falling in love with my new boer buckling!!!

Discussion in 'Goats' started by kidsngarden, Apr 13, 2006.

  1. kidsngarden

    kidsngarden Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    726
    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2006
    Location:
    Washington
    We got a boer buckling on tuesday and I LOVE him.

    Unfortunately our does (one La Mancha and two alpines) don't care for him much. How long before they stop bugging him? We put him in his own pen in the goat barn for now because they are so downright mean to him. I know one day he will be the dominant one, but it seems like he is withdrawing from us too because they have been so mean to him.

    Will his goat always be so great? It is so soft - softer than other kids I've felt and certainly softer than my dairy does!

    kidsngarden
     
  2. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

    Messages:
    12,669
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2005
    Location:
    MI
    They don't like him because he is a newcomer. Wait till he is bigger to put him in with them....
    Why are you putting him in with them anyway? Is he a wether or a buck?
     

  3. TexCountryWoman

    TexCountryWoman Gig'em

    Messages:
    1,198
    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2004
    Location:
    Lexington Texas area
    Congrats! No, he does not need to live with those does. Boers can come into rut any time of the year and LaMancha does and come into season at weird times too. If you want to know when your does are going to kid, don't have them all living together. Pen him separately and get him a wether to live with for company if he seems lonely or is penned far from the does. As he gets bigger, a Boer buck will be far too big and rough to live with them anyway unless they are in a big pasture where they can get away. Start building him his own VERY strong pen. Boer bucks need much stronger pens than dairy bucks do. They can smash through things with their horns when they get bigger. Have fun!
     
  4. Jcran

    Jcran Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,683
    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2006
    Location:
    Eureka, California area
    Whoever said bucks were in charge? Just like humans, it is the female who is truly the dominant one...lol...ok, at least in the goat world, in a herd situation, the male makes a lot of noise and tries to sound important, but it is the dominant female, the head doe, who decides when and where browsing, resting, etc happens. Mr. buck just follows along, talking big talk. In your situation, the girls will whomp on him for a while, then realize one day he is HOT STUFF (and make asses of themselves for a day or two). I think rutting bucks act kind of like young single bar-hoppers, and females in heat are like too many margaritas. I agree though that keeping them separate until YOU want them bred gives you more of an idea of when you'll get babies (see the other thread about the sins of having to WAIT and WAIT, not knowing when the darn girls are gonna pop)
     
  5. TexCountryWoman

    TexCountryWoman Gig'em

    Messages:
    1,198
    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2004
    Location:
    Lexington Texas area
    Absolutely! Especially if you only have a few does. You can attend every birth and the odds of saving each and every kid and each and every doe goes up tremendously.
     
  6. Paula

    Paula Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,104
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2002
    Location:
    TN
    I know I'm probably wasting my breath because the little fellow is so cute right now, but it's a bad idea to make a pet out of a buck. When he's 2 he won't be so cute, and he'll think of you as one of "his" does if he's a pet.
    How do I know this? I learn from my mistakes, LOL. A few years ago we had a Boer herd. The buck was about 3 months old when we bought the herd. He was so cute. Then one day in the pasture (he was mostly grown by now, I'd say about 130-140 lbs) I was petting him and he turned into a monster. He gouged my legs with his horns and stuck out his icky little you-know-what and AIMED it at me! YUCK! He bruised my legs up good. From that day on I had to carry a big stick with me if I went in the pasture. Had to knock him in the head with it a few times too, though it didn't slow him down much.
    A friend at work got some Boers a couple years ago and was telling me how nice the little buck was. I told her my experience. She didn't believe her buck would turn out like that as he was so well behaved. Ha. She's been keeping me up to date on the goats all along, and the buck has been increasingly difficult to handle, although she still didn't see it causing major problems. About a month ago she told me she had to hit him in the head with a hammer to get him off her. She was fixing fence, he attacked her, and she just knocked him with what she had in her hand to get him off her. Apparently a hammer makes more of an impression than a big stick, he has mostly backed off. But she still has to carry something in her hand when she goes into the pasture, he wants to act up if she goes in empty handed.
     
