Fence Post Trees, What Do You Call Them?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by NWSneaky, May 26, 2005.

  1. NWSneaky

    NWSneaky Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    266
    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2005
    Hedge, Osage Orange, Locust??????????????

    TIA.
     
  2. Sparticle

    Sparticle Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,750
    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2004
    Location:
    Missouri
     

  3. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

    Messages:
    19,568
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2003
    We call them Hedge.They last forever ,but if their seasoned you can't put a Nail in them.

    big rockpile
     
  4. MaryNY

    MaryNY Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    915
    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2004
    Location:
    New York
    Around these parts, they're called locust trees. Had a grove of them on a place I used to rent.

    MaryNY
     
  5. Jaclynne

    Jaclynne Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    5,364
    Joined:
    May 14, 2002
    Location:
    N E Texas
    Bois d Arc, osage orange, horse apple - it's all the same tree. I had a big Bois d Arc cut into slabs for a garden bed about 17 years ago. Its still there and no rot at all. Plus, its a pretty yellow wood. Not that it matters for a fence post.
    Locust is a different tree, but good for post also.
     
  6. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

    Messages:
    6,244
    Joined:
    May 11, 2003
    Location:
    Arkansas
    I believe the word Ozark came from Bodark.
     
  7. mamajohnson

    mamajohnson Knitting Rocks! Supporter

    Messages:
    5,783
    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2002
    Location:
    North East Texas
    ROFL! I think I was 30 something years old before I realized a bodark tree was a Bois D Arc tree! LOL!!! I always thought it was spell bodark.
    We dont have those here too much, so we use cedar or sweet gum, but have to keep oil or something on them so they dont rot away too fast.....
     
  8. garrett

    garrett Member

    Messages:
    16
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2005
    Location:
    missouri
    Has anyone here used the locust for fence posts? Does it last very long? I have been cutting the hedge for posts, but never really thought about the locust. Those 4-6 inch thorns would be the worst part of trying to cut them.
     
  9. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,510
    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2004
    We call it hedge.

    Speaking of locusts and their wonderful thorns. Once when I was a kid I was running through the woods in the dark (long story) and I ran headlong into one of these trees. I had no idea a person contained so much blood. Running full speed into a tree is bad enough but I just had to pick a locust. I'm lucky I didn't poke my fool eye out or puncture my jugular. I can still walk down by the creek and pick that tree out. I've also noticed a squirrel can hit one of those trees at a full run and climb it full speed without missing a beat.
     
  10. MaryNY

    MaryNY Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    915
    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2004
    Location:
    New York
    The variety to locust that grows around here doesn't have thorns. It is a tall, skinny tree that doesn't get much bigger around than a fence post might be. The bark is thick and has deep "creases" in it. It is a medium-dark gray color. And it lasts a long time. I have seen it in fences with wire strung between them, but that wood sure looked really old and weathered and had been there a long, long time.

    MaryNY
     
  11. leoaloha

    leoaloha Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    126
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2005
    Location:
    Hawaii
    Locust was the post of choice here on the east coast years back
    last a loooong time
     
  12. BaronsMom

    BaronsMom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,274
    Joined:
    May 22, 2005
  13. MelissaW

    MelissaW Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,030
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2003
    Location:
    NE Ohio
    Locust is what we see here. Garrett, we have some of the originals from the old farm out back, and I'm guessing they are at least 50 years old. They look pretty weaterworn, but they are just as sturdy as ever!
     
  14. ibcnya

    ibcnya Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    437
    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2004
    Location:
    South East Iowa
    Osage or Hedge as we call it 'round here. Farmers and other timber owners sell them here for posts usually late fall and winter at the Saturday barn sale. They bring between 2 to 9 dollars for a 8' line post and 10 to 30 for a corner depending on how straight they are. Hedge was first used as a natural fence just by the nature of it's growth. (crooked and thorny). Used as a post they last longer than a treated post.
     
  15. Nette

    Nette Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,811
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2003
    Location:
    NC
  16. Mandy

    Mandy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    89
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2004
    Cedars here too...or hemlock

    Mandy