Flourescent vs. LED which one???

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by seedspreader, Oct 7, 2005.

  1. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    All right, all you electrical geniuses...
    LED or Flourescent...

    Which is more economical electric wise for the "candlepower" they put out?

    I was thinking of making a small step toward solar by putting lights in the the chicken coop. With the purpose of giving me knowlege and experience in solar systems (small to begin with)
     
  2. Jim-mi

    Jim-mi Well-Known Member

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    LED's
    downside..bigger up front cost

    ..............BUT far offset by much much less electrical needs
    .........and a very long life.
     

  3. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    What about light quantity/quality?
     
  4. Don Armstrong

    Don Armstrong In Remembrance

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    No question - fluorescent! Others may say otherwise, but if they do they don't know what they're talking about - REALLY!

    LEDs are only about as efficient, power-to-light, as incandescent (hot wire). The fake tests that seemed to show LEDs as efficient were, in fact, looking at how much power it took to put a given amount of light on a given area. LEDs are, in fact, very efficient as spot-lights. They were measuring spot-light in it's area of directed light versus distributed light from a fluorescent, a little bit of the broad distributed globe of light in the same area as the spot of light from the LED.

    So... compact fluorescent is best. LED's are about as bad as hot-wire incandescent, but work well for a limited amount of light in a limited area.
     
  5. Explorer

    Explorer Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Lighting systems using incandescent bulbs are cheap to buy but inefficient, generating from about 16 lumens per watt for a domestic tungsten bulb to 22 lm/W for a halogen bulb. Fluorescent tubes are more efficient, from 50 to 100 lm/W for domestic tubes (average 60lm/W), allowing large energy savings, but are bulky and fragile and require starter circuits. LEDs are robust and moderately efficient, up to 80 lumens per watt (but the average commercial LED outputs 32 lm/W). Thus LEDs are expensive, although their cost is falling. The technologies for LED production are developing rapidly.
     
  6. WanderingOak

    WanderingOak Well-Known Member

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    One thing about LED lights is that they are available for automotive applications. Look in any auto parts store, and they will be with the truck tail-lights. You can replace the red tail-light lens with something else. Since they are available in 12v DC, they will work off of a solar-charged battery bank without an inverter. Also, I know that CF lights are not the most robust lights in the world. They have a tendancy to act up when they are cold, and they will not work properly on timed, motion sensor or photocell circuits. CF lights also do not like rapid cycling -you are supposed to keep them on for five minutes before turning them back off again. I do preffer CF lights over incandescants, but they do have their drawbacks. The LED lights may not be quite as efficent as CF lights, but they might be better suited for a solar powered chicken coop.
     
  7. Gary in ohio

    Gary in ohio Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I am hoping that by "Flourescent" you mean compact Flourescents. The LED are EXPENSIVE and most that I have seen are "spot" lights, They have a beam pattern and would not make a good generic replacement for a floor lamp.
    compact Flourescents are bright, use less power than incandecants, but cost a little bit more. In the long run will work out costing less but it takes several years to recope the savings.

    Our Church has been replacing "exit" sign bulbs with compact Flourescents.
    The exit two exit lights on 24x7 would only last a couple of months then die, The compact Flourescents so far have lasted over a year and claim 5 years of life. Even at a year they are cheaper than incadacent in our application. As the guy who gets to replace them, I prefer once every year or so over every couple of months.
     
  8. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    Mine work fine outdoors on the motion sensor,its low 40s right now and they light right up.One bulb wont light when it hits freezing.

    I would think LED would be a good chicken coop light.Dont you just need a little light for coops?Search long and hard,there are some LEDs in the 15-20 dollar range.My little 4 battery d cell flashlight,i think 7-9 bulbs(its not here) throws out about half the light of a regular flashlight.Sure should be chicken coop friendly with that amt. of light.Bear in mind,i only know what Ive read here about chickens,my chick knowledge is zilch.

