Fence posts - 'curing' your own, etc

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by computerchick, Jul 10, 2005.

  1. computerchick

    computerchick Keeper of the Zoo

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    Since we're dropping away from the CCA stuff, and would like to utilize some of the timber that is coming down for pasture - any ideas on fence posts, or resources on how to 'proof' or 'cure' them? I've heard burn/lime/salt as different options.

    I'd be using primarily locust and post oak...I have very rich loamy soil where they are going - with lots of rocks.

    Thanks in advance!

    Andrea
     
  2. ed/IL

    ed/IL Well-Known Member

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  3. Darren

    Darren Still an :censored:

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    The locust should last for forty years without treatment. The oak, if it's large enough may be worth more for railroad ties. Maybe you can sell the oak and buy some hedge posts. Untreated hedge posts will last at least fifty years without treatment. That's how long one test has run without any of the hedge posts showing rot. After fifty years even creosoted posts are showing signs of rot.

    Charring a post does nothing to improve the lifespan. It actually reduces it because the diameter is reduced.
     
  4. computerchick

    computerchick Keeper of the Zoo

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    Thank you! Looks like I may have some options before I worry about treated wood...

    The driven posts that are already out here are locust and I know they are 100 yrs old - can't even get a nail into half of them they are so petrified!

    Thanks again

    Andrea in WV
     
  5. Darren

    Darren Still an :censored:

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    For some reason, I thought you lived in the Midwest. Forget the hedge posts. You don't often see an Osage Orange tree in WV. The locust will serve you well. As for treated, I wouldn't hesitate to use them but I'd try to get them custom treated to marine spec which is 2.5 lb CCA rather than the .4 or .6 that used to be sold.