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Looking for help getting rid of fleas. We have bombed, put stuff in the carpet, sprayed from a bottle of hartz flea killer and the little devils are still around. Strange thing is the cat doesn't seem to have them anymore after frontline. Natural repelants would be great as kids are always around.
 

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jwcinpk said:
Looking for help getting rid of fleas. We have bombed, put stuff in the carpet, sprayed from a bottle of hartz flea killer and the little devils are still around. Strange thing is the cat doesn't seem to have them anymore after frontline. Natural repelants would be great as kids are always around.

We use a product called cedarcide... it comes in liquid, granual and powder... we use in on the carpet, directly on the dogs, on us, etc.. its all natural and it works, the only thing it doesnt keep away is the mosquitos.. but for fleas, there is nothing better.

We buy it at the pet store, but we have bought it at the grocery store as well as one of the farmers markets and feed and seed.

Lynn in Texas
 

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Place a nightlight about 16 inches above a wide pan of water, add a bit of dish soap, count the fleas in the morning. They will be floating, legs up, with little x's where their eyes should be. ;)
 

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one friend put a nightlight above a bowl of water (maybe with dish soap in it?) and left it on at night. the fleas jumped at the light and fell in the water. they also walked around with tape on their legs to catch the fleas when they jumped on, but claimed the light thing worked well.
 

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Religiously use Frontline. It will break the lifecycle of the flea. It's a war to be won, one battle at a time. Zodiac spray is the best to use on the areas where the pets sleep. Zodiac makes a bomb that is wonderful. It will rid your house of all pests, including mice. Take out all your kids and pets and keep them away for as long as you possibly can. Use the yard spray by Adams. Hook it up to your garden hose and spray all the mulched areas where the pets play. Of course, guineas or peafowl will eat the fleas outside. Stop feeding squirrels near the house, they'll keep the life cycle going.

Again, use Frontline religiously. It will kill every flea and tick on the pet within 24 hours and it will have residual effect for 30 days. Use it every month, all year long. Adult fleas need a "blood feed" every 3 hours to stay alive. If they bite a pet with frontline, they'll die. We've used Avon Skin So Soft to keep them off of us while we wait for all the adults to jump onto the cat and bite him so they'll die.
 

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southerngurl said:
I've been told their worst enemy is a vacuum cleaner. Unfortunately it is mine also. :haha: Anyway, if you vacuum your carpets, couches ect. it is supposed to get rid of most all of them.
Put some pieces of cut up flea collars in the vacuum bag. It's one of the few good uses for the things. (The only other good use I know of for a flea collar is to send to soldiers in the Middle East to put around their ankles to keep "nasties" from crawling up their legs.)

Garlic is a great natural deterent as is catnip. Your local petstore should have some catnip extract in a spray. Use this on the children. It's great at repelling all kinds of insects. We spray it on our son to keep the mosquitos off him while he's outside.
 

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It may not be practical to catch a flea and identify it, but it may solve your problem. There are different kinds of fleas with different kinds of preferred hosts. For example, a squirrel flea wont attack your pets as much as you and the squirrels; and, a human flea loves skunks and people. Cat fleas are the most common on pets. Cats complicate flea treatments because of their secretive nature. They have hiding places you may not know about that need to be treated. Bombs are not very effective at getting to these secret places. The bombs are also only effective as long as you can smell them. The business about fleas needing a blood meal every 3 hours is balogna. Also, no aerosol product will eliminate mice; however, mice could easily be a secondary host that could maintain the flea population. The same with rabbits and squirrels and..... If your cats are outdoor cats, they may be visiting a flea infested animal burrow and be bringing fresh fleas home. Based on your detail, you have treated the house and the cats (I assume thoroughly) and still have the problem, so, there is something else supporting the flea population. The flea is an insect with four life stages. Only the adult depends on and feeds on the blood host. The adult is the only stage effected by most sprays and bombs. They can go weeks or months without a host and still survive. The reason the carpets and floor cracks are treated is because the other three life stages live there. Vacuuming stimulates hatching of the pupae into adults and improves the action of applied chemicals. Since I am an exterminator, I may be able to give you more information, but you need to give me more information. It would be helpful to know more about the environment around the house, the condition of the house, and what other animals are around the house. There is no doubt if the animals in the house spend time outside, the problem is bigger than the house.
GObug
 

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Try Borax on the carpet, leave it for 24 hours then vaccum, put a couple of moth balls in the vaccum, when you are done , get rid of the bag, do this every seven days for 3 or 4 weeks. Frontline for your critters.


Trisha
 

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Frontline or K9 Advantix to start. Then listen to gobug. !!!

I read a great article about boric acid and Borax, BTW. It was about Borax abuse. !!! The article talked about how boric acid and Borax are very useful BUT they shouldn't be thrown around willy nilly all over the place. And it explained why.

It was by a pest dude, like gobug. I'll see if I can find it again.
 

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Okay. Found the article. And given diatomaceous earth works similarly to boric acid, I'd make a guess the same might be true for it. ! Remember that, just because something is *natural* doesn't mean it doesn't have hazards of its own. !

Note: I edited it down because my sinuses hurt so I didn't edit it down last night.

From here:

Opinion & Information on Boric Acid
By Michael R. Cartwright, Sr.

Over the past years I have seen, in many homes and restaurants, boric acid covering everything. Carpets, floors, toys and furniture, in kitchen cabinets, on counter tops and tables, in refrigerators, clothing, etc. Why? Because environmentalists, helped by an uninformed news media, tell them to. Why don't the news media also explain the possible dangers of applying something not normally found in the home environment, that you or your animals will come in direct contact with?

>snip<

Under an OSHA Hazard Communication Standard, based on animal chronic toxicity studies of inorganic borate chemicals, boric acid and/or borates are Hazardous Materials. California has identified boric acid as a hazardous waste. The above information is taken from Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) 25-80-2320 (Section 2 and 13) supplied by U.S. Borax Inc. (the major supplier of borax to many industries).

The National Academy of Sciences reports that children may be uniquely sensitive to chemicals and pesticide residues because of their rapid tissue growth and development. Most laboratory tests are performed on fully grown adult laboratory animals.

On page 312 of the National Academy of Sciences' report Pesticides in the Diets of Infants and Children (under the section entitled "Non-dietary Exposure to Pesticides") boric acid is cited as one of the pesticides/fungicides that can induce adverse skin reactions such as contact dermatitis and hyperkeratosis with dermal contact of treated surfaces.

Boric acid and/or borates are important and promising pesticides and fungicides, for my industry as well as for the general homeowner, for the control of fungus, termites, roaches and other insects as well as a wood preservative. Using appropriate application methods, boric acid and/or borates can be safe and long lasting pesticides and fungicides without having any negative side effects on the environment.

Boric acid is generally known as a desiccant; in other words, it kills by removing the moisture from the body of the target pests, causing severe dehydration which will affect electrolyte metabolism with the potential of metabolic acidosis. In fact, boric acid is a stomach poison normally ingested, along with the fact that it can also enter the blood by inhalation. Boric acid is an acid. Acid will decrease the pH level with the possible side effects of renal, respiratory, and cardiovascular failure. Symptoms and signs of boric acid poisoning are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, headache, dysphagia, cold sweats, dyspnea, muscular debility, scarlatinal eruptions, subnormal temperature, cardiac weakness, cyanosis, coma, collapse, etc.

>snip<

Boric acid contained traces of arsenic, a chemical known to the State of California to cause cancer. U.S. Borax was able to use the EPA de minimus policy, which accepts that zero is not absolute, but very, very small to remove arsenic from its Material Safety Data Sheet. I personally do not see any risk with the trace amount of arsenic at 1 part per million in boric acid and/or borates if used in an appropriate application method. But, not where there will be constant direct contact.

