Fencing for pasture

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Fhhunt, May 15, 2018.

  1. Fhhunt

    Fhhunt Active Member

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    Ok guys. I have a tread about clearing over grown woods and pasture. I'm getting close to having it ready for fencing.
    I'm debating on either woven wire with a couple strands of electric on it or high tensile wire with electric on every other wire.
    I'm going to have sheep in this area with two lgd dogs. The total area is about 5 acres.
    Putting post in isn't going to be a problem cause I'm going to be buying a post hole digger for my new tractor I got.

    So which kinda fence would you all put up. Also money is a concern also.
     
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  2. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    You can use all electric as the cheapest option.

    "Hi-Tensile" is not the same thing as a plain "electric fence".
    True "Hi-Tensile" is an actual physical barrier that can also be electrified.
    It requires very strong corners and braces and usually 250 lbs of tension on each wire.

    A normal electric fence can be done with just enough tension to keep the wires from sagging between line posts.

    Field fencing will be a little more secure, but will be more expensive than electric.

    I do all my pastures with 12.5 Ga Aluminum wire and have the line posts 50 feet apart.

    I used 8 foot telephone poles for the corners with no bracing (4 feet deep in sandy ground) and 2-3" treated wood line posts.
     
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  3. M5farm

    M5farm Well-Known Member

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    Ht wire is my vote. Simple install and very economical. Good corners are a must.
     
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  4. Fhhunt

    Fhhunt Active Member

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    Yeah I understand the difference in high tensile and just plain electric. I had thought about just plain electric fence but wasn't sure about using that.

    I've been reading on it and know I'll have to build good corners for the fence and don't mind putting the time in to do it right the first time. Between the tractor and my skid loader I have equipment to handle it.

    Just stuck on which to do.
    The property lines are all grown up like 45 yrs worth of trees and stuff. I'm keeping the new fence about 8 ft off the line so I can drive around the fence also. The old field fence is still there but in horrible shape
     
  5. Fhhunt

    Fhhunt Active Member

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    Also the ground is pretty flat no big hills or valleys to fence.
     
  6. Hiro

    Hiro Well-Known Member

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    High tensile electric is the best choice for sheep, imho. I would not do alternating hot/ground wires for a 5 acre pasture. That is more applicable to cattle and in more arid areas than KY and A LOT larger acreage than 5. Alternating hot/ground wires will not deter predators at all unless they are so closely spaced they are likely to short each other out too easily.

    I know "the book" on HT electric fence is to tension them to a high degree, I have found they work much better tensioned just past what it takes to keep them from sagging. Usually around 190-200 lbs. You want them to flex some so that a predator can't just leap through the strands without a shock. If they flex, the odds of something getting through without a shock are reduced. The other mistake is placing line posts too closely spaced. Don't put anymore line posts in than are required to keep it a consistent height above grade. If they do flex, it will reduce repairs from tree falls and deer impacts.
     
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  7. Jlynnp

    Jlynnp Well-Known Member

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    We have sheep and personally I would not trust anything other than a woven field wire fence. One of our neighbors has the hi-tensile and it is not uncommon to find his sheep out and in the road. We have woven wire with a strand barbed wire at the top and 3 strands of electric fence on the lower part of the fence. So far no escapes and we are more than happy with it.
     
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  8. secuono

    secuono Well-Known Member

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    You couldn't pay me to keep any of my animals behind just hot wire, high tensile and/or barbwire.
     
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  9. GTX63

    GTX63 Well-Known Member

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    Just watched a guys pigs wrestling and wallowing in the mud. One pig inadvertently pushed another pig right passed the wire and outside the fence. Not a large confinement these porkers are in but just saying, with just the hot wire it does happen.
     
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  10. M5farm

    M5farm Well-Known Member

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    if its built right (HT) it is the best fence out there. I do not worry when my cows are in the fields that i have HT wire. Ive never had one even try to get out , I have had a cow in the past that would go thru 6 strand of barb wire like a roach
     
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  11. TripleD

    TripleD Well-Known Member

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    Rent an auger for your skid steer . A friend of mine did 28 post holes for me. From unloading to drilling and loading back up was 42 minutes . He didn't have a stiff neck from looking over his shoulder...
     
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  12. Hiro

    Hiro Well-Known Member

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    If their sheep are getting out of an HT electric fence then, they either designed it badly, built it badly, aren't maintaining it or most likely have undersized their fence charger.
     
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  13. dyrne

    dyrne Well-Known Member

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    I have no experience with high tensile. It might be awesome but around here you don't see anything but woven wire. With LGDs as well... even with woven wire you probably will want a couple strands of electric as in most cases they will try to make a habit of expanding their range.
     
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  14. Grey Mare

    Grey Mare Well-Known Member

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    High tinsel can be deadly to animals who may get wrapped up in it or stuck. Will slice right through tendon, muscle and bone. We have board fence, hot wire, and each post is in concrete, also had it put up a few inches higher to accommodate our draft horses height. Be really careful when considering it and weight all your options.
     
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  15. M5farm

    M5farm Well-Known Member

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    That applies to all wire. Nothing is without risk. . I have web , barb and HT . The HT is superior but I run a box that insures animals respect it.
     
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  16. Fhhunt

    Fhhunt Active Member

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    Ok can you all tell me the difference between the redbrand field fence and the bekaert high tensile field fence?
    Tsc prices are 159 for redbrand and 109 for the bekaert.

    Does the high tensile field fence go up the same as regular field fence?
     
  17. tiffanysgallery

    tiffanysgallery Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Rule of thumb.. the larger the diameter of wire the easier electricity will flow over and through.

    Sheep (long hair animals) require intense shocks, like those delivered by low impedance energizer, so to truly fear the fence.

    Weeds that touch the wire (electric fence) reduce the amount of current.
     
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  18. AmericanStand

    AmericanStand Well-Known Member

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    Truth is your sheep probably don’t need a fence.
    Don’t even think in terms of fencing sheep in.
    Think about what you need to fence out.
    What’s it take to keep your local dogs and coyotes OUT ?
    Think along the lines of six or eight feet of woven sheep and goat fence. Cap it with smooth electric wire and on a separate charger a wire set out six inches and six inches above ground.
    That’s a good start but you may need a couple of feet of woven wire ground apron.

    Yeah I know it sounds like Fort Knox but most predators find sheep irresistible and delicious!
     
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  19. Designlover

    Designlover Member

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    Hey,

    I would suggest using wire fencing with a couple strands of electric. It's not very expensive and is great at keeping your animals safe. However, I would be careful and weigh all my options before installing it because wire can easily cause harm to animals.
     
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  20. hiddensprings

    hiddensprings Well-Known Member

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    We had a variety of fencing on our farm. We used the red brand woven wire for our goats, although they would stay behind the high tensel electric. The horses had an electric tape fencing, and the cattle hard either high tensil electric or barbed wire. The tape was great for the horses but nothing else. The woven wire is a pain in the tushy to put up, terrible to have to repair if a tree branch falls on it, I’d not use it again. The high tensil was super easy to install, the animals respected it, and I could fix it myself if I needed too.
     
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