Fencing for woods

Discussion in 'Goats' started by AllWolf, Oct 10, 2006.

  1. AllWolf

    AllWolf We love all our animals

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    What type of fencing do you all use when fencing off in the woods?

    We want some type of fencing that is really good for the back woods with alone keeping out the bad animals so my goats will be safe. Need a fencing that will with stand the tree limbs if break down and fall on it alone with the goats staying in it.

    Forgot to say the land we are wanting to fence off will be just over 1500 feet is what we measured to take the fenced off area back to the barn.

    Thanks for all the help.. It's time for us to start fencing off more land just getting irons in line first before buying.

    Going to go for cattle panels for my bucks and use a different type of panel for my baby goats. :)
     
  2. lgslgs

    lgslgs Well-Known Member

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    We use 7 strand high tensile wire with 3 hot wires. Our land is almost all hilly woods. In the really awkward places where the fence crosses ravines, we fence the bottom of the ravine area with cattle or hog panels and run the wires across above them.

    One nice thing about electric is that you can put fence alarms on it that show a red light if the current is out. That's very nice if you might have a tree down on the fence out of sight. High tensile can also usually handle a tree dropped on it with only the insulator clips popping off. Sure beats rebuilding other types of fence.

    Lynda
     

  3. homebirtha

    homebirtha Well-Known Member

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    We use 6 strands of electric for our woods. We had a tree come down a few weeks ago and it landed on the electric, and on the field fence around the yard. We fixed the electric in about 15 minutes, two of the six strands came apart at a splice. The others just stretched. The field fence was ruined in that spot.
     
  4. AllWolf

    AllWolf We love all our animals

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    I have been doing some reading on fencing on Premier1 supply and seem like they have some really good fencing.

    I have one question how in the heck do you keep the bad animals away from your goats?

    How would you keep like a wolf or another type of animal from going through the Hi-Tensile wire?

    Isn't it easy for them types of dangerous animals to get to your sheep or goats?

    I'm trying to fingure out how that would keep your livestock safe because to me using just that type of fencing would not keep them type of animals out. If it does tell me how and also tell me how it keeps the goats in?

    Why ask this many questions is because I want to keep my goats safe and plus want to be able to keep them in. Do all research and everything before going to buy for land.. That is best I think. :)
     
  5. homebirtha

    homebirtha Well-Known Member

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    Well, we don't have wolves here, so I can't answer that part. But we have dogs that guard the farm, so I think that helps to keep some predators away. Also, the electric is a pretty good deterent to most predators. IT HURTS! A LOT! lol. I'm sure if something were going at it at top speed, like a dog or coyote, it would go right through. But if they're sniffing around, stalking, and get a zap on the nose or head, they look for somewhere else to get dinner.

    Once the goats hit the fence once or twice, they don't go near it again. The key is to make it hot enough that the zap is memorable.

    We don't have sheep, but I understand that electric doesn't work so well on sheep. So I would probably use a field fence for them.

    Oh, one note on Premier, they do seem to have nice stuff, but I found them to be much much more expensive then the local stores. You might want to check your feed store, co-op, Tractor Supply, etc., and see if you can find the same stuff for cheaper.
     
  6. Wingdo

    Wingdo Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Unless I'm sorely mistaken, and I hope I am, I believe wolves are being re-introduced in Maryland too. They already have been in KY, as its the states way of declaring war on the deer populations... they tried coyotes, but the results were not working out as quickly as they'd hoped.

    I personally believe a good dog is worth it's weight in gold with the coyote, but it will require a little more than one good dog for some of the wolf packs (like they have out west). Folks call one dog on a chain, Rover on a rope (or a wolf snack), however, if this dog is loose and has a running mate, it changes the game for everything involved! Even the wolves are more cautious about where, and what, they will mess with when there's multiple scents of dog around.

    Best of luck to you,
    Wing