Fencing in property

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by CountryMamaof5, Sep 3, 2006.

  1. CountryMamaof5

    CountryMamaof5 Well-Known Member

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    I have 3 acres in a nice rectangular shape. My spouse and I have discussed fencing in our property. It will help keep our animals in and keep other animals out. I know it will still allow some animals but overall discourage them. (such as the neighbors chow/lab)

    We have thought about first doing the perimeter including a gate for the driveway and over time we will section off areas for animal rotations.

    What fencing would be a good idea for the perimeter? I noticed at TSC they have this wolven wire (4x4 spacing) which states for cows. Its 4 foot tall and 330 feet long. Its 220 dollars. It appears to be the cheapest way to fence in our property with wire fencing. Would it work? I know we need TPosts about every 8 feet.

    Would you fence in the perimeter first or sections first? At this time we only have ducks, chickens and pigs but we will be getting a calf in the spring. The land around us is for sale and we definately want to get a fence up before there is neighbors to contend with. I would hate to try and put up a fence and have to argue with someone over it. If we do it now then we are fine. The man who owns the land wouldn't care if we put a fence up. He might enjoy a fence up because then maybe less people would be hesistant about moving next to us.

    Suggestions as to fencing? Also does TSC ever have sales on their fencing?
     
  2. Hammer4

    Hammer4 Well-Known Member

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    If you want to keep dogs etc out, woven wire fencing is a good choice. It's a bit more expensive then high tensile fencing, but to keep dogs out using high tensile it must be electrified and close spaced wires. Woven wire fencing is a pain in the behind to keep looking nice as running a trimmer along it is difficult and uses huge amounts of trimming string.

    I would start with the perimeter wire, then subdivide as needed. The little step in posts with the pig tail on top from Gallagher are real nice to use for temporary fencing, I love them.
     

  3. anniew

    anniew keep it simple and honest Supporter

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    duplicate post.
     
  4. anniew

    anniew keep it simple and honest Supporter

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    I use 2 X 4 welded wire to keep deer out, but it also keeps out the neighbor's dog, although he is not very aggressive. It also keep in my four kinds of poultry except those that fly, and little babes.
    My dogs which are always on a leash, know that the fence is there, but will put their feet up on it if something should approach from the other side or if a rabbit runs out of my land and through the fence.
    You'd probably need something stronger for cows, but it might work in concert with a single electric strand.
    Ann
     
  5. bill not in oh

    bill not in oh Well-Known Member

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    5-6 strand electric around the perimeter will keep dogs out if the fence is built correctly. It will be infinitely easier to maintain, and cost about half of what woven field fence will cost to put up. Woven wire will have little value as predator control with fox, raccoon, bear, cougar, oppossum or any of probably five or six more species that might live where you are. And forget deer... they've been known to clear 8' fencing (I'd like to see that!)

    Electric fence is also fairly easy and fast to put up or take down if you want to move it. You can also make it "species specific" for different paddocks using 6 strands of alternating hot/ground wires for goats or two low hot wires for pigs. I'm not a horse person, but I've been told you can hold a horse with a single strand of tape?

    Nothing says you have to use any single type of fencing, either. You may want something more attractive / decorative in the front of your property that would enhance the "curb appeal" and use the more utilitarian fencing in your liivestock areas.

    4' 2X4 welded wire is my choice for poultry, but it is harder to maintain and keep tight. You can count on replacing it every 5-7 years depending on your local conditions. And if you're going to hatch eggs, it won't hold those little chicks/ducklings/goslings/keets.

    I do use woven wire field fence - for tomato cages...

    I've never seen fencing on sale at TSC or anywhere else. You can, however occasionally pick some up at farm auctions for a little less than new retail.
     
  6. WAB

    WAB Well-Known Member

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    My advice is to build your fence strong from the start and it will save you a lot of heart ache in the future.

    This is the way I built my fence.

    I used 39in "page wire"

    http://www.mytscstore.com/detail.asp?pcID=8&paID=1043&sonID=352&productID=15514

    I used railroad crossties for the corner posts and for the gate posts.With steel "t" posts for the rest of the fence.

    I also put 2 runs of barbed wire around the top and 2 runs of electric fence around the bottom on the inside of the fence, including the gate.

