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I'm curious to know how some of you feed your goats. I've always fed them their grain one at a time while milking and after drying them up I just feed them in a bucket all together. I think I've probably caused some under feeding on some as they have to fight a little bit for the feed or one may eat faster than others.
I've had some condition problems lately and am just rethinking some of what I'm doing with them. Thanks
 

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I feed grain spread out in the plastic hook-over-the-fence type feeders. They are raised to a height that is reachable ONLY if they balance their front feet on a block. This seems to cut down on a lot of pushing and shoving, they soon learn its counter productive. However, I too still have some that are fatter and others skinnier due to genetics and one whose health was compromised as a baby(Ironically, my fattest goat is the daughter of my skinniest). Be sure to check inner eyelids and be diligent with minerals/baking soda. Parasites and deficiencies are usually a bigger factor than competition when it comes to condition. Grain is a small part of the diet, given free-choice quality hay goats should maintain an acceptable weight. If they're not, look into possible causes.
 

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Dairy or meat goats? lactation stage? Age? What is your forage situation - quality of hay/pasture? What body conditions are we talking, here? Depending on the owners, the interpretation of a body condition good/bad is variable. :p
http://www.luresext.edu/goats/research/bcs_factsheet.pdf

Have you done fecals lately to see if there is a parasite problem?

Here, dry does get nothing special (in addition to free choice hay and/or pasture) unless they are in the last 4-6 weeks of pregnancy, and also a small amount of grain when I'm flushing them for kidding. They should be around a 3 on the body condition scale out of 5 for breeding/maintenance. Bucks don't get any grain unless they're not holding condition through rut, which I encounter occasionally when they'd rather spend their day pacing a fencline yelling at the does instead of eating... :p

Lactating animals are fed grain pretty much free choice 2x per day while milked. One doe who peaks at 2gal/day is allowed to continue eating tied at a place in the milkroom as well after she is milked, as she drops a lot of condition and requires extra feed. We generally do that with the higher producers - average producers/FF get enough while being milked, we find - then are put back out promptly after milking. We used to weigh feed but they never ate it all in the time of milking anyways, so found it a waste of time. :p Anywho, our mix is a 16% grain that we mix with alfalfa pellets, BOSS, and shredded beet pulp. 12 parts grain, 6 parts alfalfa pellets, 3 part SBP, 1 part BOSS. We add in the alfalfa pellets because we do not like the alfalfa hay locally, and the shredded beet pulp as a non-rapidly fermented energy source. BOSS is for fat and protein.

The kids are on a lamb grower with a coccidistat (lasacosid) as well as balanced 2:1 calcium: phosphorus. When young we free choice it, but as older kids we do one 'scoop' per day (in addition to free choice hay and/or pasture). We continue them on that until they breed for their first season, then we take them off after they're confirmed bred.

All animals have access to free choice hay (usually a soft grass)/pasture, minerals and baking soda. Here we copper bolus/BoSe 2x per year pre-breeding and pre-kidding.

Sorry I don't have amounts, but I rarely weigh or measure anymore. If they're thin or producing a lot, I feed more. If they are fat, I feed less. Unless they are producing, they should be able to maintain weight on forage (pasture or hay) alone - if not I check fecals for parasites and if that's not the problem (and I can't find any other management reason for their poor condition), I'm like to cull as I don't need livestock that are 'hard keepers'. :)

If you're feeding them all together, you will need multiple 'stations' to feed them at. If the bully goes to a different pan, then the subordinates just run to the pan the bully vacated. I suggest SEVERAL stations, such that 2-3 goats max are at each station.
 
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I'm curious to know how some of you feed your goats. I've always fed them their grain one at a time while milking and after drying them up I just feed them in a bucket all together. I think I've probably caused some under feeding on some as they have to fight a little bit for the feed or one may eat faster than others.
I've had some condition problems lately and am just rethinking some of what I'm doing with them. Thanks
I have stand alone combination hay/grain feeders in each pen, as well as steel pipe grain feeders that hook over the fence for grain. I do not normally feed grain to anything except weaning kids. I allow a minimum of one foot per doe for feeding, and I have been known to run interference for timid does/former bottle babies to make sure they get their fair share come feeding time.
 
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