F-150 payload?

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by MelissaW, Nov 5, 2006.

  1. MelissaW

    MelissaW Well-Known Member

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    We have a half-ton Ford F-150 that is 4WD and has the off road package. It's got the big block 6, and 31 inch tires. We would like to use it with a slide in camper that weighs 1700 pounds. The owners manual does not say exactly how much weight the truck can handle. Does anybody have an opinion as to whether or not the truck can handle it? Do we need extra springs added or air shocks in the back? Thanks for your input!
     
  2. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    1700lbs is a lot of weight for an F-150 to drive around with in the back. I've had 2,000lbs in the back of mine and it's not in there long and I wouldn't drive far with it in there. The other big factor with a slide in is the height being effected by wind. The weight carrying capacity of your tires is important as much or more than the springs.
     

  3. pgmr

    pgmr Member

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    The manual should give you the GVWR (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating), which is the maximum total for the truck, passengers and stuff. You'll have to weigh the truck as is, estimate the other stuff you'd have with you and then add the 1700 lbs. If you are over the GVWR limit, you'll probably want to either look at a lighter slide in, a heavier duty truck or look at pulling a trailer instead.
     
  4. sleeps723

    sleeps723 Well-Known Member

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    there is a sticker inside the door frame on the drivers side which lists the truck weight and the weight it can carry, the weight it lists as it can carry is the max
     
  5. MelissaW

    MelissaW Well-Known Member

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    Thanks all! The GVWR is 6250, but it also says the front GAWR is 2950, and the rear GAWR is 3776. Problem is, it doesn't say the weight of the vehicle empty anywhere.
     
  6. lonelytree

    lonelytree Guest

    I have a Fleetwood Angler that weighs about the same. They advertise that it will work in a 1/2 ton truck. So if you take a 1/2 ton truck and add overload bags and stabilizers it will hold the 1700 pounds. Now add 4 sleeping bags, 20 gallons of water at 7 pounds per, gray water, black water, a fridge full of food, basic toolkit, a cooler of beer, fishing gear, toiletries, etc..... You are now overweight. Brakes wear out fast (or fail), tires are not up to the load so they blow, the transmission overheats and you strain the motor.

    I had mine in a 99 Superduty. It was wearing it out FAST. I also pulled a boat or ATV trailer (about 2200 pounds). I now have a 2500 Dodge with a Cummins. Better mileage, and the brakes and suspension for the task.

    Your engine is not strong enough. Your suspension will need overload bags as a minimum. The front end will require rebuilding in a short time. By the time you invenst into all these things, you could go out and buy a decent 3/4 or 1 ton truck.
     
  7. sleeps723

    sleeps723 Well-Known Member

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    my 89 is for 5400 and my 96 n 97 are 6100. u always could put stiffer overload springs on the rear axle. to much constant weight will weaken the springs and cause them to break over or the springs to actually break
     
  8. MelissaW

    MelissaW Well-Known Member

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    Excellent info. Thank you! The camper is an excellent deal, and we are in the market for a newer, bigger truck. It would only has to make it 10 miles or so home, so it wouldn't be that far. Since we hate to pass it up, maybe we will bring it home on the current truck, and set it up in the barn (off of the truck), until we find the truck we are looking for. Your input is much appreciated!
     
  9. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You could put the pickup camper in a two wheel trailer made from a pickup bed, and use most any truck to pull it. That way you would never have to mount the camper on and off your truck.
     
  10. HermitJohn

    HermitJohn Well-Known Member

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    Yes what Uncle Will said, thats only way I would use a half ton with a slide in camper. Half ton has much lighter springs and frame, it will feel twitchy on the road and not be terribly safe. For slide in campers I would think 3/4 ton minimum and personally I'd get a one ton if dragging it cross country since they are plentiful anymore and would make everything feel very stable.
     
  11. CatsPaw

    CatsPaw Who...me?

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    Yea, what everybody said. Also, you have to remember that it isn't just the springs....it's the tires, wheel bearings, brakes, drive train, etc. They're all made for 1/2 ton, not more. You'd be pushing the limits of the brakes I bet. They'll wear out really fast.

    Yea, I'd wait and get the proper size truck rather than pushing the limits of an undersized truck.
     
  12. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    Unfortunately most that tried this would make the trailer from a 1/2 ton pickup and be in the same or worse boat that before. especially since most that make trailers like these leave off an important feature, brakes. If you think a 1/2 ton pickups brakes are inadequate to carry the weight just try putting it behind it on a lever and see what it does.
     
  13. MelissaW

    MelissaW Well-Known Member

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    Well, the trailer is a good idea, but that would be defeating the purpose of switching from the trailer we have now to a slide in. We already put plates on three vehicles and a heavy equipment trailer. Not having to buy them for the camper will be a nice change! DH wants to get at least a 3/4 or a one ton with an 8 foot bed and a crew cab and 4wd. I think he would also prefer a diesel. Our neighbor is thinking of selling his big dually, which would be ideal. Of course, buying license plates for a truck like THAT is enough to make a person faint. Hopefully the truck we have will suit to bring the camper home. We still have to find the tie downs. We won't be going anywhere until next summer anyway, so that gives us a few months to find a big truck. You've convinced us that the truck we have now won't do! Anybody got a truck to trade for a backhoe?