  7. dosthouhavemilk

    dosthouhavemilk Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    2,174
    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2004
    Location:
    SE Ohio
    Above all, hand raised bucks need to be taught to respect you. Espsically if you are female who is going to be handling them. That time of the month will bring out the bad side in them!
    William is a Boer/Saanen and is three this year. I was so pleased with him this afternoon. I had him by the collar and Bo (the two year old Boer buck) by the collar. Led them to the pasture I wanted to put them in. William was the gentlemen, I didn't need to pull him in either direction, he walked along side me the entire way. Bo...well, I've had him for one year and for half that year he was recovering from having his rear tendons ripped out by dogs, so needless to say, he isn't quite as trained but he behaved well and only needed a little tugging. I then went back to get Rudy, our yearling Nubian. He needs some training still as well. All three were handraised (William and Rudy by me). All three respect me and my position. So far, so good. William was raised with Charlie (Boer/Alpine/Togg) his half brother. Two winters ago when I had to chose which one to sell there was no contest. Charlie went because he was already aggressive with me and would not show me the respect I expected. I will not tolerate aggressive animals. Period. Especially aggressive males. Of course, I live on a Jersey dairy farm and we've raised Jersey breeding bulls in the past so this is all deeply instilled in my thinking. You don't ever turn your back on an intact male and always be ready for the day they turn.

    They can be your friend, but above all else, you need to instill in him that you are the boss and he is to respect your wishes.

    I can't believe how soft their hair is either! We have our first 5/8 Boer kids and they are so soft. Bo is fairly soft still at two years old. Much softer than William.
     
  8. KSALguy

    KSALguy Lost in the Wiregrass Supporter

    Messages:
    8,821
    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2006
    Location:
    S.E.Alabama
    i had a 375 lb boer buck that thought he was KING ofthe WORLD and would try to kill me, LITTERALY by standing on his hind leggs and trying to head butt me, sence i dont have big knarly horns i was SOL and had to arm my self with eather a water hose or a battery opperated cattle prod to keep him from knocking my brains out.
    on the up side he through some of the best kids ever, but was also MAJOR PAIN when it came to keeping good fences
     
  9. TexCountryWoman

    TexCountryWoman Gig'em

    Messages:
    1,198
    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2004
    Location:
    Lexington Texas area
    I was just fixin to say that a water hose is real good, or a spray bottle of water (will help with some bucks and most does). During rut, my Boer buck rears up too and looks like a killer. I was never afraid of him til this year. He was in rut and we were in the pen worming the does. He was spending some time in with them to breed. He started acting a fool and i was running around trying to get away from him, not the best strategy. And I'M NOT AFRAID OF ANYTHING! This scared my husband when he saw THAT I WAS AFRAID of the dang buck! We never did get that buck wormed that go round. Months later, when he was outta rut, we trimmed his hooves and wormed him, he was much better and more of a gentleman. He has got me with his horns in the past, through my jeans and into my thigh, cutting me open and making me bleed. Quite a contrast to my big LaMancha buck who i can walk right up to in rut and give a shot to by myself and he doesn't even move a muscle.
     
  10. kidsngarden

    kidsngarden Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    726
    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2006
    Location:
    Washington
    I think I will get a whether for him so he doesn't cry do much about being alone. He's just a little guy and like my does has been disbudded. We are getting him his own space but figured while we are waiting he could be with the does since for him to get his thing up to them would be a feat!!! he may be able to mount my smaller doe, but the other ones - no way!!!

    I thought it would be in our best interest to get him while he is young to like us so he wouldn't be so hard to deal with later. Our does totally respect us because we don't tolerate jumping up and such, we thought the same would be true with him, but we would need a firmer approach. Wrong???

    Bethany
     
  11. TexCountryWoman

    TexCountryWoman Gig'em

    Messages:
    1,198
    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2004
    Location:
    Lexington Texas area
    Great that he is disbudded if you are not going to show him. Not sure, but i think Boer bucks are supposed to have there horns to meet show standards. But if you just have him for breeding, that will REALLY help. I would get him a wether of similar size, one her can live with forever. if it doesn't work out, butcher the wether. Young bucklings are sexually mature VERY early, as young as just a few months old. They can reach even when you think they can't sometimes if the doe is willing. It is my personal belief, from what I have seen with my own goats, that Boer bucklings mature even earlier than dairy breeds, so keep an eye out for that. I think you may have an easier time with yours without the horns. Any goat with horns, male or female, becomes more aggressive. They feel their POWER!
     
  12. kidsngarden

    kidsngarden Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    726
    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2006
    Location:
    Washington
    No, we are not showing him. Yes, those horns bring power - we just had a doe that we had to get rid of (had her just a month) because she was wild and had horns so the other does didn't like her at all - they just would not accept her! NO more horns at our farm

    kidsngarden