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I got 2nd at fair with my Sr. alpine doe! I'm so proud of her, she's such a good doe!

I'm surprised at the number of milking does that have lopsided udders at a 4h show! Every single other doe I saw besides one had a very noticeable lopsided udder. Even the two I showed against. One the third place doe in my class, the udder was large but pendulous and very lopsided, and on the other it looked like it might be a good udder but poorly taken care of... and plus it's legs were interesting to say the least. But I'm not extremely unhappy with my placing. We had fun and it was my first show ever. I was the oldest in the novice class. :)

Oh, and the cutest little girl came up, she was like 5 or 6, and asked if she could show my doe in the peewee class. Of cource I let her and helped her out, and Dance (the doe) was just an angel for the child. I've also taught another little girl how to milk, too.

My doe had been shown before so she pretty much did what she needed to do and I just posed her. I was surprised at how calm and well behaved she was throughout. All in all it was fun, and I think I'll start going to and watching some ADGA shows so maybe I can do that in the future.

No one warned me that goats would be so addicting way back when I was 11 and got my first goat. Shouldn't they come with some sort of label or warning? hehe. Did I mention I was only allowed to have just the one goat? Hah. I'm up to 17... I think. My numbers get all messed up around kidding season. :)

anywho, I'm having a grand old time at fair.
 

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The legs were interesting how?

The sad thing about those lopsided udders is that they probably weren't always like that. In fact, well cared for, they could be balanced next spring. You have to start milking the doe the same day she gives birth, and keep it up at least once a day even if the kids are nursing...not just "empty it out if it seems full". That does nothing to prevent the lopsidedness. Oh, they may have had mastitis at some point, but I'm guessing that it's just a case of having dam raised and not milking until the kids were half grown. It wrecks the udder.

(And I know...a whole host of people are goign to post now saying that they hardly milked their doe until her kids were gone, and look! her udder is fine....but in the years I've been on this forum, I have seen it so many times I'm sick of it: "why is my doe's udder lopsided??")
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't know terminology, but either she posed funny or her legs weren't right... Even my dad, the goat 'dummy', wondered how she was mobile... Well, maybe they weren't THAT bad, but it's sad when my dad notices those things. I didn't get as good of a look at her as I would've wished. I think her front feet might've pointed inward or something, and her back legs might have been posty (is that the right term?) I just know the udders were horrible. I take my dairy doe's kids right off at birth and milk 2x per day every day. I have one doe that is a heavy milker. Last year she was a FF and she had a single buckling. The previous owner didn't milk her out and her one had bagged up and had a blowout, so her udder is lopsided and I wouldn't show her... but apparently you can still win in 4h shows! But overall it was fun and I will do it next year... though it will be my last year able to show at 4-h. (I'm a senior next year)
 

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Often if a doe is overuddered, her rear legs will splay out somewhat and she almost waddles as she walks. The legs are OK< it's just that her udder is too full.

If a doe has legs that are posty, they are too straight at the angle of the hock. From hips to ankle, the legs looks fairly stright. A posty goat has a characteristic gait. Postiness is a problem because it gets worse with each year and causes pain to the goat. If you have a kid or yearling that's posty, might as well get rid of her now, it'll get worse with each year. A older doe (8, 12,15) that is posty is a different story, because teh joint straighten out with age. This is why good angulation is important- it can extend the life of your doe and give her a few extra years of mobility.

Hocky is when the hocks point towards each other when viewed from the rear. This causes the back feet to point out. Hocky goats climb hills better. Hockiness is one of my pet peeves, to me it makes a goat look trashy. The hocks get in the way of the udder and cause mechanical irritation. Still, if the goat has good angulation in the rear leg, hockiness doesn't really shorten her life like postiness can.

It is possible for a goat to have both faults.

Then there are does whose legs are bowed over. The leg bends forward. The joints are giving out.

In my mind, the front leg should be fairly straight from elbow to ankle and teh foot should point straight forward. The rear leg should look almost like a backwards question mark. ? Well, without the continuing curl at the top....There should be a definite angle to the hock, the thigh is curved to support this angle and demonstrate dairiness. From the hock to the ankle, the leg should be perpendicular to the ground or possibly slightly angled, when the foot is placed solidly beneath the goat so that a plumb line from the pin to the foot would be straight with the leg matching up with it.
 

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Congratulations!! You should be quite proud, that represents a lot of hard work!

I attended our county fair last week, the first time in years. A goaty friend called me and we went together. It was shocking.

First they had the showmanship, then dairy goats then market goats. 96% of the animals there were boers or boer crosses.

The dairy animals were pitiful. There was not one respectable dairy animal there. The judge handled it very well. During the judging, she simply made NO mention of the mammery system. I mean, what could she say? At the end she discussed a proper udder. Now were talking about one or two animals in each class, mainly one. Three of the approx. 10 dairy animals had some sort of udder. The other 7 had never freshened!!!. Two udders where shriveled and quite uneven, clearly they had no milk in them. The other doe had a grotesque udder, hugh, with even hugher teats. My hands were cramping just looking at the udder. The poor udder was almost on the ground. Clearly no ones understands dairy goats in the local 4'h program.
 

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Yes, I am surprised at the number of dairy goats there that had never freshened! And the udders... *shudder*. One alpine/ober cross (or something like that( had an udder that looked rather like a pear... Very small attachment area, maybe like a large orange size attachment area, with a pretty large and extremely pendulous udder.
 
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