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I'm thinking of digging a pond on my property for the purpose of raising Koi for my familys enjoyment and resale of fish for a second small income.

Does anybody have information on raising Koi in a farm pond or where I can find info. on a farm ponds specifically for this purpose.

I'm thinking that Koi only in pond, but also intertaining the idea of Bass, Cats or panfish in same pond. Will the co-habit?

Has anybody ever done this or considered it?

Any information would be greatly appreciated.
 

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the missouri conservation dept has numerous free publications about all aspects of pond building, maintenance and renovation. altho i never saw anything about koi in the ones i read. but they r free and the conservation dept will even send someone to look at ur site and make recommendations. unless u r not In missouri of course.
 

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Once talked to some folks who tried raising goldfish on this basis. They lost every one of them to herons. Goldfish, and perhaps koi, have no flight instinct from anything unusual. Thus, they are easy picking.

Bass and catfish have a name for fish like koi - lunch!

Ken S. in WC TN
 

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Gotta agree on the Koi lunch for Bass. The catfish won't do as much damage to them as bass. We have Catfish, brim and minnows (for mosquito control in our pond) and the catfish have not messed with the Brim, which are smaller than Koi. A pond for Koi needs to be deep enough to stay cool. The deeper and longer the pond the more stable the temperatures. You will need aeration to prevent algae from taking over and vegetation cover to keep the birds from making snacks of the babies. The vegetation will help filter the water. This year I am trying Tilapia and probably going to fish out the catfish which are huge and not really reproducing-
 
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How is your water supply? If you examine the Japanese koi farms, they grow koi in large ponds, then they drain them down quite a bit so they have an easier time netting them when it is harvest time. At that point, they move them to large tanks to medicate, observe and classify. A pond for enjoyment sake would be nice, but be sure to research on koi raising for a profit. Since most koi are colorful, they will attract predators so you will need protective devices to insure their safety.
 
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While carp really are good eating, most folk would rather not contend with all of the bones and would rather eat something else.
 

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Unregistered said:
While carp really are good eating, most folk would rather not contend with all of the bones and would rather eat something else.
You are right guest, the bones can be a mess. They are better cooked in a pressure cooker OR canned. Then the bones are tender like canned salmon.
 

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If you are really serious about building a decent farm pond you gotta check out www.pondboss.com they have a wealth of info over there and are very helpful in answering questions
 

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Hi:

As far as reference materials, you might look up Matson, titled something like Earth Pond Sourcebook (from memory). I know he discusses fish of various types. Frankly my recollection was not as promising as we might think, diseases, competition, regulations etc.

Bu I was lookng at it in a different way than primarily as a fish growing venue.

Good luck.

owhn
 

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Another good book to check out is Gene Logsdon's The Pond Lovers. It does not contain specific how-to information but there are some good success stories. His earlier book, Getting Food From Water is more detailed but is out of print; a library or used bookstore might be able to get it.

pondboss.com is also a good source.
 

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A Koi that would be large enough to eat could easily have a value above $100.00, depending on color and patterns. I'm not aware of the highest price ever paid for one live Koi, but I am certain it exceeds $1,000.00. I've had koi for years and large birds and Racoons can be a problem. I have aquatic plants growing over most of the pond surface which is the best protection I've found and they munch out on the tender roots.
Koi are the only fish I know that will look you in the eye in a friendly manner. That could explain why the Japanese have been keeping and breeding them for 800 years. Glen
 
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