Fall edibles

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by tnborn, Nov 1, 2005.

  1. tnborn

    tnborn Well-Known Member

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    Hi, I was wondering what else can I harvest for fall?Walnuts, hickories, maple syrup. It is a cool one today :happy:
    tnborn
     
  2. EasyDay

    EasyDay Gimme a YAAAAY!

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    Do you have persimmons or muscadines?
     

  3. tnborn

    tnborn Well-Known Member

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    Yes, we do. Thank you easy day. I would like to harvest more from the land this year than the past ones.Thanks again.
    tnborn
     
  4. walkinghorse

    walkinghorse Active Member

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    sumac berries ,freeze now , good lemonade in the winter.
     
  5. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    Don't be tapping any maple trees in the fall onaccount you're not gonna get much sap and you're libel to kill the tree. Do your tapping in the spring.
     
  6. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Bluegill.

    A little raw meat dipped in tuna is the most AMAZING bait for bluegill!
     
  7. Charleen

    Charleen www.HarperHillFarm.com Supporter

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    We dig horseradish roots in the fall.
     
  8. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Don't forget the acorns.
     
  9. whodunit

    whodunit Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Mushrooms? We have shaggy manes (sp?)

    Mrs Whodunit
     
  10. gladetop

    gladetop Well-Known Member

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    Antler or Coral Mushrooms
    mix with egg and bread crums and make into pattys and fry.
     
  11. KRH

    KRH Resident Wino

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    Paw Paws, Elderberries, and Jeruselam Artichokes.
     
  12. Jenn

    Jenn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Can you grow hazelnuts/filberts there?
     
  13. cowgirlone

    cowgirlone Well-Known Member

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    We harvest echinacea in the fall. I dry the roots for use in tea over the winter. Seems to keep colds and flu away.
     
  14. albionjessica

    albionjessica Hiccoughs after eating

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    Sumac berries? What are those? I thought I learned that sumacs are toxic in a plant anatomy course I took.
     
  15. JAK

    JAK Well-Known Member

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    Nuts. Rosehips. You can still grow spinach.

    Good question about Maple Syrup. I don't think it would kill the tree. It might be too bitter and too low in sugar , as it is in Late Spring once the leaves start forming. In theory, you might be able to get Maple Syrup in an Indian Summer, or a January Thaw, if the tree gets tricked into thinking it is Spring. Taking a little sap will not harm the tree. Getting tricked by the weather does harm the tree, but that is not your fault.

    What I am not sure is where all the sugar comes from that is in the sap in Spring. Up to 2% sugar. My guess is that the leaves give up their sugar to the tree before the leaves fall. The tree sends this sap down to the roots when the temperature falls below freezing. I am not sure if any new sugar forms during the winter through some reaction in the roots. I don't think so. What might happen is during the winter the tree and roots lose some moisture and this makes the sap more concentrated in the Spring. Daytime/Nighttime temperature swings from below freezing to above freezing make the sap flow faster, but in theory this should work just as well Spring or Fall. The sap is just not as good in the Fall. Not sure why. Either to dilute, or too bitter, or both.

    Don't be afraid to try anything and discover for yourself.
     
  16. Mike in Ohio

    Mike in Ohio Well-Known Member

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    It's sang (ginsing) time. Do check the laws in your state on harvesting.

    Mike
     
  17. KRH

    KRH Resident Wino

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    Albionjessica,
    Sumac berries are the red flower tops from Staghorn Sumac. The hairy pods are stripped from the stems and soaked in cold water untill it takes on the color of pink lemonaid. (Which is exactly what it tastes like.) Then strain off the berries, (I use a coffee filter) and sweeten to taste. Try to harvest them after a long dry spell as rain will wash of a lot of the acids and give a less flavorful drink.