First pig butchering...alone

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by bbbuddy, Aug 16, 2006.

  1. bbbuddy

    bbbuddy Well-Known Member

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    Well, today was the day to do the dirty deed. We have company coming for the weekend, we bought a feeder pig for a bbq 2 months ago.

    Shot (22) went well, sticking her went well.
    Got a long board and hauled her up onto my tailgate.

    I thought since I didn't have a big barrel I could use the turkey fryer for hot water and pour hot water over towles laid on her....well that didn't work out so well. Took ALOT of hot water, fryer couldn't keep up. Even with a thermometer it was hard to get the right temp.
    After 6! hours of scraping gave up on her feet and snout and got out the blow torch to burn off the rest of the hair. That doesn't work so good either.

    Then I got to butchering.. By that time every fly in the county was waiting to pounce. :grump:

    Well that part went ok, only took me about an hour at the most, including splitting her enough to lay flat for the bbq.

    Much water to clean her up, and now she rests inside a cooler under bags of ice. I am inside drinking a BIG glass of wine....
    I won't do another until I get a big barrel ready and a system for dunking to scrape. The scraping is easy when the water is just right and all, but h*ll when not.

    maddy
     
  2. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    How will you be cooking her up? Well, at least now you know what won't work. There's alot of stuff where I found out the hard way how not to do it. Enjoy your pig roast!

    Heather
     

  3. bbbuddy

    bbbuddy Well-Known Member

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    Ah, we're doing the "3 guys from miami" type roast!
    Looks so easy and mmm good!
     
  4. cowgirlone

    cowgirlone Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like you are doing great! The hardest part is over, the cooking will be easy.
    Take pictures for us if you can! :)
     
  5. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    Too bad you had a rough go of it, but you made it through it. Enjoy the pork, and next time it'll go a lot better.
     
  6. susieM

    susieM Well-Known Member

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    Over here, there's a sort of powder that you can sprinle on the skin, and then the water doesn't need to be so hot. It seems like it's a kind of waxy stuff, and the hairs stick together, and scape off easily.

    If anyone wants me to send them some, just ask.
     
  7. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

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    i think Pigs is about the only thing i have NOT butcherd at home, well that and and a cow, but a cow would be just like a really large goat or something which i have done plenty of lol,

    sounds like you did a better job than i would have done as i wouldnt have known about the scaping and all that, would probably have just tried to skin the pig and cut it up from there,
     
  8. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    If it were not for a spit/barbecue, you would have been right no track. Skinning it is easier.

    But if you like "pretty" hams, then you gotta scrape.
     
  9. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

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    the thing is my family does not eat alot of pork, we just never have, my grandpa and i both get gout though if we eat too much, we like it well enough it just doesnt like us lol.
     
  10. bricned

    bricned Well-Known Member

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    I have found that when it is hot and the fly is bad it is much faster and easier
    to just go ahead and skin the hog.
     
  11. Oxankle

    Oxankle Well-Known Member

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    I know of no butcher now who will scrape a hog--they all skin. I hate skinned hams!!!!

    Anyway, bbbuddy, some time ago someone posted a link to a video of a hog-butchering in E. Europe. Killed the hog, piled straw over it and burned it, rolled it about and repeated, then scraped. The blowtorch was probably not that bad an idea had you known how to do it.

    I have the same plan here as you: A big steel barrel on a slant, a hoist and a door or a sheet of plywood on sawhorses so that I can SCRAPE a hog. A front end loader on a tractor would be SO handy.

    The old folks always dropped the hog in head first, pulled it out and reversed, then laid it out on the scraping board. If any part did not scrape easily it got more hot water poured on, and they were not too careful about exact temperatures, apparently considering "too cold" much worse than "too hot".
    Ox
     
  12. BellsBunnies

    BellsBunnies Well-Known Member

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    We always throw some old burlap sacks over the hog before we scald it and the hair comes right off with the sack.
     
  13. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    The slaughterhouse that we use still scrapes the hogs. They actually charge an extra $20 if someone wants it skinned.
     
  14. cowgirlone

    cowgirlone Well-Known Member

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    Sometimes we burn the hair off with a blow torch, it takes off a couple of layers of skin too. It's not my favorite way especially if we are going to eat the skin. There are usually a few stubbles left deep in the skin.

    If we are going to cook the hog in the ground, the skin helps hold in the juices.

    When scalding by myself, I use cheese cloth, old cotton tea towels or burlap to cover the pig, then dip and pour the liquid over the hog. Saves my back! :)
     
  15. bbbuddy

    bbbuddy Well-Known Member

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    That's what I did, used an old t shirt of my husbands. But it took way more water than my turkey fryer could keep up with. I had to keep adding water and waiting for it to get hot. ugh. Way too hard.
    When I used the blowtorch, I could see the skin contracting big time before the hairs burned, so I just burned the lower legs and snout.

    Well, the 3 city kids, whose parents thought should not see the pig "before", would not even think about eating the pig after.

    Hah! More for the grownups.

    Boy were those kids spoiled. Mom thinks it's ok for them to believe meat grows in plastic. Glad they are gone.
     
  16. Firefly

    Firefly Well-Known Member

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    Here I was feeling all proud and farmery after killing my first chicken by myself, and then I read this! Just to tackle this alone you are braver than I can imagine, and then to persevere through SEVEN hours of struggling--WOW! :goodjob: :clap: :bow:

    You rock, bbb. I hope you had plenty of leftovers!
     
  17. Firefly

    Firefly Well-Known Member

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    One method I've read about is using a metal 55 gallon drum cut in half lengthwise and setting it over a fire, then dunking hte pig. This would probably be impossible for one person to do. An idea came to me, though; maybe someone can comment on how well it would work. What about hooking up a hose to the drain hole on your water heater? I would drain it the day before to get the gunk out, and then set the temp a little higher than what you need to scrape the hair, depending on the outside temp and how far the water has to travel. It seems like this might work pretty well.