firewood - to cover or not to cover?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by shoofly, Aug 13, 2006.

  1. shoofly

    shoofly Active Member

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    This is our second year using a woodstove as our primary source of heat, and we still haven't completely figured out the best way to store our wood. We have it on our back patio - part of it is protected from the elements by an overhang, but it won't all fit under there. Should we keep a tarp over the rest of the wood? All of the time or just when it rains? Never? What's the best way to take care of our wood till the time comes to use it this winter?

    Thanks for any suggestions/tips!!!
     
  2. Country Lady

    Country Lady Well-Known Member Supporter

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    For lack of a better way to store ours, we have it stored on pallets, away from the house, and sheets of old tin weighted down on top for protection.
     

  3. FarmboyBill

    FarmboyBill Well-Known Member Supporter

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    And id never go another year without one while I burnt wood. I dont know where u live, but here, its possible with my 12 X 16 shed to keep wood outside while burning wood inside of it and replacing the inside wood with the outside wood. Once thourly dry, what rain or snow it gets on the outside, once its dried off, wont hurt anything as it will dry off also HERE in Okla. I kept wood on my porch once also, and to the extent that it didnt do it any good, I wouldnt advise it
     
  4. woodsmokeinherhair

    woodsmokeinherhair it's bout quality of life

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    I have either pallets or metal pipes under my stored wood (to keep the bugs and dirt out) and then I cover mine. I also keep it at least 3 feet away from the foundation of my house so that the bugs don't decide to invade me! So my wood gets good ventilation. Wet wood will burn, as long as there are still coals in the stove, but first it has to dry out, and you might get cold waiting for that to happen! lol.

    Woodsmokeinherhair!(been there! done that! and now covers her wood)

    PS: I have also found out that placing wood directly on the ground WILL greatly improve the quality of that ground if you want to put a garden there next year. I guess it draws worms and other good bugs that work through the soil ;).
     
  5. Westwood

    Westwood Well-Known Member

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    Orgininal question? Cover it up! ----, started to make a point, but surely someone else will.
     
  6. DW

    DW plains of Colorado Supporter

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    Too dry in Colorado to bother. We've never covered ours in 26 years but it is very dry here. If it's wet where you live, I'd keep at least part of it covered.
     
  7. shoofly

    shoofly Active Member

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    Thanks so much! This is really helpful.

    For those of you who cover your wood - do you leave it covered all the time, or do you take the cover off for a while if it looks like there is going to be a dry spell?
     
  8. SouthWesteader

    SouthWesteader Gardener

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    Cover it. I didn't do that last year, and I really regreted it. Damp wood is terrible to try to ignite, and causes other prolems, too.
     
  9. woodsmokeinherhair

    woodsmokeinherhair it's bout quality of life

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    us too ..... but and however, sometimes ..... the wind does carry off the tarp, lol .....

    Woodsmokeinherhair!
     
  10. Jillis

    Jillis Well-Known Member

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    It needs to be covered if you live in Northern VT. Last year we had a lot of "thaws" and freezes and a lot of our wood got so iced up we had to break it off the pile with a mallet and then thaw it out before burning. Terrible.

    Covering it with a tarp that was some air holes in it to allow moisture to escape will help your wood to season faster, too.
     
  11. Dee

    Dee Well-Known Member

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    A couple of years ago, friends were getting rid of a few panels of privacy fencing (it is about 4 inch slats with gothic tops, 8 ft each) I put the panels up (8x16)then covered it with metal roofing panels. The fence panels allow air circulation without allowing it to get wet. The wood is then stacked on pallets with a tarp covering the front. Instant wood shed.

    Then we move it to the covered front porch. We put a tarp over that too because the wind sometimes blows snow and rain onto it.
     
  12. Rockin'B

    Rockin'B Well-Known Member

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    We rick it and cover the top with 30 lb roofing felt. It's stiff and heavy enough to resist blowing off when the occasional pice of wood is put on top to keep it there.

    Far better than tarps. The sun warms it up in the summer when we are making wood and it settles nicely. No need for a tie down system.