been going on for some years now, and in the latest twist, Arkansas govt officials have simply stopped going to proceedings - in other words, they are unable to defend Tyson so are simply not participating in order to protect Tyson.

I live quite close to the Arkansas border and to the Illinois River, and I know I've been warned that my well is most likely unusable because of contamination from Tyson, meaning that now the groundwater is polluted by their practices.

There were numerous articles about charges brought against Tyson for unsantary practices and conditions, as well. I can testify to that - I've seen some of their contract growers and it really does not matter how ethical its employees might be or how much they might know about raising the critters - their knowledge is not being put to use.

Etc etc. I stopped buying their products some time ago before I really became aware of who they were and what they're about. So my stopping really had nothing to do with *them* at the time. I stopped because their product is truly disgusting and kind of scary - lots of buggy stuff, lots of not good stuff in it.

Bad practice, in other words. :no:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
More Tyson. once again groundwater issues this time in Missouri:

From US Water News archives, http://www.uswaternews.com/archives/arcrights/3tysple7.html

Tyson pleads guilty to violating Clean Water Act
July 2003

U.S. Water News Online

KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- After years of continuing violations, Tyson Foods Inc. has pleaded guilty to 20 federal violations of the Clean Water Act at its Sedalia chicken poultry complex.

The company, the nation's largest meat producer, agreed to pay a $5.5 million fine to the federal government, $1 million to the Missouri Natural Resources Protection Fund and another $1 million to the state to settle a separate civil enforcement action.

The Springdale, Ark.-based company also will be on probation for three years, will hire an independent consultant to perform an environmental audit and will implement an improved environmental management program.

In the plea agreement, the company admitted that between September 1998 and March 2001 it repeatedly discharged untreated wastewater from its poultry plant into a tributary that empties into the Lamine River. It also acknowledged that employees at the plant knew about the discharges.

The company's state permit, issued under the federal Clean Water Act, requires Tyson to treat the wastewater before discharging it into the stream.

>snip<

State and federal prosecutors alleged that over the last decade Tyson repeatedly ignored civil fines, state orders and other violation notices about its wastewater discharges. The violations continued even after the FBI and the Environmental Protection Agency executed search warrants at the plant in 1999, said Jeremy Korzenik, attorney for the U.S. Department of Justice's environmental crimes section.

The company repeatedly blamed the problems on inattentive employees or innocent mistakes, Korzenik said. But internal Tyson documents showed that managers ``at the highest levels'' knew about the violations, he said.

``The government is not making crimes out of innocent mistakes,'' Korzenik said. ``Tyson's violations were not limited to incidents of innocent errors.''

He said no individuals were charged because the responsibility for the violations was widespread throughout the company.

In accepting the agreement, Sachs said the government had convinced him that Tyson continued to violate the clean water regulations despite knowing of problems at its wastewater and rendering plants.

He said the fine was ``less than impressive'' because of Tyson's size and history of violations. But he accepted the deal to end the lengthy case and because the company had agreed to be monitored by an outside auditor.

>snip<
 
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