Fast growing evergreens?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Jotun, Dec 28, 2005.

  1. Jotun

    Jotun Well-Known Member

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    I am interested in any sugestions anyone would have on what species of evergreen would be most economical and grow fastest. I live in Virginia. Any ideas would be appreciated. (we want to use them as a road screen)
    THANKS
     
  2. mountainman_bc

    mountainman_bc Well-Known Member

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    For conifer evergreen- eastern cedar. Western red cedar grows a bit faster but it becomes a HUGE chore to keep to size, and it grows huge if you don't trim it.
    You may also want to try a broad leaf evergreen, such as english laural.
    All these are cheap and fast, if watered and fertilized.
     

  3. motherearth12

    motherearth12 Member

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    since we are on the subject, any one know of a good supplier of affordable trees?
     
  4. Mid Tn Mama

    Mid Tn Mama Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I would ask on freecyle for pine tree seedlings or other evergreen seedlings. My neighbor supplies me with oodles. Why pay when you can get for free. Don't forget to offer something on freecycle first. Good luck.
     
  5. dlangland

    dlangland dlangland

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    I agree with the Eastern Red Cedar. I primarily have used little seedlings I dig up from my own properties then relocate. I never, ever have trimmed any, and some people think it's insane of me, but I have planted them as close as 4 ft. apart with no harm done for tight wind-protection and natural snow fences. I wish I knew, so I want to tag along, if possible, because after this winter, I now know where I need yet more fast-growing wind protection. Deb
     
  6. woodspirit

    woodspirit Well-Known Member

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    The needled evergreens grow faster than broadleaf evergreens. Mt laurel and rhododendrons won't like wind or road salt if they are near the road. Pines are faster than most spruces and faster tham all firs. Red pine and Austrian pine are fast and tolerant of different soil types. Wind doesn't bother them. You could use spruce like blue spruce or norway spruce but they will keep that pyramidal shape and will not grow together as well as the pines. Any shading they get from touching other trees make them more susceptible to diseases. Rhodies, azaleas and mt laurels aren't going to grow as fast or as big and wouldn't be good for wind-breaks. However if you get the Red or Austrians growing on the west side they will make the rest of your property less windy and better suited to marginal species of plants. They will stay thick right to the ground. Do not cut the lower branches off of your evergreen trees. You can't grow plants or get grass to grow under them, and if they get a heavy snow on them, they'll be more likely to break.
     
  7. mountainman_bc

    mountainman_bc Well-Known Member

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    Pines often grow to "airy" so you'll likely see cars.
    Any coniferous trees (cedars/pines) grow well but don't block sound well.
    Laurels grow fast down near the coast or any mild cimates, and having big leaves they actually block out traffic sound too. Worth looking at. To me sound would be an issue more than seeing cars. Also try evergreen magnolia if its hardy there.
    Getting them cheap? Aside from starting with tiny seedlings, drive around the country, you'll likely find little nurseries in peoples backyards.
    DON'T use "hedging cedars". If you have a p/u truck, pretend you have a landscaping business, and find a wholesaler. Say your new in business.
     
  8. Jotun

    Jotun Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all the tips, now I guess we'll se what availibility we can find locally with this new knowledge in mind and go from there. We won't go for laurels or rodadendrons though because there poisonous to goats. Thanks to everyone.
     
  9. stumpyacres

    stumpyacres Well-Known Member

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    I live in central Va. I would be glad to sell yah a few - cheap. What size do you want? PM me for phone number. Julie
     
  10. bergere

    bergere Just living Life

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    A double row of "Leland Cypress" will work. They grow very fast but easy to manage. Walmart even sells them. They are not spendy.
    "Emerald arborvitae" is another good one. It is slower growing than the Leland, but it is more dense. This cultivar will not get the yellow or brown parts in winter like other arborvitaes can.
     
  11. Pony

    Pony STILL not Alice Supporter

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    Check with your local forestry department. Many states offer free seedlings for reforestation. I google'd "free seedlings VA" and got a link for free oak seedlings:

    http://www.cnr.vt.edu/PLT/potomacshenandoah/freeseedlings.htm

    Of course, you're looking for evergreens, but you may be able to find something. A few years ago, my BIL joined (I think) the National Arbor Foundation, and got 10 free evergreen seedlings.

    Happy Hunting and Planting!

    Pony!
     
  12. woodspirit

    woodspirit Well-Known Member

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    Didn't even think of Leyland Cypress. It grows 3 feet per year. The one pine you should avoid is White Pine as that will lose its lower branches but the Red and Austrian stay full and dense tp the ground if in full sun. You'll find that all evergreens lose leaves and needles in the fall/winter. The five year old holly leaves will yellow and drop in the fall. White pine lose the 1 and a half year old needles in the fall which give them a thin appearance. Each type of evergreen has a specific number of years that the foliage will last. So the trick to growing them is to keep them growing vigorously enough that you really don't see the dead and dying growth on the inside. Some like Rhody's and Azaleas grow in semi-shade and so will never be full and dense to the ground. Look for types that need full sun and then give them full sun. Only fertilize evergreens in the spring too so that the new growth has a chance to harden off before winter, However that might not be a worry in Virginia :)
     
  13. Randy Rooster

    Randy Rooster Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Definately the leland cypress - they grow very fast and in the 1-3 gallon size are economical to buy