Finally some school security!

Discussion in 'Countryside Families' started by phantompark, Nov 17, 2006.

  1. phantompark

    phantompark Well-Known Member

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    Our local school is now locking ALL it's doors from the first bell till dismissal. No one can enter from any other door during those times, even teachers!
    Everyone has to go to one central door, press a buzzer, say who they are and who they are to see. They are monitored by camera also (as all other doors are now)
    Then a receptionists buzzes them in and they go to the office to sign in and get a sticky pass to put on their shirt.
    FINALLY, they are taking the security seriously.
    This is a small elementary with maybe 600 kids k-6. HS is doing the same.

    So is anyone else's school doing this?
    What are your thoughts?
     
  2. GrannyG

    GrannyG Well-Known Member

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    Our school has been locking the front doors which open to the highway, so they have to walk to the back of the school to enter. All teachers' doors are locked, so the kids have to knock to enter and are let into the classroom, the teacher can see out so she knows who is at the door. No one is supposed to enter until they have been to the office but I think your area sounds safer than what we have. It is so important to keep the children safe.
     

  3. Becca65

    Becca65 Well-Known Member

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    The schools my DD's go too are secured, they have people at each door. the front doors are the only ones you can come in.. I took my DD lunch today at the HS and the lady was standing right at the door asking why i was there.. I told her and said can i sit down and wait? she was a little reluctant but said sure.
    she carries around a walkie talkie too, I'm glad they are doing something like that .. at my other DD's school they have people sitting right at the front doors. have to sign in at the office.
    The latchkey that my youngest goes to , they lock the doors, you have to knock and they have to see who you are before they open the door, the lady running it said after the Amish thing they had a meeting and decided it was time to lock the doors.. i'm glad they are taking measures, but then in a way i think about when i went to school it was nothing like it is today and it makes me a little sad to see what it's become.
     
  4. FiddleKat

    FiddleKat Mother,Artist, Author Supporter

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    All of the schools in our area are surrounded by 8 foot fencing and barbed wire! I was a little put off by it at first when we moved here a year ago from the northeast. At first I thought it was to keep the bears out. But now I can understand its for the two legged critters and thankful for it.
    Daughter's school has only the front entrance open and when you come in you have to sign in and take a "badge" and give a pink slip to the teacher of the class your visiting. And then that slip has to be returned back in.
    I think its a good idea, because you just don't know what kind of freaks are around these days.
     
  5. tiogacounty

    tiogacounty Well-Known Member

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    I have spent the last ten years working primarily on school construction projects, including having input into the design and installation of the security measures. I was discussing this very topic with our superintendent the other day. Although things like magnetic release door latches and intercoms are nice, please realize they are there for your benefit as a parent. They will do little, or nothing, to stop anybody that really wants to do harm, and in some cases they provide a nice warm fuzzy feeling, "an illusion of security", that actually detracts from the real security issues at hand. I'll give you an example. A local district was on lockdown for a day, when a parent alerted the school that she believed that her child was heading to the school, with a buddy and guns, to shoot the place up. After this incident there was a review involving senior level state police experts, who reviewed every building prinicipal's actions. On principal directed hundreds of children to stay in the cafeteria. This room featured twenty foot high glass walls overlooking the woods. No better place than a heavily wooded area to hide a sniper that could kill a few dozen kids before they got to the exit? Not that a school principal should be thinking like a sniper, it's simply out of his range of experience and education. But it clearly points out the illusion of security. This principal though his school was relatively safe, based on the security hardware and procedures followed, but he was totally wrong. If somebody decides they are going to attack a school, the issue will be, how sucessfully was the person slowed in his initial efforts? and how quickly was he subdued? To think that things like badges and intercoms are security, is to just kid yourself. I'm not trying to be nasty, it's just the cold reality of the situation.
     
  6. Becca65

    Becca65 Well-Known Member

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    Yes i see where your coming from tioga, but it's better then nothing!! before they had NO security.. least they are aware of it and are trying to do something about it.. i'm sure school funds have alot to do with it, you can only so much kinda thing.
     
  7. Beaners

    Beaners Incubator Addict

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    Another factor I would consider in school safety is whether the doors are only locked on the outside vs being locked on both sides. A door locked on both sides is a deathtrap in a fire situation. A door only locked from the outside can still be used to let someone else into the building if they have someone inside to open the doors.

    This was how we avoided getting in trouble in high school if we came in late, there were cameras but no one monitors them the whole time (in the past at least.) If we are having people at every door, how are we paying for that? A lot of schools are operating at or over capacity right now. And they can't afford to hire more teachers, let alone full-time security.

    Safety measures sound good, but in a lot of cases I feel they put children in more danger. As tiogacounty pointed out, some of these practices actually endanger children more. And they may also lull people into a false sense of security that someone could use to their advantage.

    Kayleigh