fencing across water

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by marvella, Feb 7, 2005.

  1. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    i just got back from paying ($3.17 a piece :eek: :eek: :eek:) for 6 ft. T- posts. i am fencing a total of +/-12 more acres, for goats and horses. in addition to the main field which is fenced with woven wire and electric, i'll have the additional pasture enclosed in 4 strands of electric. in the new part is a small, meandering creek, with high banks on most of both sides. i've fenced over little creeks before and it was the bane of my life. broke my heart more than once. but i have this creek running through the land, and my animals need water, and it's ridiculous to have then fenced away from the water. the only sensible thing to do is try and fence across it. it was also always the weakest place where the goats and dogs got out on a regular basis. hence the broken heart.

    i will listen to any and all ideas.
     
  2. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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  3. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    Around here they put Cable across and Panels where they will swing open to let Brush through.On mine if I thought it was going to rain so much that I would have a problem,I would move my Goats out,check it out make sure everything is ok then move the Goats back in.

    big rockpile
     
  4. chas

    chas Well-Known Member

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    In Pa. they are asking farmers to fence livestock fifty feet from a stream voulantarily!!!! But knowing govt. they are probably going to enforce that policy sooner or later ! :eek:
     
  5. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    Run a wire across the top of the banks. Attach wires every few inches on that wire so they hang down like a curtain. They should end just above the water level. Hook a soda can so it is hanging at the bottom of enough wires to create a barrier. It can be every other wire, or whatever works. The animals will go to investigate, wonder what those cans are and go to sniff them. Zap and they give it a very wide berth.

    Put handles on the ends of the wire that goes across the top so that you can disconnect the flood gap from the rest of the fence. This is because high water can short it out, thus shorting out the whole fence. Disconnect it until the water goes back down. Even though the flood gap is not hot, my cows won't go near it because they learned from nosing the cans.

    If it does wash out...no big deal. Wire and cans are cheap, but I've never had one wash away and my creeks can go up 6 feet above normal level.

    If that doesn't work, I have other ideas, but they are really hard to explain in words.

    The panels on the wires have caused problems for me. They wash out and get buried. Hard to pull the panels up out of the muck to "re-set" the fence.

    Jena
     
  6. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Just be aware, most states & the feds have laws requiring you to fence out livestock from natuaral water. Perhaps some local areas are not enforcing these laws, but the EPA & the greenies are making this a bigger deal every year. Be prepared for it, hate to see you invest too much & find out it all wasted when you have to pull up the fence.

    --->Paul
     
  7. homebody

    homebody Well-Known Member

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    Hey Cyngbaeld, Thanks for the link, will keep for future projects. :D
     
  8. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    i'm a greenie.:) and there are no laws like that here. every farm in the county would have to shut down. i can see it becoming a problem in a place where there are a lot of people.

    now what jena said- i've seen that mentioned on here before, but i'm missing something. how and why are the cans attached to the wires? the whole rig sounds to me like it would be shorted out all the time. if the dangling wires sway in the breeze, or if the dangling cans? touch the water. i'm afraid i just don't get it. at the old place i used to pile up rocks under where the wire crossed the creek, like a little dam, but it got washed away every time it rained.
     
  9. gspig

    gspig Well-Known Member

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    In Ky, your neighbor, if you have over 10 contiguous acres, you must file a water control plan with the FSB (fed. farm services board). Plan includes fencing water ways to keep animals from standing in the water. I do believe that you can fence so that there is a drinking area.
     
  10. Lrose

    Lrose Well-Known Member

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    We have 7 acres fenced with sheep fencing with three strands of barb wire above it. Where the fence crosses the brook and animals could go underneath the fence if they stood in the brook;we simply attached sheep fencing to the bottom of the original fence and let it go down to the bottom of the brook and weighted it with big rocks. the goats can't get through and the fence doesn't interrupt the flow of water in the brook. We also made easily accessible areas to the brook and the goats and horses all go to these areas to drink from the brook rather than climbing down less accessible embankments. This seems to work well and protects the brook enbankments from eroding away.We only had to show the animals the easiest place to drink from the brook a couple of times and they have gone there ever since. We made a gradual sloping runway to the brook with fine gravel and dirt to walk on . We also made a stone wall in the brook against the bank to keep it from eroding and washing into the brook.