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Can anyone please tell me what a cord of firewood measures once it's split and stacked? This is our first year heating with wood and we paid to have a cord delivered but it doesn't seem like we got even close to a cord. :help::help:
 

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keep it simple and honest
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A full cord is 4' X 4' X 8'. However, perhaps you bought a face cord which is about 1/3 that amount...a face cord here goes for about $60 and a full cord anywhere from $150 to $180.
 

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Happy Scrounger
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we recently fell into the trap of buying unseen. The guy said "cord and a half, delivered." okay....we bought. He arrived with a trailer of wood loosely thrown in. trailer was 4x4x10. When stacked, it's BARELY a cord. We've emailed him a gentle sort of "hello. Once stacked that was less than a full cord...and nowhere near a cord and a half. Can we talk about this?"

we'll see what happens.

anyway. a Cord is measured stacked...4'high x 4' deep x 8' long. Face cord is what's on "one face"...4' high x 8' long x 16" deep (or one stick's length)
 

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4 foot by 8 foot by 4 foot

usualy a pile 4feet high 8 feet long an 4 feet deep

i have heard a level pick up bed is a cord , but that is when the standard pick up bed was 8 foot now most ar 6 foot or 6 foot 6 inches what we used to call a short bed

the old pick up bed was 8 long 6 wide and 2 high
 

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4 foot by 8 foot by 4 foot

usualy a pile 4feet high 8 feet long an 4 feet deep

i have heard a level pick up bed is a cord , but that is when the standard pick up bed was 8 foot now most ar 6 foot or 6 foot 6 inches what we used to call a short bed

the old pick up bed was 8 long 6 wide and 2 high
You can't fit a full cord in even an 8 foot pickup bed. Per your numbers 8*6*2=96 cubic feet, not counting for the wheel wells. A full cord (4*4*8) is 128 cubic feet.

The best way to buy wood is to see it stacked at the seller's place, or pay for him to stack it up for you when he delivers it, then pay after you are satsfied. Shorting people on firewood is extremely common, unfortunately.
 

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Master Of My Domain
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3/4 of a cord is usually a heaping truck load. level with the bed, i would guesstimate it is 1/2 a cord.

people that rip off folks on firewood this way really tick me off.
 

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a rick is half a cord 2x4x8'
a cord is 2 ricks
4x4x8'
around here a rick will cost you $40 and a cord $80 delivered and stacked
30/60 you pick up
thats for Oak, hedge, ash
mixed wood will be a little less

These measurements are for tightly stacked wood .
the rip off artists air stack leaving large gaps which shorts the customer by 1/4 in many cases
 

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In Arkansas a "rick" is 4' by 8' by ??? It's the best thing I know of to steal money. Most people accept 3 "ricks" to a cord... but some will cut the wood at a foot (4 "rick" to a cord) very seldom is it 2 "rick" to a cord.

What's funny is when I and sell a cord nobody wants to buy (even though it's prefectly defined as 4' by 4' by 8' or 128 Cubic Feet). I sell 2 rick to the cord.

Pat
 

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All of the regional customs just adds to the confusion. Around here in Michigan people refer to a "cord" but they really mean a face cord which is usually 18" which makes it 1/3 of a full cord but it can vary. Have also heard the term rick used to refer to a face cord though not as often. Right now going prices around here are $50-60 a face cord.
 

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All of the regional customs just adds to the confusion. Around here in Michigan people refer to a "cord" but they really mean a face cord which is usually 18" which makes it 1/3 of a full cord but it can vary. Have also heard the term rick used to refer to a face cord though not as often. Right now going prices around here are $50-60 a face cord.
rick maybe a more southern term derived from the Rack it is stacked in, but it does appear in my pocket equivalent guide )copyright 1932
 

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A cord is a totally meaningless measure. Its usually defined at 4X4X8 feet of wood. But never as to how.
For instance if I was to throw that amount of wood loosely into a container that size I Could have about 1600 pounds of oak.
if I stack it I might have 4000 pounds of oak. This or the next is the most standard of the measures.
If I stack it very Tight I might have 4800 pounds of oak
If I stack it loosely it could be 3600 pounds of oak.
If I artfully cross stack it I might get it down to 1200 pounds of oak.
And if Its dry cotten wood I might be able to get it down to 600 pounds.
 

