Fencing for goats

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Kittikity, Dec 18, 2005.

  1. Kittikity

    Kittikity Small scale homesteader

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    I think my husband might get me a goat for xmas because he's been asking what a goat needs.. We were discussing fencing and we figured some of the metal poles with some welded wire fence might be good? We've got almost two acres but it's not fenced in so we would need to fence in an area just for the goat.. How big should that be?

    I don't know what breed it might be but I'm not too picky right now.. I'd really like to get a nigerian dwarf because they're so cute and I like their compact size.. But if he gets the goat for me, he doesn't know anything really about goats so I doubt I'll get a nigerian.. = )

    I myself have been doing a lot of reading and have been a member of this site for about a year now.. So I'm pretty clear on what all a goat needs.. I just wasn't too clear on the fencing issue..

    Thanks much..

    Jacquie
     
  2. T Lynn

    T Lynn Well-Known Member

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    We used field fencing for most of ours. Although part of it has cattle panels and I like them better. The reason is the goats will stand and push the fence and field fencing gives. The cattle panels do not move. I think next year we are going to run a hot wire around the inside of the fence to keep them off of it.

    Also, you need some sort of shelter. We have 3 sided shelters that are maybe 4 feet tall. And hint for 2 goats because they are herd animals and need company.
     

  3. travis91

    travis91 Formerly 4animals.

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    A goat you need at least 2
     
  4. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Woven wire with a strand of electric running around the inside about a foot off the ground. The electric is to keep them from standing on the woven wire and running it down.
    Cattle panels can also work well, but they are a little more expensive.
    I am having good success with four strands of electric. But the electric must be very hot and have a very good ground. Also you need to teach the goats that its hot before they try to scury under.

    As far as how much space to fence in for a goat. I would fence in as much as possible. Your goat/s will be happier with more space to browse and play in. And please get at least two goats. Goats are very companionship oriented and do *not* do well alone. Good luck!! :rock:
     
  5. Rachel K.

    Rachel K. Well-Known Member

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    I personally like cattle panels. A very strong sturdy fence that won't break down or bend underneath the Goats weight. High enough so that the Goats won't attempt to jump it. The holes along the bottom are small enough that a young kid can't get out, yet they get larger higher up so that the adult Goats don't have a problem with getting their heads stuck. I love this type of fencing. I have it along one side of my Goats pasture. Its the only side that I have never had any 'escapes' from. I also have never had any get stuck in the cattle panels before.

    And yes, I agree. If you are going to be getting a Goat get two. Goats need a Companion and like to be part of a Herd. My two Goats can't be separated at 'all'. They scream and cry for each other.
     
  6. BeaTX

    BeaTX Member

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    My cousin raises goats and when we first started getting goats he told my husband how to make a fence for a goat...
    You build it as high as you can and out of the most solid material you can. Then when you're through you spray it with water...anywhere the water can get out...so can the goat. :nana:

    (we like cattle panels, too)

    Bridgett
     
  7. Sher

    Sher Well-Known Member

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    The best thing I like is 2x4 "no climb" fencing. They can't get a foot hold, so theres no climbing and you can get it like eight foot high if you want to. Our goats just don't even try getting out with it.

    We also have woven wire fencing with a two strands of electric. If the juice goes off..they can still get out. But most of the goats have been jolted pretty good by the wire..and don't like going around it much.

    My first pick is still the "no Climb".
     
  8. TexCountryWoman

    TexCountryWoman Gig'em

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    The folks that posted above all pretty much said the same thing i would say. I would like to reiforce the idea of the three-sided shed. Goats HATE rain and must be protected from the elements. Make sure you have a shelter before you get your goats and you DO need two goats, one will be miserable. In warmer climates what is needed is a good wind-break and a good place to get out of the rain. A tin shed is fine, particularly if it is located under a shade tree so it will stay cool in the summer. Put hay in it for a bed. I use field fencing and cattle panels, wishing I could use all cattle panels as they last a very long time and are very strong. Fence in the biggest area you can afford, you will be glad later. If you can run a pipe for water out there that is great too. Goats love to climb so large rocks and wooden spools make for much fun. Enjoy!...Diane
     
  9. Kittikity

    Kittikity Small scale homesteader

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    I asked hubby the other day what kind of goats he was thinking of and he said the little ones that look like puppies.. So he means the nigerians.. = ) Makes me happy..

    I did know that goats need company.. He also knew that we would need two.. Apparently he was listening the many times I talked about getting goats.. I will try for a buck and a doe.. = )

    I am aware of the need for shelter.. Was thinking of a three sided structure since it gets so hot in Florida here..

    As for the leaning fence issue, would a fence of wood poles and criss-crossed 1X4 with the welded wire as a backing work well?

    Thanks again..

    Jacquie