Fencing

Discussion in 'Goats' started by DayBird, Feb 6, 2005.

goat fencing

  1. 2X4 dog wire or chain link

  2. Field fencing only

  3. Fencing panels only

  4. Standard electric wire

  5. High Tensile

  6. Electric tape

  7. Wooden only

  8. a combination of more than one

  9. other??

Multiple votes are allowed.
Results are only viewable after voting.
  1. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

    Messages:
    2,173
    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2004
    Location:
    Pell City, AL
    What kind of fencing do you use? Why?
     
  2. dosthouhavemilk

    dosthouhavemilk Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,174
    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2004
    Location:
    SE Ohio
    It depends on where they are and which goats it is. lol We have one doe we cannot keep in except wehn she is extremely pregnant with triplets and agrees to stay in to be fed. :rolleyes: :haha: She treats the 52 " cattle panels like a ladder. Climbs straight up, perches and then drops to teh ground.

    We have some woven wirish fencing (supposed to be taut but isn't) and along the inside of that we have cattle panels because they were bending it down. That is our doe pen and that is one of the few places we can put our entire herd and have all of them but Utopia stay in.
    In the wintertime in the barn we use hog panles on the well bahaved does, some boards and in the case of our jumpers we use a cattle panel again.

    I am going to try to train them to electric fence this year and use that along with the woven wire fence in a large fenced in browsing area. They will also be allowed to roam free under my care on occassion.
     

  3. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    9,569
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2003
    Location:
    CHINA
    Field fencing..heavy guage on bottom lighter on top 6ft ht. lucky for us it was here when we bought the place (chinese deer fencing).

    You might get away with a row or two above instead of 2 rows of fencing. Goats can be walked, herded or tied out as well, all with caution.

    Mine would like to be right in my back pocket most of the time :no:
     
  4. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,832
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    Location:
    Washington
    I have 4' woven wire fencing with 2 strips of electric tape, top and bottom, inside of the fence. Without the electric my goats were climbing the fence and getting out. With the electric they don't go near that fence.
     
  5. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,665
    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2004
    I put 'fencing panels only', but probably should have checked the combination one. I use pallets for gates on the doe pen, and the front of their manger is a solid sheet of plywood with keyhole openings. The buck pen is all cattle panels, but the manger has a hog panel upside down so the larger openings are on the bottom, and they eat through those larger openings. I have smallish goats (Kinders) and haven't had any of them get out over the cattle panels. I have had my two doe kids pop out through the hole I made in the cattle panels so they could reach their water bucket outside the pen. The large doeling is too big to do that now, but I still have to keep an eye on her smaller sister. The buck, who is almost nine months old, tried twice to go over the hog panel at his manger, but both times he hung his back ankles up in the top wire (I was afraid he'd broken them the first time he did it, but he was fine), and he's given that up -- for now. Come warmer weather, I'm going to add to the height of the buck manger, so we don't have any more shenanigans there. If I had larger goats, I would add some wire at the top of the cattle panels, as I'm sure they would be able to jump out, if so inclined. But I think it's fine for my Kinders.

    Kathleen
     
  6. Sarah J

    Sarah J Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    639
    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2003
    Location:
    Southeast Iowa
    Field fencing. 47 inch high. They stand on it to reach the branches of the trees surrounding their yard but they haven't tried to jump it or climb it and are quite well contained. I use the same for the sheep pasture and the pasture that I had my calf in (and will put more in later). Seems to be keeping everyone in with no hassles at all.

    But then, there's nothing interesting enough on the other side to grab their attention either...

    -Sarah
     
  7. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

    Messages:
    19,568
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2003
    Field Fencing,with two strands Barbwire over the top.Never had a Goat out.

    big rockpile
     
  8. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,910
    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2003
    Location:
    tn
    woven wire, with electric on top and bottom. they stay in.
     
  9. terrafirmafarm

    terrafirmafarm New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Location:
    Connecticut
    We use 4 strands of 12 gauge high tensile electric for our goats, and it works!! We have Oberhasli, Alpines and Pygmys and it works for them all. Not only does it work great- it is inexpensive and easy to set up. We run the wire at 9 in intervals all the way up. Once they learn electric we only turn it on once every week or so!!
     
  10. ForMyACDs

    ForMyACDs Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    433
    Joined:
    May 12, 2002
    Location:
    SouthWestern Michigan
    We currently have the horse-type field fencing (openings are 2" wide and 4" high) but I HATE the stuff! We got it to help keep neighborhood dogs out, but the stuff is SO stiff that it's nearly impossible to stretch and as a result it sags easily. We will be replacing it with "cattle panels" (the type that are smaller openings at the bottom) once we're done fencing in the unfenced back area (doesn't make sense to rip up fence we already have up when we've got unfenced areas yet to fence). We'll also be adding a strand of hot-wire to the top when done.
     
  11. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,205
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2002
    Location:
    Florida
    Red Brand field fence with small openings on the bottom and larger on top. It is 48 inches high. My goats climb to reach for something - like when I'm coming with the hay- but they do not climb out. My initial idea was to put a hot wire at the top but they don't need it.
     
  12. HilltopDaisy

    HilltopDaisy Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    3,891
    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2003
    Location:
    New York
    Also use Red Brand, Sheep & Goat fence, 4" x 4" openings. I have Nigerian Dwarf goats and a couple sheep. The goats do push against the fence to reach outside, but I keep it mowed along the fence to cut down on the goodies out there. I am installing a solar fence charger for predator control, with one hotwire about 20" high and a second about 36" high, outside the fence.
     
  13. trixiwick

    trixiwick bunny slave

    Messages:
    4,389
    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2004
    Location:
    Southeastern PA
    We use the same 4 X 4" sheep & goat fencing as Hilltop Daisy, plus a few strands of electric tape on the inside. I've found that the wire can get slack in spots and a verrrrry enterprising pymgy goat can push and then wiggle under it (and head straight for the house, naturally). The electric keeps them from even trying. I love my goats very much, but there is a certain satisfaction in seeing someone get "hit" when she touches the electric - YOW! There's a goat who's learned an important lesson!
     
  14. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

    Messages:
    2,173
    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2004
    Location:
    Pell City, AL
    Wow, these results are very educational. Just what I needed.

    Ken marked other. Ken, what do you use? I'm very curious.
     
  15. Shazza

    Shazza Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,538
    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2004
    Location:
    Victoria Australia
    :) We use Ringlock all over our farm...4" by 4" squares, as well as...one strand of electric wire for the cows half way up, one strand of electric for does and kids at the top, and one strand top and bottom for the buck yard and the pig paddocks. Works wonderfully....once the kids realize that it's not nice to get zapped. :)

    Shazz
    Rosnasharn Farm
    Australia
     
  16. AnnaS

    AnnaS Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,130
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2003
    Location:
    Verndale MN
    I have 3 foot tall woven wire, a strand of electric and a strand of barbed above that, and another electric about 2 ft off the ground and 4" inside the woven wire.
    I also have one doe who will slide between the top of the woven wire and the barbed wire to get out, and another (her kid!) who will trick the sheep to stand by the fence and use him as a step. The other does vault off the side of the barn and over the fence at the gate. You have to see it to believe it.

    They do this not for the grazing outside, but to jump on my car. :waa:

    Yesterday when I was killing roosters, they all came over to watch- and the visiting buck inspected that top hot wire, then stood up and carefully put his hooves on it, shorting it out and getting a better view at the same time.

    I want 5 foot cattle panels!
     
  17. Stacy Adams

    Stacy Adams Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    222
    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2003
    I use a combination of cattle panels and electric tape.. I love the tape!! it's easy to put up, move around and after being zapped a few times, they all respect it so I don't alway's need it plugged in, heck I can't remember the last time I even had it turned on.. now the LGD will go over it, under it and through it - doesn't faze him a bit, but he does know where the boundaries are and usually stays within it unless the feels compelled to chase something off the property.. ;)