Expert advice needed

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by Hip_Shot_Hanna, Jan 17, 2007.

  1. Hip_Shot_Hanna

    Hip_Shot_Hanna Well-Known Member

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    OK I am new to Wells , how do you pull a well pump , we have a pump at around 70 feet in a 4 inch well pipe, by the wiring it's a 220 volt pump , there is a plate bolted to the top of the well pipe with 4 bolts, which the wires go thru and the 2 in steel pipe comes out of , part of the well house roof comes off I spose to crane the pump out , if this thing ever quits where do i start to pull the thing ?
     
  2. Dianol

    Dianol Well-Known Member

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    Louisiana
    Okay, my dh will answer this on- Dianne

    dh;
    Follow this process, keeping in mind that you'll have to adapt to your specific installation;
    1. Turn off the breaker, and lock it out if possible. If not possible, pull the breaker out. Yes, it's 220 volt
    2. Disconnect the pipe above the plate. There should be a union or some fitting that allows you to disconnect it from the pressure tank. If not you'll have to cut it.
    3. Unbolt the flange, and determine what kind of pipe you have. It may be a semi-flexible black plastic pipe that you can pull and aim out the door or window. Or you may have to create roof clearance as you indicate. There should be a nylon rope anchored off just below that plate. Find it, and use it to pull everything.
    4. The submersible pump, pipe, and wire can be kind of heavy. I have pulled them alone, but it's nice to have help.
    5. Locate the nylon rope, and start lifting it out. It's all just hanging there. It's also prudent to have something located that you can wrap the rope around as you pull it. A half hitch around a bolted down 2x4 or something sturdy is nice. This way, when you get tired half way up, you can cinch off the rope and catch your breath. I have also used a pulley at the top of the building, and ran rope out to my truck. Just have to be careful, cuz it's more difficult to tell if things get hung up. Your're truck will easily pull the rope in half, then everything drops to the bottom of the well, and you have to hire a fishing company to extract it. $$$$
    6. The pump will eventually come to the top. Just lift it out onto the ground or backyard, or whereever makes sense. At this point, it's not near as heavy as when you first started.
    7. Reverse the process with your new pump. I would recommend that you replace the wire, pipe and rope, or at least inspect the old stuff closely. Experience suggests that you are usually money, time, and frustration ahead to replace it.
    8. Also, have you been getting any sand in your water? If so, you will want to bring in a well driller to "blow" the well out with high pressure air. It's not hard to do; it just takes a big air compressor, and a couple of special fittings, but it does restore the well's capacity.

    I'm not a well driller, or an expert, but I've pulled my own, and replaced pumps, pipe, wireing etc... in a 170 foot well in south texas, and I've helped friends replace/repair their wells many times.

    Hope this helps

    Good Luck

    David (using my sweet DW's login)
     

  3. farminghandyman

    farminghandyman Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Colorado
    If your dealing with steel pipe you will need some type of tower or tripod frame over the well taller than the length of pipe by about 5 foot, two good 24 Inch pipe wrenches, and some some type of tool to connect to the pipe, (there are a number of different types of tools, some are called elevators and work in pairs, some are a clamp type of thing, some are a special hook,) and a block and tackle or a good pulley and then a lower pulley and a winch or a strong rope tied to the front of a truck, (why the front of it, you ask, so you can see what your doing, as you back up and pull the pipe up joint by joint,),

    some type of pipe safety, to keep the pipe from falling back in the well, and possibly a pipe vice to attach to the pipe as an extra safety, (usual called pipe dogs or well dogs),

    my advice is to to call a well service person and have it done professionally, unless you have some experience, (or at least watched one pulled).


    pipe pulling tools can be found on the link below,

    http://www.aermotorwindmills.com/pipe-tools.htm
     
  4. Gideon

    Gideon Well-Known Member

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    I seriously doubt that it is galvanized pipe to a submersible but if it is I certainly would not reuse it. Go to black plastic as it is much easier to handle. Make sure to use the "spacer disks" on your pipe to keep them from rubbing holes when the pump "wiggles" when it cuts on and off. At 70' you should have no trouble pulling it out with just another to help-the more the merrier though. Anytime I do plumbing I add cutoffs everywhere in case of future leaks. I hate to shut down every thing for a leak in the far end of our home. Plus, if in an emergency(or procrastination) you can still flush one bathroom easily. Hope your problem is merely a pinhole in the pipe, wc
     
  5. farminghandyman

    farminghandyman Well-Known Member Supporter

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    in our area I have never seen or heard of a sub pump put down with poly pipe, (I know it is done in many areas) and both of my wells are steel pipe, but both of mine are over 280' deep.
     
  6. crafty2002

    crafty2002 Well-Known Member

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    Aug 23, 2006
    Location:
    South central Virgina
    I grew up drilling wells more than 40 years ago. Well I started learning to back then as a kid any way.
    We never used anything but black plastic pipe but I have pulled pumps that had galvanized and even black iron pipe. I am sure if your well pump isn't that old, it will be black plastic pipe and that isn't that hard to remove.
    You need to LOOSEN the four bolts. Some older well caps have nuts on the bottom side that fit into impressions that are made so when you loosen them they will slide out of the impression and will just turn when it is loose enough, but sometimes they are stuck and if you take the bolt all the way out, as soon as you start removeing the pump they may come loose and fall and wedge inbetween the pump and caseing and that is not fun. Been there.
    If it is plastic, after you loosen the bolts start pulling it by grabing the 90 in the well cap. As soon as you can, grab the plastic pipe. Don't use the rope unless you have to. It may be frayed from vibrations or even rotted and if you are holding it this way and it breaks the whole thing can end up in the well short of the cap itself.
    The rope is for incase the pump disconnects from the pipe and it's only a saftey rope. They use rope in them that isn't big enough to pull pump, pipe and all. Just the pump.
    As soon as you get the cap up and coming out have someone else walk it away from you as you keep pulling the pump up and if it is only 70 feet you shouldn't have to stop before you get it out. It gets a lot lighter as it comes out.