    This fence will work with anything from pigs to horses.
     
  7. whiterock

    whiterock Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Three rules for fencing are : horse high, bull strong, and hog tight.
    Use the woven wire around the perimeter, with a strand of barbed wire along the ground and two or three strands along the top. With insulators on the top strand it can be electrified as needed to keep horses or such from riding it down.

    The cross fencing can be whatever works for what you have and once the posts are in you can go from 5 strands of barbed wire to horse fencing just by taking down one and adding the other.

    BTW, I have seen coyotes running wide open and duck under a tight woven wire fence. Like a ghost, never slowed down.
    Ed
     
  8. swamp man

    swamp man Well-Known Member

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    I like woven wire.It's durable,relatively easy to work with,and I like the way it looks.You can always run barbed wire or a hot wire on top to make it a little more critter proof.The above poster is correct that a low fence won't keep deer out,though.My property runs alond a 6' coyote fence with hotwires on top and bottom,and I've seen deer hop it plenty of times.They make it look easy.
    Welded wire isn't as expensive,but it's tougher to work with,and without building lots of terminals,can be nearly useless in rolling/hilly terrain.
    Whatever you decide on,it's a real good idea to build terminals that elephants could dance on.There's lotsa' ways to do this,but I use 4x4s and 2x4s built into a"h"pattern,and criss crossed with tension wire.I pack the posts holes with gravel,as opposed to concrete,so that when I need to replace a post,I can use a high lift to jack the post out of the hole,replace it,and re-pack it.Works great,and holds strong.
    Your situation may differ from mine,but I'd run the perimeter first,and section off later.If you go this route,though,you may want to at least plan out the sections and their future locations before building the perimeter,because when you DO section off,you will need a strong terminal at every point where a section dividing fenceline intersects with your perimeter fence.I hope that makes sense.
    As far as trimming along a fenceline,I'd leave the string trimmer in the barn,and just spray the fenceline with glyphosate,a shot of 2-4,D,and any surfactant(dish soap works fine as a surfactant)periodically.
    When you go get that t-stake driver,bont forget the Ben Gay and a six pack,"cuz yer gonna' need it.
    Good luck.
     
  9. CountryMamaof5

    CountryMamaof5 Well-Known Member

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    Is wolven wire and welded the same? I dont believe so but I wanted to be sure.

    I do have uneven terrain so I definately need something that can move with the land. I have 2x4 welded wire that I made my chicken coop with and that type of fencing would not work well as a perimeter fence.

    WAB that is the fencing I had in mind for my perimeter. I could definately do a line of electric wire around as I plan on asking my father in law for his charger today at the family picnic. They had cows but will not be having anymore so here is this really nice charger that needs a home. So I could run both.

    One question though. If I run a bit of electricity, Do I need signs that warn people? I dont have close neighbors but I would hate for the first person to be someone sue happy and they get mad or something because they got zapped for touching MY fence.

    ANd what do you do in circumstances where trees are in the way? Like lets say a tree is 75% on my property and the top is entirely on mine. Do I have to cut the tree down? or which side of the tree can I go?
     
  10. CountryMamaof5

    CountryMamaof5 Well-Known Member

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    Hmm I must have remembered the goat fencing price because that site shows it to be 220 but the cattle fence shows to be 158 for the 48 inch stuff.. 138 for the 42 inch stuff. Far more affordable than I was thinking. (70 bucks a roll)

    I really am enjoying all the ideas put forth here in making this fence nice and secure.. Keep them coming!

    I already have my yard staked out with 6 foot steel T posts as part of the survey done. I would add a few more for strength but the railroad ties on corners would definately be a good idea for the more solid strength. I like it
     
  11. swamp man

    swamp man Well-Known Member

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    Nope,they are different.The woven wire has"give",so that it can handle the uneven terrain.
     
