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Discussion Starter #1
I had a 7 1/2 month old buckling die this morning.

He developed diarrhea about 1 week ago, so I was treating him for Cocci.

Did a 5-day treatment of Sulmet, and was providing him daily with electrolytes and some probiotics.

We keep our bucks in a rotating pen, so moved them to new pasture as soon as the 5-day treatment was completed.

Yesterday, he looked like he was in full recovery, but I was continuing the electrolytes.

This morning he was not getting up and his rear was messy again. I could not get him to swallow anything I tried. He was already too weak and died within 20 minutes of me finding him like this.

I noticed after he died, that his testes were shriveled up. I had not noticed anything unusual with them over the last couple days of treating him.

Is it possible to have been something other than Cocci?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, Alice.

I got the idea for Sulmet from Fiasco's website. They also say Albon is their first choice; with Sulmet the second. The Sulmet was available at my farm store, but the Albon was out. With time being critical I went with what was available.

The other question is it typical for a buck's testes to retract upon death? Or could this also be a symptom/indicator of something other than Cocci?
 

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Sulmet is not treatment of choice but it should have helped, as you saw... Of course, that doesn't mean that it was coccidia causing your main problem. Coccidia would not be my first guess in a buckling that is 7.5 months unless really stressed, issues with management (these can be out of your control) or exposed to high levels/no prevention in early life. What was his body condition? Eye membrane color? Coccidia prevention in early life? I have never treated an adult for coccidia in 12 years of raising goats, and if I had to, I'd just put it down because I don't want those poor genetics in my herd. Usually resistance to coccidia takes about 6 months to develop, and after that, should not be a disease of concern in adult, well managed livestock except to control shedding into environments where young stock can become exposed.

High parasite load, bacteria (Salmonella in adults) and changes in diet/exposure to toxic plants are other things to rule out. Temperature, body condition, environment, and having a fecal done would be helpful. :p
 
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