Fix a Flat?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Oceanrose, Apr 24, 2006.

  1. Oceanrose

    Oceanrose Driftin' Away

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    Ok guys,

    I have a flat as a pancake tire on my car.

    I went to change it, but I only have half a jack :nono: NO comments on how far I've driven in this car with half a jack. Yes, I should have checked.

    Anyway, I'm hitching a ride to Walmart, but does anyone know, does the Fix a Flat stuff work? It went flat FAST so has to be a nail. YES guys, I am also picking up a jack.. :rolleyes:
     
  2. swamp man

    swamp man Well-Known Member

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    Depending on the situation,it'll work.It's last ditch,though.If its a nail,or something,you can get a plug kit for alot cheaper,it'll do a better job,and you wont have to fill yer tire full of goop.The plugs work great,although,especially on a steel-belted radial,take a little muscle to use.I'd try a plug first.If you want to,PM me,and I'll walk ya' through it,It's easy.
    Nick
     

  3. Linda H

    Linda H Missouri Ozarks

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    The fix a flat works great as long as its a car, and not a truck with a heavy load in it.(It will work fine on an unloaded pickup) A plug will only work if you know how to take the tire off the rim.

    Also be sure to drive rather slowly (45ish & not 70ish) on your way to the tire shop/walmart etc. And the most IMPORTANT ALWAYS tell the guy who's fixing the tire that you used the FIX a Flat. (I always speak to the actual person who's changing the tire because some of those tire places just have kids working). It is very very flamable, and you don't want the repair guy to be standing there with a cigarette hanging out of his mouth when he lets the air out of the tire. I live out in the country and always keep a can or two on hand.

    Good Luck
     
  4. wilderness1989

    wilderness1989 Well-Known Member

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    I put a whole can on a car tire that was still seated on the rim and nothing happened except the can was empty. :cowboy:
     
  5. beorning

    beorning Well-Known Member

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    I've put tons of plugs in tires without taking them off the rim. It is handy to have the rim off the car so that you can find the hole easier. Fix a flat is nasty stuff. Tire techs hate it. I second being sure to tell anyone who is working on the tire that it has been repaired with it. I've also seen it fail pretty miserably when the hole was too big. A plug wouldn't help there either, though.
     
  6. swamp man

    swamp man Well-Known Member

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    I think you have may confused a "patch " and a "plug" .No need to remove the tire for a plug.Pull out the nail or screw with pliers,ream out the hole(cant help but giggle) with the include tool,put in the plug, and get back on the road.The plug will outlast your tires,and you won't catch any kids or old men on fire.
     
  7. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    Professional tire people dislike fix-a-flat, it is common now to use an inside 'boot' patch at the tire shops. Fix-a-flat makes it harder to keep the boot patch adheasived. Tire plugs are lessoning in popularity.
     
  8. swamp man

    swamp man Well-Known Member

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    If ya' cant find the hole,use a squirt if dish soap in some water,spray the offending tire,and look for bubbles-this aint a hard fix...
     
  9. FreightTrain

    FreightTrain Well-Known Member

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    ****A plug will only work if you know how to take the tire off the rim. ****


    NOt true! you dont need to remove the tire from the rim to plug it... and in many cases you can plug the tire on the car without even pulling the wheel off.

    if you buy a plug kit, get the one with "T" handled tools... the screwdriver shaped ones dont offer a good enough grip to push -pull the abrasive shank thru a steel belted tire...

    as for fixaflat... according to the directions, one is supposed to jack the tire up before filling... tires fill better without several tons of car sitting on top of it.
    IF your tire is fully flat, there is a CHANCE that the bead broke and you wont be able to get it seated without the use of a air hose...
     
  10. FreightTrain

    FreightTrain Well-Known Member

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    ahhh , so i see it was already answered by the time i pecked out the message :shrug:
     
  11. Oceanrose

    Oceanrose Driftin' Away

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    ok - I got the car jacked up, but we (as in 3 people) can not get the tire off.

    Do I have to pull the nail regardless of what I use?

    I HATE flat tires :bawling: but at least it happened in the driveway..
     
  12. FreightTrain

    FreightTrain Well-Known Member

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    to plug a tire, yes the nail needs to be removed, then the hole reamed out with the abrasive shank so the plug can bond properly to the rubber....

    if it went flat fast there is a good chance FF wont hold.

    ok , first car needs to be on level ground, set the parking brake hard and chock a wheel... if pulling a front tire chock a rear tire and vice versa.... before you jack up the wheel... take the lug wrench and break each lugnut loose going in a criss cross pattern.. then jack up the tire 2 or three inches off the ground... remove lug nuts and remove tire... carefull not to place any body part under your fender or car.... (in case the jack would slip)

    fix tire or take to a service station...

    after replacing tire, hand tighten the lugnuts w the wrench...
    lower the tire to the ground and fully tighten the lugnuts.... but go slowly and do them in a criss cross pattern.. like how ya draw a star pattern(5 lugs).. or opposite sides (4 lug) go around two or three times tightening them... remove jack n chocks and your done

    NOTE: if your plugging a front tire, either rotate it to the rear or get a new tire... reason is, its dangerous to have a plugged tire on the front of a car because during a steering axle blowout at highway speeds, its tough to maintain control of your car since the rear end (the end with the least resistance) tries to take the lead and throw you into a spin.
     
  13. Gordon-Schumway

    Gordon-Schumway Well-Known Member

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    Here in Virginia on I-81 we have motorist assistance. They fix your tire or put on a spare--or have you towed to wherever you like all for a free will offering. One of the nicest systems in the country. I send them 20 bucks a year because I think it's a great program and makes little old ladies feel secure.
     
  14. Linda H

    Linda H Missouri Ozarks

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    Hmmmm, I didn't hear her mention that she had a compressor at home. The boot patch is a fine fix, but as far as I know she'd still have to reinflate the tire.. Perhaps a kind person like yourself might come along and blow it up for her.
     
  15. blufford

    blufford Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Fix a flat also makes it hard to find the punture after it has sealed it. My tire changer usually scrubs the inside of the tire with soapy water before putting on an inside patch. 20 bucks to patch a tire now (per hole). They won't plug them anymore. I keep fix a flat and a plug kit in the trunk. I guess if your tire had enough wear it might be better to just get a new one. It doesn't seem that long ago when you could get a tire plugged for a couple of dollars.
    Have you ever seen what a briar patch can do to a set of tires?
     
  16. SteveD(TX)

    SteveD(TX) Well-Known Member

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    See my comments on the other thread with the same title by the same person.
     
  17. Dubai Vol

    Dubai Vol Well-Known Member

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    The wheel is corroded to the hub. Take a bit of lumber (or a rubber hammer if you have it) and tap firmly on the back side of the wheel (that's the metal part) as you rotate the tire. persistence and patience pays off here: you do't want to hit it so hard that you bend the wheel, but eventually the impacts will knock the wheel loose.

    I'm assuming yu got all the lug nuts/bolts off. If not, put a length of pipe over the lug wrench as a "cheater bar" to get more leverage.

    You're a lot better off getting the wheel off and taking it to a pro, as some nail holes are not safe to fix with a plug. If you have to buy a new tire, look at tirerack.com. They have good prices, and I've been using them for 25 years, back before there WAS an internet.
     
  18. FreightTrain

    FreightTrain Well-Known Member

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    where on earth are you located that causes your rims to corrode to the hubs? what kind of car?
    ive changed countless tires, and many many sets of both disc and drum brakes, prolly over 50... never heard of a rim corroding to a hub where ya need a mallet or lumber to hammer it off... most rims nowadays are an alloy that corrodes very little if at all, even old fashioned steel rims dont rust them selves to the hubs... heck, even back a few decades when i had cheap corrosion covered "craigers"... i never had a problem.

    now getting steel brake drums off to change or replace the drum brakes is a whole different animal.. they often need to be pounded off.

    as for buying tires online... why? then you need to pay for shipping, then schlep them off to a tire place anyway, then pay top dollar , full price for valve stem,mounting, and balancing... ya dont get discounts for new tires purchased elsewhere.
     
  19. Dubai Vol

    Dubai Vol Well-Known Member

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    Lots of European and Japanese cars use "hubcentric" wheels, whcih fit tightly onto the hub. And when the wheel is aluminum and the hub is steel, you get galvanic corrosion caused by dissimilar metals in contact. Surprised me the first time I saw it on a Toyota back in the early '80s, but I 've seen it several times since.


    You are in for a big surprise. Check it out. LOTS cheaper.
     
  20. FreightTrain

    FreightTrain Well-Known Member

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    WOW! Ok that explains it.. ive never worked on european cars as they are few and far between here.... and all the Jap cars were within a few yrs age.



    i will check it out... thanks!