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In years past I cut and sold a lot of firewood. A cord is a stack of wood four feet high, four feet wide and eght feet long. When I was selling wood I always asked if they wanted stove wood or fireplace wood. In my area stove wood is cut 16 inches long, therefore requiring 3 rick to equal a cord. fireplace wood was cut at 24 inches, and took two rick to equal the cord. A face cord is a stack of wood four feet tall, eight feet long and however long the wood is cut, that can be ten inches or ten feet. its still a face cord. A seventy six ford half ton standard pickup can haul a rick, that would be a stack 4x8x sixteen inches long if the bottom of the bed is fairly well neatly stacked and then heaped up above the sides. A level filled full sized pickup bed will hold about 3/4 rick if its just tossed in. The little modern short bed pickups wont hold much more than a half rick without blowing the springs out from under them. This of course is dealing with green hardwoods. its heavy stuff. some of the lighter woods can be stacked carfully and maybe even get as much as 3/4 rick without problems. :)
 

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The best way to buy wood is to see it stacked at the seller's place, or pay for him to stack it up for you when he delivers it, then pay after you are satsfied. Shorting people on firewood is extremely common, unfortunately.
Good advice.

As a side note, "cord" is not a commonly used term around here with firewood. A "rick" is how most firewood is advertised, bought and sold. A rick is 4x2x8.

Clove
 

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A cord is a totally meaningless measure. Its usually defined at 4X4X8 feet of wood. But never as to how.
For instance if I was to throw that amount of wood loosely into a container that size I Could have about 1600 pounds of oak.
if I stack it I might have 4000 pounds of oak. This or the next is the most standard of the measures.
If I stack it very Tight I might have 4800 pounds of oak
If I stack it loosely it could be 3600 pounds of oak.
If I artfully cross stack it I might get it down to 1200 pounds of oak.
And if Its dry cotten wood I might be able to get it down to 600 pounds.
It's absolutely not meaningless. The specific language of the legal definition varies by state but typically it refers to 128 cu ft of split wood, stacked as tightly as possible with pieces parallel. Not just tossed in a bin, not stacked cross wise, etc. Weight does not come in to play. Remember weight of wood varies with moisture content, so as a cord of wood dries out, the weight will become lower, but the heating value goes up as it dries. And of course a cord of oak will weigh more, and have more heating value than a cord of pine. But it's still a cord, even if the weight or heating value varies. The cord is not a perfect measure, but it's the best way we've got and the standard in most places.

Really though, if you want to know exactly what you're dealing with, you need to look up the laws in your state. I just did a bit of searching and found some documents from various states:

Minnesota - www.state.mn.us/mn/externalDocs/Commerce/How_to_Buy_Firewood_102902050140_BuyingFirewood.pdf - They actually give cubic feet figures that vary from 100 to 175 depending on how the wood is cut and split

Ohio- Defines a cord as: “Cord.” The amount of wood that is contained in a space of one hundred twenty-eight cubic feet, when the wood is ranked and well stowed. For the purpose of this rule, “ranked and well stowed” shall be construed to mean that pieces of wood are placed in a line or row, with individual pieces touching and parallel to each other, and stacked in a compact manner.

So if you really want to know the laws in your state, or try to get recourse for a short delivery, get in touch with the department of agirculture or weights and measures and find out the exact laws in your state.
 

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I think I sell it the simpless way, we cut it up, haul it out of the woods, pile it, then sell it by the pick up load, you load, you haul, and we have a break for each size truck, and I don't care how hight you stack it on the truck as long as you don't use sideboards.
 

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I think I sell it the simpless way, we cut it up, haul it out of the woods, pile it, then sell it by the pick up load, you load, you haul, and we have a break for each size truck, and I don't care how hight you stack it on the truck as long as you don't use sideboards.
not that i buy fire wood but i would be the charicter who would figure out how to stack it 6 foot tall on the back of a truck start with tight stacking like i woul a free standing pile then tarp and tie down tight then drive slow

my family would tell you that i already drive slow , i drove to town and back 10 miles round trip with an apple on the bumper , when i got back my uncle went right back to eating it , i drove a little extra caustios i had deer stacked like cord wood in the truck and was worried i was going to loose one
 

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Around here it's sold by the rick. Most sellers will try to get 2 1/2 to 3 ricks out of a cord by cutting short.
 

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cfabe,
Ohio's would be my second definition , the most standard .
I'll stand by my statement its a meaningless definition. Even useing Ohios very good definition I bet experianced woodcutters could within the law stack two 1 cord piles with at least a 500 pound difference between them. I will further bet that you wont get a conviction with a 1000 pound variance.

cfabe I think your idea to see the wood BEFORE buying is the smartest thing said on this thread.
 
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