Feeding Rabbits Naturally

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by MaggieJ, Oct 11, 2007.

  1. illinoisguy

    illinoisguy Well-Known Member

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    Adult rabbit diets....what I have read online is that they need 2-4 oz of pellets per day. Is it acceptable to just give 2 oz but supplement with safe greens such as weeds and mulberry leaves and twigs? It is summer time and I have abundance of greens. I also have an apple tree that produces apples slightly larger than golf balls...I give half to each rabbit each night....is that okay?
     
  2. DandeeRose

    DandeeRose Well-Known Member

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    Ive seen a lot of neat stuff reading through this thread, however,i have not seen many natural recipes for grain.Ive seen that people feed sunflower seed and rolled oats and such, but not how much or what types of grains each person mixes.Ive raised rabbits for five years, and have always given them greens and hays, but would like to also get rid of pellets altogether.[What kind of herbivore needs animal tallow or animal fats??]But I need a few recipes to base off of in order to get started.Any help would be greatly appreciated by me and my American Chinchillas! :)
     

  3. Oregon1986

    Oregon1986 Well-Known Member

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    My bunnies just had kits,should I give them more fresh greens or cut back?
     
  4. Fire-Man

    Fire-Man Well-Known Member Supporter

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    What I do is lay a little fresh greens in the sun for the day---then tear it into pieces and put some in the bed with them when they are about 2 weeks old----just a few little pieces about the size of a quarter. Each day I drop some in and soon as I drop some in I will see them start nibbling on them----the whole time Mom still gets her greens, hay, pellets etc. As soon as the babies start jumping out their bed I some what dry(not completely) all the greens before putting them in. The babies will be nibbling on them with Mom. Over the next couple weeks I will dry them less until I am putting in fresh undried greens. I have never had a baby that got a torn up stomach that I know of and I do collect all the poop on screens just below the cages so I can easily see all the poop.
     
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  5. Oregon1986

    Oregon1986 Well-Known Member

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    Thank you that helps a lot
     
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  6. MaggieJ

    MaggieJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    For quite a few years, I fed my rabbits an alfalfa hay/grass hay mix, small amounts of whole grain (no more than 1/4 cup per rabbit per day) and as many fresh or dried greens as were available. They also had a trace mineral salt block. I never found it necessary to have a grain recipe. They usually got whole wheat, sometimes barley and occasionally oats. All those grains have approximately the same protein content, so I never worried about a recipe. My rabbits did just fine.

    As the kits leave the nest box and begin to sample adult foods including grains, you may want to increase the greens gradually to keep up with demand. However you feed your adults, start the kits off the same way from their first nibble. As their appetites for adult foods increase, they will already have the gut flora to digest them. Fresh greens are no problem for young kits, as long as they have access from the beginning.

    When you think about it, rabbits in the wild have access to fresh greens once they leave the nest. If it harmed them, the species would soon die out.
     
  7. greenTgoats

    greenTgoats Well-Known Member

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    We do 100% greens fed rabbits. If you're giving them plenty of greens then cutting back on pellets would be fine.
     
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  8. jimmy588

    jimmy588 Member

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    What are some drying methods we can use on plant parts to save for winter?
     
  9. Mammie71

    Mammie71 Member

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    I like to gather grasses and weeds and hang in my greenhouse for the rabbits and chickens...also they love pumpkins. These help them stay hydrated between watering (if you don't have heaters) and growing pay grass supplements. I like to feed them sunflower seeds too when it's really cold. Be careful with high sugar content foods like apples. A few times a week is good but every day could be too much.
     
  10. Mammie71

    Mammie71 Member

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    I mean oat grass. Darn spell check
     
  11. jimmy588

    jimmy588 Member

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    Now that it crossed my mind I could use a dehydrator
     
  12. Mammie71

    Mammie71 Member

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    They are nice for your food but for the rabbits you might be better off with an attic, garage, dark dry stairwell. Something like that so you don't have to get finicky with cutting it.
     
  13. MaggieJ

    MaggieJ Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Tall weeds can be bundled, tied and hung to air-dry out of direct sunlight. Good ventilation is important and thin bundles dry better than fat ones. As long as they don't go mouldy, they will be fine. Shorter weeds can be dried on screens or in those large mesh bags that onions or oranges come in. Store in a dry location and when you feed them, remember that dried greens look like very little but pack lots of nutrients.
     
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