Feeding pigs on a budget?

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by awhobert7, Oct 1, 2003.

  1. awhobert7

    awhobert7 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    72
    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2002
    Location:
    east central ky
    find a local vegatable wholesaler/retailer, ask to pick up their scraps. You provide the garbage cans. Try to catch the milkman to get the out of date stuff. There is a small store that he drops old milk and cheese off for me to pick every week. Find a day old bread store, they sell out of date bread cheap for feed. We've been doing these for over five years.
     
  2. slkirky

    slkirky Member

    Messages:
    19
    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2002
    I have two hogs that I am feeding out for the freezer (although I really dread that day as I am kinda, well, pathetically, attatched to them!) Due to my husband being in a serious accident at work and the incompetance of the workers comp insurance company, funds are very, very tight around here.

    For that reason, I am looking for ways to stretch my feed dollars as far as possible, while not doing anything to harm my livestock in any way. We are using a lot of rice and pasta, etc. to stretch our food budget, are there any budget tips you all can offer for feeding the pigs? Currently they get several gallons of goat milk a day, surplus eggs, and hog finisher. They also get any table scraps we have, except pork cuz I dont want them eating relatives :) They get the occasional chicken as well, not always intentionally! Can I boil up rice to give them? I am using that as an additive to the dog food for our 2 dogs, they like it and also I am using some old venison I forgot about. Any tips you all have would be great, I am pretty frustrated here and guess I could just use some encouragement.

    Thanks,
    Stephanie

    PS These are the first pigs I have fed out... got em as 25 lb weaners, they are at least 70 now, 2 months later.
     

  3. Farmall

    Farmall Active Member

    Messages:
    39
    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2003
    My 1939 Morrison book called Feeds and Feeding has nothing on rice for hogs, which means it is not productive. Fnd a feed store that will give a discount on buying ton amounts of feed. My feed store will give what amounts to 1300lbs when you buy a ton, OR if you only want a ton, you only pay fr 1700lbs. This is in bulk, in the back of my pickup. It is shelled corn, which is the cheapest you can feed them. If your not buying your rice in huge amounts you are losing money, and besides that they wont do anything but subsist on it, not gain
     
  4. Farmall

    Farmall Active Member

    Messages:
    39
    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2003
    I said 1300lbs. If you buy a ton at my feed store they will either give you 2300lbs, and you pay by the ton, or iof you want a ton only they will charge you for 1700lbs quoted at the difference between buying by the 100lb and by the ton
     
  5. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    7,154
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    With all the stuff you are already feeding them, I would only feed them some shelled corn.. I wouldn't feed them anything that you could have eaten because corn is cheaper than pasta or rice.. If you live in an area that grows field corn, you should be able to buy it by the sackfull at a feedmill or grain elevater.. It sould cost less than $6.00 per 100 pounds.. The old rule of thumb was a 40 pound pig should be butcher size after eating 10 bushel of corn. (560lb) That was without the goat milk and other scraps your's are getting.. They require salt. Unk
     
    Wanda likes this.
  6. Ed Norman

    Ed Norman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,332
    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2002
    Location:
    Idaho
    After a wind came thru town, I saw an apple tree at an eye doctor's place had dropped all the apples. I called and they said come and get them. We got about 5 bushels. The pigs love them. We pick up piles of barley in the field when the combines overrun the grain cart. In a few weeks, they will start potato harvest, if they get 7 out of 10 potatoes out of the field and into the trucks, they are lucky. And they will give you all you want left in the fields. I bet the pigs will eat them too, although I haven't tried yet.
     
  7. fin29

    fin29 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,622
    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2003
    Location:
    Maine
    Don't know where you're located, but the guys around here buy breads and pastries by the truckload from the bakery thrift store to bait bear. I'm sure that would be fine for pigs, too-well, maybe not the pastries.
     
  8. Sunrise

    Sunrise Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    66
    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2002
    HI


    ,

    They really don't need to have the Hog finisher yet.
    with the goats milk and eggs I would get shelled corn it is alot cheaper than finisher and feed the corn also talk to the produce dept at the grocery store about getting their throwaway produce they will usally save iy for you. Some times if you live in or near a small town the will also give you out dated dairy products. I am taking it that you milk your own goats. Do the drop their grain on the floor while eating that can also be fed. Also any older hay can be fed They don't eat alot of hat but they will eat some. Also there are alot of gardens that are done so any garden produce or plants from the Veg garden also. Might also check with the nearest Pizza place for pizza they might be throwing away.
    Hope some of these Ideas help as there is nothing better than pork that has been raised by yourself and without chemicals

    Joe
     
  9. Tracy in Idaho

    Tracy in Idaho Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    879
    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2002
    Our pigs go to the butcher this week :)

    We raise ours on nothing but goat milk, eggs, whatever scraps we throw them, and rolled grain. Around here, barley/corn is the cheapest and that's what they get.

