Fencing Questions...need help!

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by cchapman84, Jul 4, 2006.

  1. cchapman84

    cchapman84 Well-Known Member

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    Hi All,

    Just went to Home Depot yesterday and bought twelve gothic-style fence panels (similar to the stockade, but with a little fancier top). So, now it's on to fence posts. I was thinking we could get those things you pound into the ground and put your fence posts on top of. We've got really rocky soil here and the thought of digging out 13 holes to set regular cedar fence posts is really terrifying to me (when digging out small holes for my squash a couple years ago we ran into over 15 rocks about 6"-12" in diameter in only 6 holes about 1' deep each!) But, now my dad is saying he doesn't think they'd be sturdy enough. I'm not even sure what the things are called :shrug: , so I'm not sure about calling up my local hardware store to ask questions, since they'll probably think I'm an idiot (especially being a woman -- not so friendly toward the "fairer sex" unless you really seem to know what you're talking about :flame: ). My other thought was digging in the corner posts (the fence is going to be kind of Z shaped, but with 90 degree angles) and then using the other type for the posts in between. I think that would add enough stability, it's not like we get a lot of high wind out here, and the longest stretch would only need three in-between posts.

    What are everyone's thoughts? And does anyone know what those things are called? The main reason for not digging out that much is that we're planning on putting in a retaining wall next year and want to relocated the fence to the top of it. We just need a fence this year so that I can get my dog here (he's living at the in-laws house right now, and not very happy about it). Any help would be really, truly appreciated! Thanks!

    Cameron in VT
     
  2. MarleneS

    MarleneS Well-Known Member

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    T-Post? I think that's what those metal fence post with the the triangle metal thing at the bottom are called. You drive them in with a fence post setter -- metal pipe large enought to go over post with a set of handles on side to lift and drop the tool. I put some of those in our garden and now I wish to move them it's taking a chain and jack to get them out. I don't think I even had them in the ground above the metal thing on the bottom :(

    Don't take me too seriously, might not know what I'm talking about either, after all I'm just another girl.

    Hugs
    marlene
     

  3. cchapman84

    cchapman84 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Marlene. I'm going to have my mother-in-law call around for me today, she knows everyone in town (I've only lived here a couple years), so she'll probably have a lot better luck. Everyone knows they can't pull one over on her, and even if she doesn't know what something is called, they know she knows what she's talking about (I love going to the auto parts store with her, we get the best service in town). Thanks again!
     
  4. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ..............You probably need to findout what the pro's use to dig a properly 'sized' hole . Then , layout the holes with the proper distance betwixt each hole and mark with a can of that bright orange paint . You , have to be very accurate when digging holes for fence panels for obvious reasons . Now , it's time to hire a Pro to come in and dig your properly laidout holes . Give the cement several days to cure before erecting your panels . fordy... :)
     
  5. The Paw

    The Paw Well-Known Member

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    You might be talking about Super Spikes.... They are about 3 ft long and you bolt a 4x4 into a bracket on the top end?

    If that is what you mean, they are fine for a residential type fence. They would not be good for anything holding livestock, as they would wobble a bit if you lean on them. They would be really handy for pulling out if you do relocate the fence.

    One possible problem is that if you hit a big rock where you want to drive a spike, you might still have to dig it out. When building a fence from scratch, you can move the spike 6 inches either way and lengthen/shorten the rails. If you use panels, the spike has to go in the right spot.
     
  6. cchapman84

    cchapman84 Well-Known Member

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    I think Super Spikes are exactly what I was thinking. When we put in the retaining wall next year, we're planning on putting all the posts in with concrete, but the exact layout of the fence may change slightly, and I don't want to have to dig up concrete from this year (not just the wasted material, but the wasted labor too!) I'm going to have to call around now and see if anyone nearby carries them. Thanks!
     
  7. poorboy

    poorboy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You might want to check in to radio or electric pet fence, especialy as your going to be building retaining wall later, dog would have to wear collar but boundary wire only has to be minumaly buried. Have a happy fourth..:-}
     
  8. Qwispea

    Qwispea Well-Known Member

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    Super Spikes won't work for the fence you've described (As your description said its similar to "stockade"" ..and stockade" fence is 'solid' ..as opposed to picket).. The problem is the wind ..as even relatively minor wind will put too great a force unto the fence.

    You'll need to use 4x4 treated posts ..with at least 1/4 of the post into the ground. If you fence is 6' high ..you'll need 8' posts buried 2' deep. No need to cement if you plan on taking them out within a year ..they'll hold just fine for that length of time. But if you plan on keeping them in longer than that ..I'd use cement. A bag of quickrete per post should be sufficient.
     
  9. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    I don't think anything short of digging a hole like Quispea explained will work.
     
  10. Farmer Willy

    Farmer Willy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If it's temporary fence nail some "feet" to the panels and set them in position. Imagine an arrangement like:
    |
    ___|__

    Use a couple of pegs on the "feet" to keep in pinned to the ground, maybe a brace every so often to make it more stable. It won't damage the panels for reuse, won't require any holes to be dug, does require you to mow around the "feet" for the summer though. You sometimes see the same setup around some construction sites.