Homesteading Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
209 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My FF Saanen kidded 12 weeks ago and has been feeding a single buckling. I am having a really hard time keeping weight on her and she just keeps getting thinner. I am getting a fecal done this afternoon to see if worms could be contributing to her condition. Her eyelids are not as dark as I would like to see.

We feed a 50/50 mix of alfalfa pellets and whole oats. I have senior equine that I top dress her feed with a few times per week. While I am inclined to believe that worms are the issue, I just wanted to check feed amounts. How much feed would you give a lactating Saanen per day?
 

·
Be powerful. No other option exists.
Joined
·
40,305 Posts
Gradually increase feed. You can't jump it up quickly, or she will get sick.

Did you treat her for worms when she kidded? Worms flourish as the hormones change after kidding.

If she's a big Saanen, she'll need more feed than a regular .... say, Alpine.... doe.

Does she have good quality free choice hay and browse?

My Alpine here gets two pounds of oats/Kent feed per milking, and it could be increased if she'd just EAT IT! She's on the thin side.

I also highly recommend starting her on a peanut butter sandwich protocol. Start with 1/4 sandwich for a few days. Increase gradually. B Vitamins are good, too.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,837 Posts
For our milking does, we let them into the milkroom 2x per day and allow them to eat while in the stand and in the milkroom without running out. Our mix is 12 parts 16% grain mix (soybean dairy pellet, oats, corn, etc), 6 parts alfalfa pellets, 3 parts shredded beet pulp, and 1 part BOSS. My doe that peaks at 2gal/day is let in first and she stays in the whole time, 2x per day. The ff which aren't working as hard are brought in to eat/be milked, then let out again. It is hard to say how much to feed because I never measure anymore. It will depend on size of doe and how much she is lactating, what life stage she's at etc. Quality of the forage is important to. Quality of forage should increase in late pregnancy and through early lactation, but can be only of moderate quality during late lactation/early preg.

That being said, does that are early in lactation WILL loose weight. Metabolically, lactation is the hardest work a body can do. Not that they are STRESSED - that isn't the correct term - but lots of things are going on. :)

Does should receive a dewormer at kidding. That is the only time I deworm 'on schedule'. Your idea of getting a fecal done is a great one. :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Alice In TX/MO

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,352 Posts
Second kudos on the fecal. Brown stomach worms can also cause a decline in BCS and they don't usually cause anemia, so FAMACHA isn't a good indicator with those.
 

·
Unpaid, Volunteer Devil's Advocate
Joined
·
18,366 Posts
A friend did the fecal today. She saw a tapeworm and what she thought were strongyle eggs.
Interesting, tapeworms are often missed on a fecal. That
"she thought she saw" points out another shortcoming of doing a fecal.
You can as easily miss seeing eggs as you can see something and misidentify it. I do not know how bad the parasite load would have to be to change eye lid color. I favor regular wormings with a scientifically proven product. Fecal is good when the doe is actually passing eggs and enough samples are taken.
Milk is a wonderful food, full of vitamins and minerals. As such, your doe needs her vitamins and minerals replenished, for the milk and to maintain her own health. A supply of minerals should be readily available and/or added to her feed. I prefer a mix that also contains selenium.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
954 Posts
We also use Kent feed, 18% milking goat cut w/ 50% oats by weight comes to about 14% protein, and alfalfa pellets on the stand. What she needs depends on what she produces, which can be hard to determine if she isn't being milked at least once a day. I would start small and add until you like what you see or challenge feed her if you are milking her. Add a little every few days until her milk totals don't increase. We do this every now and then for all our girls, so there feed is adjusted some according to what they need during their lactation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
209 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Interesting, tapeworms are often missed on a fecal. That
"she thought she saw" points out another shortcoming of doing a fecal.
You can as easily miss seeing eggs as you can see something and misidentify it. I do not know how bad the parasite load would have to be to change eye lid color. I favor regular wormings with a scientifically proven product. Fecal is good when the doe is actually passing eggs and enough samples are taken.
Milk is a wonderful food, full of vitamins and minerals. As such, your doe needs her vitamins and minerals replenished, for the milk and to maintain her own health. A supply of minerals should be readily available and/or added to her feed. I prefer a mix that also contains selenium.
She just emailed me back and said she looked at the pictures she took from the slides and the goat came back clean...no tapeworm, eggs, or anything. I am going to call the vet tomorrow and arrange to have a fecal done there to double check.

I failed to mention that she has access to loose Manna Pro Minerals all the time.
 

·
Unpaid, Volunteer Devil's Advocate
Joined
·
18,366 Posts
If you take a quality complete feed and add an equal amount of grain, are you reducing the amount of balanced minerals a tiny bit? I believe the grain will have vitamins and minerals, but not sure there would be enough minerals.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top