    If you get a barrel going, put some grain in it, pour milk in and let it sour. The nastier it smells, the better they like it.


    Tracy
     
  10. Oxankle

    Oxankle Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,282
    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2003
    Location:
    Arkansas
    Uncle Will;

    Give us a heads up here.

    After feeding the ten bushels of corn, what should this 40 pound pig weigh at butcher time? What would you expect if the pig was on pasture while being fed the ten bushels of corn?

    What would be the cash input?
    Pigs, $20 each $20.00
    Corn & $6/100 33.60
    Salt 2.00
    wormer?
    other?
     
  11. Matt NY

    Matt NY Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    98
    Joined:
    May 28, 2002
    Location:
    New York
    I wish I had some milk for my pigs. I get bread and cakes free from the local distributor. I feed them that first before I give them their daily load of squash, cukes, tomatoes, etc. Boil the potatoes first if you feed them that, also cut them up as thet can choke on them. I chop a couple corn stalks for them each day, some times they clean up the stalks and all. My pigs prefer their beans cooked too. I won't feed them any store bought feed again.

    YMMV
     
  12. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    7,154
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    The old ten bushel to feed a pig out was for hogs about 220 pounds.. Top price hogs back then weighed under 230.. The hogs they raised were not as long and lean as most of the hogs raised today.. The 260 pound pigs they prefer now would have had too large a percent of fat back then.. Even though every one cooked with lard, they could only use so much.. Another reason to butcher smaller was feed conversion.. The larger a pig gets, the more feed it takes to make a pound of gain.. You can get more gain per bushel on younger hogs.. Leaving pigs run on pasture was common.. Ringing them was an absolute must if you didn't want the pasture turned upside down.. I seen a test where the pigs were feed on different types of pasture with different levels of protein in their grain ration.. The cheapest gain was with pigs on alfalfa pasture and ground corn with a little salt added.. They weren't as even in size when fed that way, but the total average gain cost the least.. Most people put their hogs in smaller lots when they got over about 170, because they thought they were running off too much fat in large fields.. I never seen a test to prove that one way or the other. The main source of boughten protien 60 years ago was "tankage".. This was cooked animals from the rendering plants that went around and picked up your dead animals when you called them.. They would even pay you a small amount for them.. A minimal amount of it was used mostly because it cost money which very few had.. Soybeans weren't raised as a grain crop then.. A few people planted them for a quick hay crop..
    When feeding hogs on a small scale like having a couple to butcher, feeding them anything you can find without laying out much money is fine.. Just don't feed them any meat scraps such as resturant or meat market garbage unless it is well cooked.. It is illegal to sell hogs for slaughter that have been feed raw garbage.. Their meat will be red and the packing houses can tell they had raw meat..
    Unk
     
  13. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    7,154
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    The old ten bushel to feed a pig out was for hogs about 220 pounds.. Top price hogs back then weighed under 230.. The hogs they raised were not as long and lean as most of the hogs raised today.. The 260 pound pigs they prefer now would have had too large a percent of fat back then.. Even though every one cooked with lard, they could only use so much.. Another reason to butcher smaller was feed conversion.. The larger a pig gets, the more feed it takes to make a pound of gain.. You can get more gain per bushel on younger hogs.. Leaving pigs run on pasture was common.. Ringing them was an absolute must if you didn't want the pasture turned upside down.. I seen a test where the pigs were feed on different types of pasture with different levels of protein in their grain ration.. The cheapest gain was with pigs on alfalfa pasture and ground corn with a little salt added.. They weren't as even in size when fed that way, but the total average gain cost the least.. Most people put their hogs in smaller lots when they got over about 170, because they thought they were running off too much fat in large fields.. I never seen a test to prove that one way or the other. The main source of boughten protien 60 years ago was "tankage".. This was cooked animals from the rendering plants that went around and picked up your dead animals when you called them.. They would even pay you a small amount for them.. A minimal amount of it was used mostly because it cost money which very few had.. Soybeans weren't raised as a grain crop then.. A few people planted them for a quick hay crop..
    When feeding hogs on a small scale like having a couple to butcher, feeding them anything you can find without laying out much money is fine.. Just don't feed them any meat scraps such as resturant or meat market garbage unless it is well cooked.. It is illegal to sell hogs for slaughter that have been feed raw garbage.. Their meat will be red and the packing houses can tell they had raw meat..
    Unk
     
  14. slkirky

    slkirky Member

    Messages:
    19
    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2002
    Thank you ALL so much! I am going to substitute cracked corn for the finisher for the time being, that will save me a few bucks right away. Unc, you talked about raw meat turing pigs meat red, will raw chicken do that, or only raw beef? I ask because my pigs do get some raw chicken.