  12. swamp man

    swamp man Well-Known Member

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    6 ft is plenty close for the t stakes,but terminals are3 absolutely necessary.Without them,you will only waste time and money.There are various schools of thought on this,but I put terminals at all corners,anywhere a section of fence runs out and a new one begins,and on either side of gates.Basically,anywhere the fence needs to be cut for installation.If your terrain has sudden changes in geography,you'll need a terminal anywhere that the fence hits a point that it must flex vertically.This can make for alot of terminal field lines,but it's necessary for a tight job,and I doubt if anyone ever complained that they built the fence too strong.
    The railroad ties or other terminals are more than a good idea-they are absolutely necessary.You need something very solid to stretch against,and the t posts wont do it.The fence "hangs"on the t posts,keeping it from sagging,but other than that,they have little to do with the structural integrity.You need those terminals.
     
  13. CountryMamaof5

    CountryMamaof5 Well-Known Member

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    I told my husband about this thread and he shook his head yes in agreeance to all and you could see the lightbulb go off when he learned something new. He definately agreed on the railroad posts at corners but i was wondering if We should use more in between or if the corners will be enough?

    Our dimensions are 230 wide by 400 deep. So okay we have maybe 2 1/4 acres. I believe these dimensions do not include right of ways or anything. But I was thinking of coming up the driveway a bit with any extras .

    So basically we are looking at.. well .800 plus 460 is 1260 feet of fencing. Divided by 330 is basically 3.8 rolls. It would leave about 75 feet of fencing which we could come back up the driveway about 35 feet and then put a gate. That way I will have to areas already with three sides to make part of the job done for future sectioning off.

    Would I divide 1260 by 8 to figure out the amount of T Posts? It says 157 and that sure seems like a lot of t posts. That would be nearly 500 just in t posts though I already have maybe 20 on my property (currently about 20 feet apart so I would need more t posts for sure)
     
  14. whiterock

    whiterock Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The number of cross ties will vary with the lay of the land and the soil type. You could put t posts on 10' spacings and be okay depending on various things, such as the length of the t posts , soil type, and such. In the west they space them up to 20 or 30 feet, but that is in range country and the stocking rate is lower. If you choose to go a wider spacing, between t posts, you can always put in more later, just requires one person to hold the wire "away" while driving a new post. Common where we replace rotten wooden posts with new T posts when repairing fence.
    Ed
     
  15. treefrog

    treefrog Well-Known Member

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    good strong corner posts are important. i like the idea posted about railroad ties, but i think i have a better way. i also have a welder. i use tee posts.

    at a corner, i put an eight footer at the corner (they come in any length, the longer ones are pricey) and a six foot six inch post four feet down each line. weld a post across the top of each side of the resulting triangle, and a diagonal from the bottom of the corner to the top of the first line post four feet from it. where there isn't a corner, i put a diagonal going both ways.

    welded steel is very strong.

    pax
    t.f.
     
  16. WAB

    WAB Well-Known Member

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    The butt of the tree is what counts. Make sure your fence is completely on your property or you may be made to move it. I used the 8X12 inch railroad crossties and sank them fairly deep. They dont move, are very strong and last forever.
    We dont use signd here in Sc. If someone touched your fence then they are tresspassing.
    Welded wire wont work for that. Woven wire is the best because it can do a bit of terrain matching without too much trouble.
     
  17. Ole Man Legrand

    Ole Man Legrand Well-Known Member

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    I vote for hi tensile 5 strands with all of it charged with a fence charger. It will keep your dog at home and the neighbors dog out. It is bull strong. You can place the post 30 feet apart.Put springs and rachets in all the strands.Some will say it is a deadly fence but constructed this way we haven,t had any injuries.Tractor supply has every thing you need. Jay
     
  18. neolady

    neolady Well-Known Member

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    I have settled on t-bar posts and page wire (livestock wire). It keeps my mastiffs in and the neighbourhood mutts out - along with any unwanted guests. The deer still jump over it, the coyotes stay out. The last price I paid was $165 for a roll of 4 foot x 360 (or thereabouts) feet. I've tried wooden fencing and the 2-4 welded wire, but this stuff seems to wear better. Page wire for sheep is probably the best bet as the bottom rows are spaced closer together than the top strands.
     
  19. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    i just want to say that anything tight enough to keep a dog out is a pain to keep weed and shrub free without spraying. i guess it depends on the livestock you have. maybe a goat or three would help to keep the fencerow clean.
     
  20. patarini

    patarini Well-Known Member

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    Look at high tensile -- lasts 30plus yrs, will hold anything! Cheaper than the alternatives too. Can be charged or not as you want.