Floppy kid syndrome?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by happyladybug, Jan 4, 2006.

  1. happyladybug

    happyladybug Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    107
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2005
    Location:
    northern minnesota
    could somebody tell me what floppy kid syndrome is and what causes it??
     
  2. goatkid

    goatkid Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,133
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2005
    Location:
    Montana
    According to my goat book, Floppy kid syndrome is related to the quality of a goat's colostrum and produces acidosis, so the kid is treated with baking soda. This is dissolved in warm water and given orally by syringe - carefully, so you don't choke the baby. A single shot of Biomycin is also given. We have also ginen these kids Pepto Bismo. In a kid with floppy, it will stagger and have problems with the back legs. They seem to respond within a day to treatment.
     

  3. crazygoatgirl

    crazygoatgirl Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    155
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2004
    Location:
    N. Central Arkansas
    According to the area that you live in you would also want to consider giving the kid a shot of Bo-Se and I always give vit B Complex when treating floppy kid syndrome.
     
  4. goatkid

    goatkid Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,133
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2005
    Location:
    Montana
    Bo Se is for white muscle disease, but the symptoms are alot alike, so in our area, we treat with Bo Se, too.
     
  5. happyladybug

    happyladybug Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    107
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2005
    Location:
    northern minnesota
    Thank you.. i have not had any kidding on my farm yet.. just started with
    three goats - two female pygmy (6 months old now) and one 3 yr old
    nubian that we call Nanny. I was hoping to breed Nanny for kids in the spring.. May send her to a farm soon, but not sure..
    I'm looking forward to making butter and yogurt and all that fun stuff..
     
  6. Sweet Goats

    Sweet Goats Cashmere goats

    Messages:
    2,023
    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2005
    Location:
    CO
    HappyLadyBug,
    I looked up in my infovets manual about floppy kid syndrome (FKS). Here is what it says.
    Introduction/causative Agent: FKS is an emerging diseases of young kid goats. The actual causative agent for tis syndrome has not been determined; however, this problem is always associated with metabolic ACIDOSIS(an abnormally low pH throughout the body). Some type of gastrointestinal disease is strongly suspected to be the cause for this syndrome.
    CLINICAL SIGNS: Affected kids are normal at birth. By 3-10 days of age, signs of weakness that can involve the entire body came on suddenly. Kids may cough, drool, and have a distended abdomen. Most animals die within 24-36 hours after the symptoms begin. The signs that are normally associated with metabolic acidosis such as diarrhea, dehydration, or difficulty breathing (dyspnea) are not observed. consider the following information before assuming FKS is the problem:

    * Has the kid become dehydrated because of diarrhea? FKS does not cause diarrhea, yet dehydration can cause signs that may look like FKS.
    * Was the kid normal at birth? FKS does not strike until the kid is 3-10 days of age. If the kid is born weak, white muscle disease should be considered.

    DIAGNOSIS: The problem is diagnosed based on clinical signs and blood chemistry (metabolic acidosis, decreased bicarbonate, normal to increased chloride, and occasionally, low potassium) findings.

    Problems such as white muscle disease, abomasal bloat, colibacillosis, septicemia, or enterotoxemia can also cause a young kid to be LETHARGIC and week. Because of this, special care should be taken to avoid misdiagnosing a case of FKS. To help avoid misdiagnosis, it is highly recommended to submit any sudden-death cases for nacrapsy in order to aid in the determination of the exact cause.

    TREATMENT: Early detection and correction of the metabolic acidosis is essential. This can aften be accomplished in more mild cases by administering oral baking soda (1/2 tsp. in cold water) when signs are first noticed. More severe cases need to be treated with isotonic intravenous (IV) 1.3% sodium bicarbonate solution. Supportive care (oral fluids, shelter, and heat) is also critical. Some kids may need to be fed milk by a stomach tube due o their reluctance to suckle. If FKS is the problem, dramatic improvement is noted after giving the bicarbonate (within 2 hours).

    Studies indicate that the administration of antibiotics or vitamin/mineral supplements do not seem to improve the results. Futhermore, recovery without treatment can occure in some severely affected cases. Because of these observations, treatment with antidiocics and other minerals or vitamins is NOT recommended at this time. Some animals may take up to 4 to 6 weeks to fully recover. relapses have also been reported.

    This is NOT my opinion it is from a vets printout that I have, so if you disagree please don't yell at me. I thought I would share this information with you.
    I hope this helps.