    Thanks again!
    Stephanie
     
  15. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    7,154
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    I don't know if chicken will cause the red meat problem.. As long as it was not a regular part of their diet, I would doubt if it would cause a problem.. Some things have more digestable food value after they are cooked.. Potatoes and dried beans are a couple that comes to mind.. Taking the meat scrapes away about 6 weeks prior to slaughter clears up the carcus.. (I think???} Unk
     
  16. BChipmunk

    BChipmunk New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2003
    Thanks, Uncle Will. Nice to have experience to draw on. I've not messed with a pig in almost 65 years and I want to put a couple on the ground next spring.

    I knew the bit about the tankage--I've gone thru several tankage mills in the course of business. Never did fancy the thought of eating meat from animals fed tankage, but all the producers did it then.

    Just as an aside, when I first moved on this place the "used cow truck" would pick up dead cattle or horses
    free. Now they want $25 to come out for a dead one.
    Ox
     
  17. Judy018

    Judy018 Member

    Messages:
    14
    Joined:
    May 12, 2002
    Do you have any food auction houses in your neck of the woods? We have a Wed night one here, and at the end of the night, all the unsold boxes of produce are chucked out. Our pigs have been getting LOTS of feed from that. Some folks got 41...yes, 41...boxes of romaine lettuce for $1.00 last week! There was at least 40 heads of lettuce in each box. not bad for a dollar....especially a Canadian one! LOL

    Judy
     
  18. slkirky

    slkirky Member

    Messages:
    19
    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2002
    Judy that sounds WONDERFUL! Any ideas on how to go about finding one in my area? I know where the livestock auctions and swaps are, they took me awhile to find, but once you find one the rest are easy :) I would love to be able to buy raw foods like that for my beasties!

    Stephanie
    *Rejoicing because the workmans comp check FINALLY arrived!!!
     
  19. Judy018

    Judy018 Member

    Messages:
    14
    Joined:
    May 12, 2002
    I don't know where your area is, as it doesn't show, but you could just look under Auctions in the yellow pages and call around to see if they have anything like that. This food auction does all kinds of auctions including auto, but Wed is for household and grocery items. Another great source is a resteraunt, if you know the owner or manager. The cooks/staff could put all the food scraps into a bag-lined garbage can and you just collect at the end of each day. If you have lots of pigs, a buffet style place would be another option for leftovers. They're usually pretty good...especially if you would part with a roast or 2 in return after butchering. The worst they could say is no, so it's always worth a try IMHO. Best of luck finding one close to you.

    Judy
     
  20. Idahofarmergal

    Idahofarmergal Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    65
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2003
    Location:
    Idaho
    Other ideas for free pig food:
    Produce stands throw out cases and cases of overripe fruit, and will gladly give it to you.
    Restaurants: If you know the owner or frequent the establishment, you might be able to talk them into filling buckets with table scraps. Maybe promise them a little of the finished product. Restaurants throw out an unbeleivable amount of food every day. I raised the best pork ever when I worked at a restaurant. I brought home 2 to 5 five gallon buckets a day. It had loads of variety and I fed nothing else. Those were some happy pigs.
    Lots of stuff out of the garden that you don't want to eat can be cooked up for pigs. Keep a bucket handy when you are out there and throw in stuff like broccoli, cabbage, & kohlrabi plants after you harvest the good stuff. The pigs like the tough outer leaves and stems just fine if you cook them up. Funky potatoes and carrots, overgrown squash and cucumbers are relished when cooked. I also throw in lots of weeds while weeding, but you have to know your weeds to do this. Clover, lambsquarters, pigweed (amaranth), chickweed, etc. are good and very nutritious. Greens (bitter lettuce, buggy kale, etc.) might be eaten by your pigs without cooking. Mine adore bok choy! Just don't feed anything in the nightshade family (tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) except potatoes. Do not feed potato plants.