Fencing Advice

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by bearcat, Dec 20, 2005.

  1. bearcat

    bearcat New Member

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    Our barnyard needs some new fencing. The old one is failing mostly because it's old but the posts are leaning outward quite a bit. In trying to figure out why, I discovered that the previous owner had not sunk the posts deep enough (we need to go about 4 feet up here in Wisconsin). Doing some diging, I discovered why. This part of our land sits on some rock ledge that is about 2-3 feet down. I need a method of setting posts that will keep them stable even in a hole that is not as deep as it should be. Any ideas? Thanks.
     
  2. travlnusa

    travlnusa Well-Known Member

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    The biggest reason for posts to be leaning out is lack of feed.

    Cow is in the pasture, and all the grass has been eaten down to nothing. Cow is still hungry, so she puts her head between the wires and starts to eat what is on the other side. After eating what is within reach, she starts to push to get at the fresh grass.

    I am in WI as well and my posts are only in 2-3 feet. I just make sure there is enough to eat inside the fence.

    With that said, most any cow will poke their head though the wires just for something to do but will not push against the barbs all that much if they can eat inside the fence.

    When the ground is wet this spring, wiggle the t-posts out and move them over a few inches and pound them back in.

    Running a how wire inside the barb will help as well.
     

  3. lapdog59

    lapdog59 Active Member

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    Get a roto hammer and drill a couple holes into the ledge and put a couple anchor bolts into the holes. Use the anchor bolts to hold down the posts.
     
  4. bretthunting

    bretthunting Well-Known Member

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    after reading your post a couple of times,you said "BARNYARD" so assume you are talking about wood rail/plank type fencing. all of my corral fencing is wood rail,built it all myself and set all the wood posts @ 3 feet deep. the key is to do a real good job tamping the dirt around the posts. i have 15 horses in the corrals off and on throughout the day rubbing and scratching on the rails and have not yet had any post leaning and they have been in for 3 years.
     
  5. bearcat

    bearcat New Member

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    Bretthunting, you are correct, it is currently wood rail type fence. For the new fencing, I will either do the same or use an idea I saw recently and use steel gates between the posts. I couldn't afford the most expensive gates but the ones I've seen for a decent price seem pretty strong. We also sometimes have these guys from Kentucky come around with a truckload of gates and sell them for a reasonable price. Either way, I want to make sure that the post stay upright. I agree that part of the cause may be cows reaching through the fence for grass but don't know if I can really stop that unless I take the grass away. They seem to reach through even though they are well fed (grass is always greener on the other side).
     
  6. foxtrapper

    foxtrapper Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Electric. Cows won't reach across an electric fence.
     
  7. Alice In TX/MO

    Alice In TX/MO More dharma, less drama. Supporter

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    ditto on the hot wire inside your new fence.

    another idea is to set a 'deadman' on each post. it's basically a crosspiece set underground.

    here's a really good link to a page all about fencing. if you scroll down about 2/3 of the way, there's a picture and description of a deadman.

    http://pubs.caes.uga.edu/caespubs/pubcd/b1192.htm