Flooring Options

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by conscious, Apr 12, 2006.

  1. conscious

    conscious Paul in Indiana

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    NW Indiana
    Good afternoon,

    I would like to know what people who are environmentally conscious are using for floors/floor covering and why. I would love to just use 2 by rough sawn pine planks over my floor joists but there are no local saw mills in the area. I just found some solid oak flooring at a local building supply on clearance for $1.60/sq. ft. and am seriously thinking about using it over OSB in the whole house except bath. People have been warning me against putting it in the kitchen though. Any feedback is appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Paul
     
  2. sullen

    sullen Question Answerer

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    Cork is very emvironmentally concious, they just peel it off and it grows back in a few years. Or Bamboo, it grows back really fast.
     

  3. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    Vancouver, and Moberly Lake, BC, Canada
    Our floors are 2 x 8 and 2 x 6 rough Pine (previously dryed or fire-killed -- not sure which.) The neighbors, the Gonvick brothers and father, sawed them and sold them to us 34 years ago for $200. I put tar inbetween (from a tube at Home Hardware), sanded them with a belt sanded and put 8 coats of marine varnish on them. That's for 560 ft2 on the first floor and 250 ft2 of the second floor.

    [​IMG]
    Floors today. To keep up you sweep up the dirt, mop, and take off your shoes -- that's all there is to it. Right in the front of the picture is one of Nancy's beautiful braided wool rugs made from old wool blankets -- we've got lots of 'em all over the cabin -- the floors make them stand out.

    Good Luck,

    Alex

    BTW We have wood every where except the bathroom, there we have 4 x 4 tile. And under Katie the Cookstove we have 4 x 4 tile (which you can see in the picture -- under the water bottle) and under Blaze King wood stove (to the upper left in the picture) we have 12 x 12 tile.
     
  4. fricknfarm

    fricknfarm Well-Known Member

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    Alex,
    Your home is lovely. Woderful front door too! it's easy to see you have a handcrafted home, it must give you a great deal of pleasure. I salute your fortitude, it couldn't have been easy! And Nancy's rug is beautiful!
     
  5. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    fricknfarm

    Thanks. To keep to the thread, the door in the other picture is the south-back door. The one in this picture is the front, it is made of the same rough Pine as the floor -- only NOT sanded, just varnished, with an inner layer of tar paper and an outer layer of the pine.

    [​IMG]
    Front door, with date carved overhead, A.B. 1973. The T&G pine to the right is the coat and electrical closet.

    Sorry about the picture quality, my old camera was not working well at that time. Guess I need to get some varnish on the coat closet, ceiling and logs near the door . . . OH well.

    Thanks, get that Pine, or Oak (WOW)

    Alex

    OH, fricknfarm, it was more than easy. When you love doing something that's the way it is -- it is perfect and easy. Time flys, or stands still, or something poetic and wonderful. And still there are some who would be driven nuts by my idea of level and lack of attention to detail.
     
  6. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    Here's the "environmentally conscious" floor in our place. It's made of recycled boards from old tobacco barns.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  7. WisJim

    WisJim Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I like hardwood flooring, such as maple or oak. We put oak throughout our first house, except for ceramic tile or slate under the heating stove, by entrances, etc., and loved it. Even had it in the kitchen with no problem. Our current house is an old farmhouse that we have been working on for years. All the first floor flooring is now oak, as the old flooring was either pine in rough shape or oak in terrible shape. The old oak had fir damage, water damage, and then had linoleum glued to it decades ago with some kind of super black tarry glue that we couldn't scrape, sand, or get off with solvents. The end result is that we tore up the old oak and put down new. We actually bought our own flooring nailer years ago because it save us rental cost over the years.
    We also put oak in our newly remodeled kitchen. My wife didn't want hard ceramic tile where dishes might fall, and vinyl or similar materials don't last long enough.

    I have a good stack of nice maple flooring from a torn down house that is waiting for me to build my "next" house.
     
  8. Jennifer Brewer

    Jennifer Brewer Jennifer

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    we will be building a new house, and we're going to have a slab on grade foundation. We'll use radiant heat flooring i think, and i want the floors to be the concrete slab, but stained.

    the radiant heat is hot water pipes laid through the concrete, whichgets it nice and toasty, then the thermal mass of the concrete releases the heat evenly all day. we're also designing the house lay out so that it takes advantage of passive solar design, again taking advantage of the thermal mass of the concrete floors.

    http://www.concretenetwork.com/concrete/interiorfloors/index.html

    i lke the look of the concrete stained the coppery color, i think it looks kind of like old leather.
     
  9. Ramblin Wreck

    Ramblin Wreck Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Depending upon the quality, the oak price you quoted in your thread sounds very reasonable. I used red oak in about half the house, including the kitchen, and it has worked out well so far. The baths and laundry/mud room are ceramic tile. For the hearth, I used flat rock. The suggestion from Alex about removing your shoes really helps to keep the floors looking good...plus its fun to slide around on wood floors in your socks. Best of luck in whatever you choose to do.