Fence charger question

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by Firefly, May 30, 2006.

  1. Firefly

    Firefly Well-Known Member

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    I want to run electric fencing around my 1+ acre property, and I want to have an electric fenced pig enclosure and put some poultry netting around chicken tractors. Can I use one charger for all of this? If so, how do I run multiple connections from those little terminals that have a screw-on wire holder? I am looking at this type of charger, fairly cheap and light duty (not necessarily this brand--which brand do you like?): http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...4252948?_encoding=UTF8&s=hi&v=glance&n=228013
     
  2. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    I strongly suggest that you get a higher end fence charger. A Parmak SE3 is a decent high output charger for the money and has a good warranty and is fuse protected. Kencove is a dealer for this item. You will see that if will weigh more than twiced what you are considering and the output is greater. A charger like this should give years of service other than lightning hitting it. The units are repairable even after the warranty expires. Kencove sells a knife switch disconnect for different pasture to be energized as well as some stainless steel clips that have a pigtail wire so that you can have multiple feeds to different pastures. Study through some of the products while you are at their site to get a better feel for what is available. You could search the net for a possible better price on a Parmak SE3.
     

  3. Siryet

    Siryet In Remembrance

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    I agree "Cheap" is not the way to go with letric fence chargers. I have a pathmark and it is wonderful. I have only replaced one fuse since we got it.
    A friend gave it to me after years of hard work on his place and it is still ticking.
     
  4. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    Check out a Manual Joint Clamp. I think that's what you need. Premier has one. If you have a catalog it's on page 80 in the 2006 annual addition. Otherwise it's product number is 337000. I'm sure you can look it up on their website.
     
  5. Firefly

    Firefly Well-Known Member

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    Thank you gentlemen! Looks like the Pathmark is no more, but the Parmak is actually cheaper than the kind of weak Kube battery charger I already have. It's a plug-in model, and wouldn't you know the house box is 5' from where I'd like to mount it! I would have to put it in the garage and run wire over the ground to the fences. I worry about the chickens pecking at it and people tripping over/stepping on it. How would I solve that problem, and is there a good battery charger?
     
  6. John Schneider

    John Schneider Well-Known Member

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    Firefly, you could always bury the line to get it out of the way. Being cautious, you should mark with a sign the fact that a line is buried. You can purchase heavy duty wire that is buryable or some conduit. Alternatively, you could get some conduit and run the wires through it and then construct a wooden bridge to go over the conduit so nobody trips and it will look neat and tidy.
     
  7. Firefly

    Firefly Well-Known Member

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    Conduit, good idea, thanks John! I could attach it to the side of the house with U brackets, coudln't I? Then most of it would be off the ground. I probably will bury it, but if I don't, the conduit is adequate protection from the chickens?
     
  8. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    The parmak comes with mounting tabs. You can buy at farm stores an insulated galvanized wire to carry the power to the fence . You could place the referenced wire in a conduit if you wanted extra protection. Get the proper clamps to ground the charger to the ground rods. Try to use all galvanized materials. Passing electricy through dissimilar materials creates corrosion!
     
  9. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    Firefly they make insulated wire specifically for this purpose - it is usually used to transfer electric fence from one side of a cattle lane to other when gate is open. You could mount fence charger on garage, then run this wire buried out to fence, then use manual joint clamp at fence to split power source to various lines needed. For a really neat system, put in a Cut-Out switch to each of lines, thus allowing you to maintain charge on all but one you are working on. See page 79 item #333000 Premier cat. This would allow you, for example, to have power on pig fence while you shut off power to poultry netting to move it.
    See page 78 of Premier for visual and explanation of special underground electric fence wire. Unless you plan on digging there, a shallow trench of a feww inches made with a hand shovel should suffice to bury it.
    Should work slick when completed. Heather&Mark
    PS Bury underground wire AND run it thriugh a piece of plastic pipe, conduit, or a chunk of old garden hose. That will protect wire and poultry, as others above suggested!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  10. Firefly

    Firefly Well-Known Member

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    Thanks again all. The "DUH!" partial solution to this is to move the current battery charger to the new pig spot next to the house and pole, and put the new plug-in charger in the chicken coop next to the current pig enclosure. That's only ~15' of ground to cover with no people issues so I can put it in peck-proof conduit and be done with it.

    Before I buy the plug-in, is there a battery charger that is good and will handle a fence that will likely get some brush and grass contact?
     
  11. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Firefly, with the above referenced charger and the size of you acreage you will be very satisfied. If will deliver a good shock with some trash growing on the fence. Once you get accustomed to the plug in charger you will put the battery charger aside to have as a backup.
     
  12. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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  13. Firefly

    Firefly Well-Known Member

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    I got hit with a big pile of unexpected bills, so a new charger is out for now. Could I hook a 2nd line up to my battery charger, Kube with .2 joule output? I could build a 2nd enclosure a few feet from the first one and hook up the line, either directly from the charger or from one enclosure to the other. If this will work electrically speaking, is there any other reason why I should not do it this way? What if the new pigs are on ground previously occupied by the old pigs, is that dangerous?
     
  14. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    As long as old pigs were in good health new pigs should be ok there. I'm not sure on the .2 Joule as I don't know technical electrical terms, perhaps someone else could answer that. For 2 small pen enclosures, as long as no heavy vegetation is shorting out fence, I would think charger should keep them hot. Just no beach balls,LOL. These fencing projects can get spendy. Oh well, 1 day at a time.