Others in the pesticide manufacturing industry have found that boric acid is an effective and reliable long term pesticide. Consider the fact that the environmentalist groups approved of its use, contrary to their stand on the EPA de minimus policy. When they discovered a possible decrease in sperm count and no development of the egg capsule or ovum plus the stopping of fetal and embryonic development in roaches with the potential to similarly affect other insects, this made it the perfect pesticide, and with the blessings of the environmen- talists.

Those in the fungicide and wood preservative manufacturing industries discovered that boric acid and/or borates are effective and reliable long term fungicides and preservatives. When wood was treated with boric acid and/or borates and then placed in a damp and warm area, the ideal environment for fungus growth you would have no fungus growth. These chemicals also work as a termiticide (prevents and/or kills termites and other wood destroying insects) -- unlike other fungicides and preservatives, which would also break down. Boric acid and/or borates are derived from natural elements, therefore they do not break down readily. When boric acid and/or borates are used as fungicides and preservatives, they serve as a growth regulator rather than a desiccant.

>snip<

I do not wish to see the loss of boric acid and/or borates as we have seen in the past the loss of so many other fine pesticides, due to improper methods of application, which in many cases unnecessarily exposed people to hazardous chemicals. Boric Acid is one of the safest pesticides if used correctly.

THIS IS NOT AN INDICTMENT OF U.S. BORAX for they have always been forthright about providing any new information regarding any of their products.

>snip<

But there is nothing they can do if its recommended use is inconsistent with its own original label when it has been re-labeled by still others.

>snip<

Broadcast application of boric acid (to cover entire areas or surfaces) is not one of U.S. Borax's recommended methods of application on its registered label. Based on U.S. Borax's label, broadcast application would not be the normal occupational exposure and not what I would consider the normal human exposure to boric acid.

Limiting the use (application methods and locations) of pesticides and/or reducing of unnecessary human and/or animal contact with pesticides regardless of their perceived safety is of the utmost importance. Many illnesses may be directly related to a pesticide or chemical but because of its perceived safety could be overlooked.
 

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My textbook says boric acid is primarily a stomach poison with some contact action. A teaspoon is enough to kill your baby. If you put it on your carpet, you could poison your pets. Don't leave it there, vacuum it soon as suggested above. Moth balls are practically worthless unless they are enclosed in an airtight container. They are poisonous to you, so don't put them where you can smell them.

My textbook says an adult human flea can live 2 months without a blood meal during the summer months and a rat flea can live as long as 17 months without a blood meal if environmental conditions are right. Egg laying only occurs after a blood meal. A cat flea is likely to spend its entire adult life on it host. When there is no host available, many pupating fleas become dormant. When a new host appears, they suddenly hatch out.

Gary
 

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Hi Y'all,

Yeahbutt, DIATOMACEOUS EARTH is INERT. It is not a chemical insecticide.
It is the skeletons of tiny, microscopic sea creatures.
It does work as a dessicant, on insects. It gets in the joints of their
exoskeletons and makes breaks & tears in their bodies.

It is so harmless that Folks who keep whole grains, in long-term storage,
use it, by the ounce, stirred into the grain, to keep insects from destroying
the Grain. You simply sift it out before you use the grain.

It can be sprinkled on your carpets and around your baseboards, to control
Fleas, Ants and Roaches.

Diatomaceous Earth along with Vacuuming regularly is a good way to assist in controling fleas.
"Advantage" and "Frontline" on your dogs will complete the control. I don't think you ever totally eliminate fleas, though.

Our Dobermanns are house dogs and we have no fleas. But when we moved
here a year ago they brought them in from outdoors frequently.
Just like flies, around the barn, it is not a one-time thing. It is constant control.
You gotta stay on top of it.
 

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There is a Raid carpet spray. I think the can is purple and you hold it upside down like a carpet cleaner can. Treat the cat and any other fur bearing pets with an appropriate flea solution. Use the Raid and leave the house for a couple of hours. I did 1 treatment and went from 15 flea attacks while crossing the house to 1 flea after 2 or 3 passes.
 
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