feeding baby lamb

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by Redeemed98, Jan 18, 2005.

  1. Redeemed98

    Redeemed98 Well-Known Member

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    We have a 1 week old lamb that we would like to bottle feed some. The lamb is with his mother so I am not sure how much we can feed it. I went to the feed store and all they have is a large tub of powder milk for sheep and goats. Is there anything that we can mix up at home to feed the lamb just like a treat that will be safe for it to drink. Thanks-Greg
     
  2. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    If it is just occasional suppliment, feed it a little whole milk from the store! Add some heavy cream and it wouldn't be very different than what it is getting. At one week it could start eating a creep feed ration though, and that would make a bigger difference. BTW that "big bucket" 5 kg of replacer keeps pretty well. I just bought a 20k (44 pound) bag for my first supplimenting lamb, it won't last long really.
     

  3. mawalla

    mawalla Well-Known Member

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    Greg,
    Why are you wanting to bottle feed this lamb if it is with the ewe?
     
  4. quailkeeper

    quailkeeper Well-Known Member

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    Also, is it a ram or ewe lamb? If it is a ram lamb you don't want to bottle feed it at all!! Unless he is soon to become a whether :rolleyes: In fact, I found out this year you don't even want to touch the ram lambs. Learned the hard way.
     
  5. Redeemed98

    Redeemed98 Well-Known Member

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    I just want to let my daughter bottle feed her just for the heck of it. We have only 3 sheep that we keep in the pasture with our horses, they are more like pets than anything.
    So Ross, you are saying it will be fine to feed the lamb some whole milk? I just don't want to spend the money to buy the supplement, we may only feed her a few times. Thanks.,
     
  6. imabone

    imabone New Member

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    I was just advised by a sheep rancher that bottle feeding a ram lamb is the best way to ensure a gentle ram that is easy to work with. What was your problem with bottle feeding?
     
  7. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

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    imabone, too much handling and petting of a ram lamb creates a ram that has no fear...or respect...of humans when he gets older. Some breeds are worse than others, but they can be very dangerous as they'll come after you and butt you with those nasty, hard heads of theirs! Many a person has ended up battered by a ram who's chosen them as the target.
     
  8. quailkeeper

    quailkeeper Well-Known Member

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    The best way to treat a ram is to totally ignore it. When my ram got about six months old I thought it would be safe to tame him. HAHAHA. He is now only about 10 months old and when he wants petted by golly you better pet him or he'll send you flying. And when you do pet him its never good enough. Boy will I be glad when he's gone.
     
  9. Cat

    Cat Well-Known Member

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    I doubt you'll have much luck getting the lamb to nurse if it gets its fill of milk from Mom. I've tried feeding older starving orphaned lambs that aren't getting any milk at all and they just refuse to drink!! You may be able to but I'd put my money on it not happenin'. I'd start giving grain treats if it were me!!
     
  10. mawalla

    mawalla Well-Known Member

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    GWILD,

    I was just wondering if there might be a problem with the ewe. I've had many bottle lambs that I let run with their mommas but bottle fed because they were from a multiple birth. They would be at the far end of the pasture with the rest of the flock but when they saw me they would come running because they knew they were sure to get a full belly without their big siblings butting them out of the way. Most I started on a bottle by the 2nd day but a couple I started later because as they grew I noticed that they needed supplementing. Currently, 8 adult sheep in my flock were bottle babies that I raised, 7 ewes and a ram.

    BTW, my sheep ALL love a treat of bread and will come running for it. That might be a good way to gentle your whole flock. We get ours from the discount bakery for next to nothing. (My husband calls it "the used bread store")
     
  11. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Hi Greg,

    Would agree with most of what has already been said. If the lamb is getting sufficient from it's dam it's not going to be interested in a bottle anyway. Like Catherine, I've tried rearing older mis-mothered or orphaned lambs and they won't have a bar of it so a lamb that is getting it's quota is a waste of time. Also animals are not play things for your children to muck around with - and I'm sorry if I sound harsh in saying that but lambs do much better on their dams than being interferred with when it isn't necessary. About all you would end up with, assuming it would take a bottle, is a lamb with the scours. If you want your child to learn how to rear and take care of an animal, find an orphan lamb for her.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie