firewood stacking.

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Arlod2, Oct 21, 2006.

  1. Arlod2

    Arlod2 Well-Known Member

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    Do you have to have those fancy looking rack things. or can I just stack the wood right on the ground?? or can I use some boards to lift them off and them stack?? husband's having kittens over this. sigh
     
  2. suitcase_sally

    suitcase_sally Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You COULD stack it on the ground, but I wouldn't. Bugs and dirt will rot it. We just stack it on old pallets. We have some stacked on concrete. If you live in a very cold area the wood will freeze to the dirt if on the ground.
     

  3. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    we always stack our firewood off of the ground. If you don't do this, soil will cling to the bottom logs and you'll track that soil into the house. In our neck of the woods, the bottom logs will also freeze to the ground and there is no way a person can pry them off the ground. The bottom logs also tend to rot faster.

    We stack our firewood on used wooden pallets that we get for free. We stack the firewood three pieces wide (~5 to 6 feet), about five feet high, and as long as we want. we cover the firewood with a "firewood tarp." The tarp is weighted down by attaching a piece of firewood to each gromment hole. We start a firewood stack by stacking the wood against three T-posts.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Old pallet racking from a warehouse is the best thing I have every seen for firewood storage. These racks can be cut to reduce the height and to recycle parts into more storage. If thought through, the racks can be cut to accept corrugate roofing thus providing some shelter from rain/snow. You cannot overload the rack as they were designed to carry weight. The racks also permit cycling the wood through in a first in first out method thus using the oldest cut and hopefully driest wood first.
     
  5. mrglock27

    mrglock27 Well-Known Member

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    I use t-posts at the ends too. I stack the wood on old 2 by 4's and pallets.
     
  6. Ole Man Legrand

    Ole Man Legrand Well-Known Member

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    Wood stacked on the ground will wick moisture out of the ground. Definitely stack off the ground and in a shed if avaible. Jay
     
  7. BearCreekFarm

    BearCreekFarm Well-Known Member

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    DH built an open-sided, roofed wood shed at our old farm. The "floor" was gravel. It was in a low, muddy spot so he built it up several inches- this kept the wood dry and kept it from freezing to the ground.
     
  8. Arlod2

    Arlod2 Well-Known Member

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    That's what I thought. We live in the mountains in Wv and it does get pretty cold here. I've got a about 3 pickup truck loads stacked on our back porch under cover. and wanted to get four more before the price goes up. right now it's $50. seasoned delivered in a 8 foot F150 full bed. rounded up. dang cheaper than natural gas here. which we got quated $350. plus a month. as we've not been customers for more a year before we can get a payment schedule. I'll get some palates later today from the newspaper company. they just give them away.



    TY Arlod2
     
  9. Shepherd

    Shepherd Well-Known Member

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    We use pallets for the bottom and T-posts and pallets for 'sides' to keep the wood in place & from collapsing. Our wood pile is down by the metal pole barn, quite aways from the house so we can keep carpenter ants and potential termites away from the house. We have a small black metal rack up by the house which will hold about a two day supply. I'd rather have the wood closer to the house, to tell you the truth.
     
  10. fantasymaker

    fantasymaker Well-Known Member

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    WOW Im inpressed at how far ahead you guys are! Ive never had so much firewood cut that I worried about it rotting
    If ya dont wanna buy racks just cross stack the ends that also will promote drying if ya do the whole stack like that. LOL Dont let the guy ya buy from do that and call it a cord though ! It takes a lot more space and looks like a lot more wood!
     
  11. sancraft

    sancraft Well-Known Member

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    Ours is stacked on pallets between 2 trees in front of the house. We bring a night's supply inside at dusk and put 3-4 big logs just outside the door to add at night for longer burning. I have a Longwood box stove and it really eats the wood, but it's all I have right now. I hope to get a really good stove when we build the house.
     
  12. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    We use old pallets as a base and stack our wood in an open, two-sided, log shed. The shed is 20' x 32'. We just finished it today, and are in the process of moving 3 or 4 cords of wood from the side of the old shed into the new covered shed.

    We skidded the shed roof from the neighbors 3/4 mile down the road. They gave it to us; they were going to burn it down. We got all the logs from them too. It was their garage.

    [​IMG]
    That's our son in the picture, visiting with wife and our newest grand daughter, 10 weeks, from Manila. Wow was he good to have around. And btw, he has the prettiest, cutest, best, baby you have ever seen, smart too.

    btw, To skid this roof, we had to load the pickup with wood -- full -- use 4w-low, and low gear, and push with the tractor -- then it skidded fine down the gravel road.

    Keep your wood dry what ever you do.

    Enjoy,

    Alex
     
  13. Arlod2

    Arlod2 Well-Known Member

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    Wished we could do that. but we live in the middle of town and they frown on that. sigh....


    we've got an old metal shed full of crap from the old owners. but husband and I both agree. any wood in there would be on the ground thru the floor and half way skidded into the neighbors below us by the time we're down. LOL
     
  14. Country Doc

    Country Doc Well-Known Member

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    Really nice job Alex.
     
  15. harrisjnet

    harrisjnet Okie with Attitude

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    We used to drive tee posts into the ground, a couple on each end close enough together that your wood rests against both. We threw a piece of old tin down to keep the wood off the ground and threw a tarp over the top. The used tin had nail holes and allowed drainage. Now I don't have a wood burner, only future plans for one.
     
  16. NJ Rich

    NJ Rich NJ Rich

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    My wood is stacked on cement blocks. I use 1 inch water pipe driven into the ground at the ends to support the wood pile. I put a tarp on top to keep rain and snow off the wood. To keep firewood from rotting it must be stored dry. Air circulation is the key to having good firewood.
     
  17. Westwood

    Westwood Well-Known Member

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    T posts on both ends with a wire between to hold them together against the push. Simple and quick.
     
  18. PineRidge

    PineRidge Well-Known Member

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    We stack ours up between the row of pine trees. Generally we use either scrap lumber or junk wood like poplar as the first row. We only have two "sections" covered right now, I need to buy more tarps. We have about 20 pine trees in a row, and my goal next year is to have them all filled up.

    I did buy a little round wood rack at Lowe's to sit on the porch (about $20). It keeps the wood neater since it's right at the front door. It's also a good walk when your carrying the wood from the pile, so it helps to keep some close by.

    I really like the t post idea. So simple it makes me wonder why I never thought of it.
     
  19. PlowGirl

    PlowGirl Well-Known Member

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    I stack my firewood on 2x4's between 2 tposts. The length of the pile just depends on the length of the 2x's I have some 14' stacks. I also stack cut wood between two trees, but also on 2x's to keep the wood off the ground. Tarps and bungee cords complete the process.
     
  20. Rockin'B

    Rockin'B Well-Known Member

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    We cover our wood with 30lb roofing felt. An occasional pice of wood on top holds it in place and it doesn't blow around. It really works well.