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This looks a bit odd to me: [ame]http://www.ebaumsworld.com/video/watch/429/[/ame]
 

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Dunno what's odd about it, there is such a thing. Look up "mytotonic" on the Net. They use that word for them now that they are $200-300. LOL. I owned mine when they were "fainters," and $40 a pop.

Often you can clap your hands and they will fall over. I have owned them, they make GREAT predator food!

The festival is right up the road from me in Lewsiburg, TN. The breed by legend originated in Marshall County, TN. We went one year to the fest, it was a blast. They sell goat meat meals, too....mmmmm...I may have to go again!

Now a funny story. I met a man here who had a fencing job up in the north of my county, up by Lewisburg way. He brought his tractor and hydraulic driver up there. The pasture was full of goats. He paid them no mind. He lined up a post and hit it .... WHUMP! ... and all the goats fell over.

"I thought, 'I done killed them all!'" he told me. "I'll never be able to pay for 'em all with what I'm getting from this job! What am I gonna do???"

Just about then, one by one, they all started standing back up. Man was he RELIEVED!

I learned when I owned them, though, that a bobcat doesn't give them the chance ever to stand back up.

UNDER EDIT: Now that I think about it, only the college girls kissing in the ad up top was odd on that site! LOLOL.
 

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NOOO definitely not bad for laughing! I have 30 of 'em out here and one day I'm going to film them running down the mountainside to the 'heidi' theme and scratch stop the record when they all tumble over cause they are so dern excited to see me! Keeps things interesting. They are so friendly and easy though.

They do serve a significant purpose in the meat goat world - they have excellent muscling, and great taste - they are easier to raise in an organic style environment than a lot of the other breeds without the scoundrel type attitudes of say, Spanish goats (grrr grumble grumble - lost some fenceline to a Fainter whose line is prevalently Spanish, and found out this is the norm). I keep 3' fencing so that's kept my costs down dramatically, esp now I'm fencing in three new large mountainside areas.

Downfall - as Jim has said, predators. Herding dogs can be a problem as well.

Jim, there are still $50-75 nervous goats out there :) Esp with hay issues now - but with all animals you get what you pay for. Not too many farms down there in Marshall without cl now, and there have been some cases of Johnes from a few commercial breeders. Although, I have to admit, they are cleaning up a lot, buying into autogenous vax, testing (hence raising prices because we all know testing is $20 at least) Boys moving out to Thompsen's Station are going for $75 at the farm...saves the producer the gas and time. For me to sell an animal for less than I can get for it's meat is well, silly! If you go to Goats Music and More (don't forget the Boer show too) - I will meet up with you! I LOVE it! I got addicted 2 years ago - my wether Amos won his class - I can't show anymore, unless I'm selling the animal (closed herd), but I love the festival! And TN folks are the best.

Andrea
 

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We got our first goat from a rescue site so had no idea of her background. She never showed any sign of fainting. But we have one of her kids now! Yup you guessed it, he is a fainter!! My husband just loves it. We were not planning on keeping any of the billys this time, but he is just too cute~ So we wethered him and he is entertainment for my husband.
Hubby goes out and acts like he is giong to chase the goat, the goat falls over, hubby laughs goat jumps up and runs away!!! Entertainment on the farm. Wish we had known he was a fainter before we wethered him!!

Alice in Virginia
 

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We used to have one. The other goats figured her out REAL quick! They would look at us with a whimsical look on their face - as if to say - "watch THIS!". Then they would head butt the fainter and walk away laughing as she got stiff and fell over....
 

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Alice in Virginia, it is a double-recessive trait, so you would have had to have bred him to a doe with the gene as well.
 

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Actually, I've been finding through research and practical application it's autosomal dominant. You can breed a fainter to a non fainter, as long as (for kicks and giggles) FF (faints) -- other phenotypes would be ff (not faints) Ff(faints) - and get a fainting goat. I have also seen people breed fainters to fainters and get - NOT FAINTERS! I've got one boy here who is true blue TN Marshall co, closed herd forever, back to Mr Oliver - and ANYTHING you put him on produces a fainting goat. I can put money on it. BUT just cause it faints, doesn't mean it's a fainter...<sigh> that also depends on who you ask.

The recessive version of myotonia congenita is sex linked. It's quite possible these goats don't have 'myotonia congenita' but another myotonic condition, but that's a whooollleee nother ball of wax (I'm working with U of P to get some testing done) :)

:)

Andrea
 
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