Fireplace Surrounds and Mantels

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by ChickenFryChato, Jan 5, 2007.

  1. ChickenFryChato

    ChickenFryChato Lone Star State of Mind

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    Southeast Texas
    So my family and I moved into our new home on Christmas day. Actually, we began living there Christmas day, and are still in the process of moving in, laying floors, decorating, etc. One of the things I love the most about our home is our fireplace. This is the first home I've ever lived in where I've had a working one. The smell of the fire, the sound, watching the fire dance, the heat, the glow....ahhhhhhh. Now, the home has the firebox built into the wall (it's a wood burning fireplace might I add just for clarification purposes), with a mantel that was also chosen and installed by our builders. Right now, the fire box is surrounded by sheetrock (typical wall), with the mantel of course above. I built the hearth myself, however I have not begun the tiling process. My question is this....I like our mantel, however I would like it to be more rustic, and look less....store-bought. I was thinking about making one myself, and was curious if any of you have completed such a task. If so, how did you do it and what did you use? As far as the hearth and surround goes, I'm planning on using some ceramic tile I have left over from my last house, and tiling it all. I may opt for using some flagstone or something else though, although price is certainly a consideration. I have plenty of tile, and it's free, so you can't beat that. What do you all have for your hearth and surround? Stone (dare I ask if it is real or faux), tile, etc?
     
  2. cc-rider

    cc-rider Baroness of TisaWee Farm Supporter

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    I built a corner fireplace a few years ago. The facade around the firebox was storebought "tennessee stacking stone" (I believe). It was the most expensive part, but well worth it. I think about $5 sq foot. I incorporated some rocks from my grandfather's farm (where I grew up), too.

    The hearth is raised, built out of 2x, and then covered with barn siding (again from grandpa's old barn that had fallen down since his death 28 years ago). The top board, however, is a solid piece of wood that is about 16" wide, and stained/weathered to match the sides. The mantle is a wide piece of wood from the barn. A beam, I think. The firebox has a deflector hood so that I don't worry about the mantle getting too hot.
     

  3. ChickenFryChato

    ChickenFryChato Lone Star State of Mind

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    Are you worried about the hearth catching on fire due to it being made of wood? Seems like it wouldn't take but a spark to light that sucker up. Just curious because I've never heard of the the surface of a hearth being made out of anything other than stone or tile (or some other form of material that won't catch on fire).
    It sounds like a pretty fireplace and surround though. I'm curious about how you did the mantel. I'd love to have one made of old barn wood, but I'm not too sure how I would mount it.
     
  4. rwinsouthla

    rwinsouthla Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Southeast Texas? Got any pine trees on your property? Why not sacrifice one for the mantel? I had an old pine that fell at my camp about 7 years ago. I left it for about 4 months before I decided to cut it up. Luckily I started at the top and burned alot of it. Then when I got to the trunk, I thought man that would make some good floors. So I checked and it would have taken about 10 more to make the floors. I then asked another man at a mill and he said he would cut it for me. I had it split long ways. I made two mantels about 8 feet long and about 14" wide. One became the camp mantel, the other went to a buddy's house. The other half was benches on the front porch. Just a thought. Probably would work with some oaks too.