    BooBoo
     
  9. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    If they are half way decent they should do 5 years.I have a couple 11 watters on 24/7 that are well past 5 years(off brand BTW,most failed early on),my GE bulbs are going on 5 years,tho weve replaced a couple.Only a couple years on my small 15 watt FEIT bulbs,but boy are they bright!These seem to be very nice bulbs.

    BooBoo
     
  10. blufford

    blufford Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Which one of these lights are what they call the "energy star lights" It seems our governor would like us to begin using the energy star lights to save energy. Is it a single type of bulb?
     
  11. WanderingOak

    WanderingOak Well-Known Member

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    All I know is that most CF bulbs have several disclaimers on the package saying not to use them on timed, photoelectric, or motion sensor controled circuits. I read somewhere that it is due to the balast not working properly when switched on by a digital circuit. Perhaps it could be that the bulb could be subjected to rapid cycling which is supposed to kill CF bulbs quickly. I know my kitchen lights start up slow when it is cold out.
     
  12. Grandmotherbear

    Grandmotherbear Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I am going to utilize both.
    The LEDs are going into the night lights and the overbed reading lamps.
    The CFs everywhere else.
    I did find bulb shaped CFs at many online retailers- good because many of our lamps have the shade-clip on the bulb arrangements. Couldn't use those with spirals.
     
  13. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    My house (grid connected energy beast that it is :)) is 90% CF and will be 100% soon. You just can't beat buying them at sams club. a 6 pack of 13W for 20 bucks.
     
  14. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    I heard not for motion sensors because of the split second time delay before they light up.Not sure thats the answer,but they do work ok for me,FWIW.Seem to be lasting ok too.Not as long as indoor ones though.

    What the heck,at a buck a bulb seems to work ok in the cost aspect,in my case anyhow.

    The GE bulbs are doing very well.I would guess Im getting about three years out of them.Im going to start dating them from now on so I can answer accurately.I have been replacing the older Lights of America bulbs with the GE that I got a big supply of.

    Anyone else use them outdoors?Ive seen that warning too,but mine are under eaves and dont get wet,we get rain and fog and they have worked.

    And cant beat using 52 watts instead of 200 watt incandescents(2 bulbs per fixture). :dance:

    BooBoo
     
  15. Kenneth in NC

    Kenneth in NC Well-Known Member

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    I have a 9V LED that stays on 24/7 I change out batteries every six months. It has 3 levels of light always on (very soft) low and high. (also has a emergency strobe function) it's been on for 5 years and still working.


    Kenneth in NC
     
  16. WanderingOak

    WanderingOak Well-Known Member

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    Where do you get them for that price? That is about 1/4 what I am paying, even at Costco.
     
  17. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    SoCal Edison pays a buydown,so the instant in store rebate applies.Every so often they show up on store shelves with the markdown tags and work out to a dollar,or 1.50 per bulb.
    When that happens I stock up.Got my 26 watt GE bulbs first,then found the 15 watt FEIT bulbs.
    I probably have 15 of each in the closet,never know when that program will end.
    Is that a super deal or what?

    Mrs thinks Im crazy with all my lightbulbs,LOL :p

    BTW,if we ever move Im taking my lightbulbs with me(and the rose bushes but thats another story)

    BooBoo
     
  18. Triffin

    Triffin Well-Known Member

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    Local prices for CFLs in Connecticut ..

    Costco is selling an 8 pack of 13w CFLs
    equivalent to a 60w incandescent for $4.00
    ie $0.50 per bulb :) :)

    RiteAid selling "Greenlite" brand 13w CFL
    for $1.00 per bulb

    Triff ..
     
  19. YuccaFlatsRanch

    YuccaFlatsRanch Well-Known Member Supporter

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    My solution for both my hen house and for my sheep barn and soon for my cow/steer shed is a solar LED. I bought a package of the solar walk way lights and took off the top part that has the solar cell and the white LED light. I cut a small hole in the roof for the LED light to stick through and used silicone seal to "cement" the top to the top of the building. Instant light every night that regenerates daily. At this time of the year you should be able to get them cheap.
     
  20. Kenneth in NC

    Kenneth in NC Well-Known Member

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    NOW that is the way to go. :cowboy:


    Kenneth in NC