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notenoughtime
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Wondering if any of you take your produce to your area farmers market? What type do you take and/or do you take things that compliment your produce (recipies, on site samples - I know one person that makes breakfast burritos with her meat and eggs and sells those). Just wondering what works in different areas and is the response positive from the communities.
 

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Hi, Notenoughtime!

I never thought about taking breakfast burritos, mm those sound good right now!

In the past we have taken produce, fresh cut flowers sell really well here! I also take jams and jellies, cookies, pies sell really well also. My dd has taken carmel apples, had a lemonade stand, rice krispie treats, and cupcakes bakes in ice cream cones.

I have seen women dragging corn stalks out of the farmer's market they have bought. We have a girl who makes a fortune selling homemade egg rolls. Then there are people who bring crafts, not sure how they do but they are there every week so they must be doing ok. Honey and maple syrup are also big sellers. hope this helps! :)
 

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Retired farmer-rancher
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This is our 2nd summer doing a small local farmers market. We mostly sell tomatoes, peppers, squash, sweet corn, cukes. We did real well with sweet corn this year because a lot of others had a crop failure so we had the market to ourself. Sold out 4 weeks in a row. We also made salsa and gave out taste samples, really helped tomatoes and hot peppers sell. Others besides produce have, baked goods, jellies, herbs, cut flowers.
 

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Do farmer's markets allow you to sell home canned products? I was under the impression that anything being sold had to be made in a commercial kitchen. I would LOVE to sell some of my products that have been so well received by others.
 

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Unpaid, Volunteer Devil's Advocate
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In Michigan, you can sell fresh produce and eggs, but bread, salsa, cookies, jams, etc require an inspection of your kitchen and a license. Around here they are fairly picky about giving a license. I can sell cut flowers, but rooted plants require a Nursery License, at around $100 a year.
Fresh dug potatos, currents, whole wheat bread, eggs and fresh herbs sell well at our Farmer's Market. I've sold lots of potted daylillies, potted grape vines and hardy peach trees. You have to really like people. It seems I average 10 minutes of chatter for every baggy of green beans I sell. To sell trees, I feel like I have to give out a 15 minute horticultural short course with each sale.
 

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I sell at a market, everyone has their own thing. All of the above sell there. My specialty is "different" stuff. Heirloom tomatoes, frozen chicken, garlic, edamame, mushrooms (not wild picked), etc...People come by just to see what I have. I too do lots of talking but thats how you educate your clientele, I enjoy it. Lisa
 
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