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Hi. Long time reader of the message boards here, first time poster. Asked on another site and would appreciate your thoughts as well.

We just bought a few acres and are planning to fence it off. Going to use either 2 5/8" or 2 7/8" pipe for braces. Was planning to dig holes and set in concrete, but I talked to a fence contractor and he said to drive the posts (I have access to a driver).


Would be faster to drive. If I did concrete it would be 3 ft deep, 9 inch wide holes. While it's close to area I'm from and have fenced, the soil is completely different. It's real dark, rich soil, not many rocks. (I'm used to thick clay about 10 inches below the surface).


Would be good condition pipe, no used up oil field rejects. Also it's south Texas so frost heaves for concrete shouldn't be a factor.


And this would be my first fence using steel pipe post braces - only wood posts in my experience so far.


Again, just talking steel pipe posts for the braces. Anyway, do any of you have thoughts on driving vs concrete?
 

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What is the purpose for the fence? I drove T posts, cut notches in them and cut a couple more T posts to length for braces and it has worked very well. Then again, I am fencing in alpacas, not bulldozers. The alpacas will honor most any boundary this side of painting a line on the ground marked "do not cross". I certainly would use something more substantial for hogs!
 

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Concrete is a waste when it comes to setting fence posts.
 

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You want Corners Solid, when I used Wood Corners I always just poured a Bag of Kwikcrete around the post maybe pour a bucket of Water around, 3 Post and a Brace. Did very good. I used Osage Orange.

big rockpile
 

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How long and whats it for...….what type of fencing.

Weather conditions and soil type...….

I would use that to help make a decision.

Look at other fences in area...possibly ask around town...….


Depending on the soil and climate, both wood and metal rot......depending on soil and climate as to which one will last longer......if the top of the metal pipe is open, I have a good idea which one will rot off first.
 

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We drove our fence posts. It faster, and you can hang what ever fence material you want on them as soon as they are driven. We use 6" flat based posts and drove them with a tractor mounted post driver in very very rocky ground. Each one took about 5 min.
 

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Here in AZ I set all my posts in concrete and I only use pipe posts. Wood doesn't last here at all with it being so hot and dry. And the ground is either too rocky or too sandy to think about driving them. 41/2" in the corners to build the deadmen off of, 2-7/8 and 2-3/8 posts and rails or top rail and either 3/8" cable, no climb, panels or chain link. Not sure where you are and i know each region has they're own ways of doing things but maybe this will help you make a decision. The corner posts I dig with a 2' auger 5' deep the rest are 8" or 10" and 3' deep. I have also used a fiberglass or rubberized coating on the bottoms of the posts where they'd be in the concrete but mostly on the dairies where cow poo in mass quantity is invloved. Doing it this way here ensures a fence that will stay put and last a very long time. Hope this helps!
 

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If I did concrete it would be 3 ft deep, 9 inch wide holes
I have found that for corner posts three feet isn't deep enough. I use 2 7/8 in drill pipe, weld together H braces ten feet tall, and set them four feet deep. The pipe will eventually rust, but the termites here eat wood posts for breakfast. So, in thirty or forty years, I will have to replace the corners.
 

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Thinking back to my previous post, I think that fence WOULD keep in bulldozers!
If you are trying to fence in cattle or horses, this is what a normal gate should look like. In the southwest oilfield pipe and sucker rod, is cheap and plentiful. So you see a lot of gates and corals like this. I have been on ranches where the gates and corals, were built like this in the early fifties. They were used to catch and load wild cattle. And they had never needed any repair in all of that time.
 

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If you are trying to fence in cattle or horses, this is what a normal gate should look like. In the southwest oilfield pipe and sucker rod, is cheap and plentiful. So you see a lot of gates and corals like this. I have been on ranches where the gates and corals, were built like this in the early fifties. They were used to catch and load wild cattle. And they had never needed any repair in all of that time.
I know that I tend to go light on my fences but it comes down to a combination of not being certain that the fences are going to be in the same places indefinitely and that the alpacas will honor anything this side of a line painted on the ground marked "do not cross".
 

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I know that I tend to go light on my fences but it comes down to a combination of not being certain that the fences are going to be in the same places indefinitely and that the alpacas will honor anything this side of a line painted on the ground marked "do not cross".
I see your point. But in an area with cactus and heavy thorn brush, cattle develop a different opinion on what they can or can not get through. Many times a five strand barbwire fence is more of a suggestion, than a fence. I have a mule who jumps five strand barbwire fence to go visit the neighbors.
 
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