    Look at the wires to see if there is any wore places in them from vibration. If not resuse as is. That stuff cost a lot of money to throw away.
    If there is a worn place, cut out the bad area, strip it 1/2" and use sta-cons to put it back together. Use rubber pump tape to tape it back up and this tape is designed to be strechted so it gets a good water tight covering.
    Add any new wire you may need at the top of the well and do as above.

    If it has plastic pipe, reuse it. That stuff never goes bad unless it frezzes and that won't happen inside a well casing.

    If you have either of the metal pipes you are in for a treat if you decide to pull it. If it is only 70 feet I don't guess it would be tooooo bad, but all the ones I pulled with steel pipe were over 200 feet deep.
    We had wood chocks made out of 4" x 4" oak with v notches cut in the center to hold the pipe and two bolts that were 5/8" to tighten it up on the pipe.
    We had a tripod that was made out of 2" pipe with plates and spikes welded on the end of it and an electric winch we would hang from it to pull steel pipe with.
    I would suggest if it is steel pipe, calling a well driller unless you have some pipe to build a tri-pod with, or even 4" x 4"'s could be used, and at least a come along or wench.
    The pump plus the pipe is heavy and you have to stop at every joint to discconnect it and have to have some way of holding it there while doing so. Now they have gadgets with rubber tires on it that sets on the caseing and as the wheels turn the pipe comes up.
    I have pulled more pumps than I have fingers and toes. Plastic pipe, they aren't bad. Iron pipe is a night mare.
    Good luck and God bless
     
  7. crafty2002

    crafty2002 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,137
    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2006
    Location:
    South central Virgina
    I grew up drilling wells more than 40 years ago. Well I started learning to back then as a kid any way.
    We never used anything but black plastic pipe but I have pulled pumps that had galvanized and even black iron pipe. I am sure if your well pump isn't that old, it will be black plastic pipe and that isn't that hard to remove.
    You need to LOOSEN the four bolts. Some older well caps have nuts on the bottom side that fit into impressions that are made so when you loosen them they will slide out of the impression and will just turn when it is loose enough, but sometimes they are stuck and if you take the bolt all the way out, as soon as you start removeing the pump they may come loose and fall and wedge inbetween the pump and caseing and that is not fun. Been there.
    If it is plastic, after you loosen the bolts start pulling it by grabing the 90 in the well cap. As soon as you can, grab the plastic pipe. Don't use the rope unless you have to. It may be frayed from vibrations or even rotted and if you are holding it this way and it breaks the whole thing can end up in the well short of the cap itself. Plus the well cap can kill you if it comes by as fast as it will be going back into the well. :baby04:
    The rope is for incase the pump disconnects from the pipe and it's only a saftey rope. Most drillers use rope in them that isn't big enough to pull pump, pipe and all. Just the pump.
    As soon as you get the cap up and coming out have someone else walk it away from you as you keep pulling the pump up and if it is only 70 feet you shouldn't have to stop before you get it out. It gets a lot lighter as it comes out.

    Look at the wires to see if there is any wore places in them from vibration. If not resuse as is. That stuff cost a lot of money to throw away.
    If there is a worn place, cut out the bad area, strip it 1/2" and use sta-cons to put it back together. Use rubber pump tape to tape it back up and this tape is designed to be strechted so it gets a good water tight covering.
    Add any new wire you may need at the top of the well and do as above.

    If it has plastic pipe, reuse it. That stuff never goes bad unless it frezzes and that won't happen inside a well casing.

    If you have either of the metal pipes you are in for a treat if you decide to pull it. If it is only 70 feet I don't guess it would be tooooo bad, but all the ones I pulled with steel pipe were over 200 feet deep.
    We had wood chocks made out of 4" x 4" oak with v notches cut in the center to hold the pipe and two bolts that were 5/8" to tighten it up on the pipe.
    We had a tripod that was made out of 2" pipe with plates and spikes welded on the end of it and an electric winch we would hang from it to pull steel pipe with.
    I would suggest if it is steel pipe, calling a well driller unless you have some pipe to build a tri-pod with, or even 4" x 4"'s could be used, and at least a come along or wench.
    The pump plus the pipe is heavy and you have to stop at every joint to discconnect it and have to have some way of holding it there while doing so. Now they have gadgets with rubber tires on it that sets on the caseing and as the wheels turn the pipe comes up.
    I have pulled more pumps than I have fingers and toes. Plastic pipe, they aren't bad. Iron pipe is a night mare.
    Good luck and God bless
     
  8. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Just a strong hint. Disconnect the discharge pipes leaving the well. Do as crafty suggested with the loosening of the well casing adapter. Then attempt to lift everything. If you cannot manage the lift with a level of control or without excessive strain call a service person. If the weight is managable, go for it!
     
  9. Hip_Shot_Hanna

    Hip_Shot_Hanna Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Texas
    thank you all for your advice , the place we bought has only been here 7 years so with luck the pump will last a while AND it will be piped with plastic ,
    As a retired truck mechanic i am fairly handy with tools and lifting heavy things ,but i had no idea how the pump is fitted I never thought they would hang it off the pipe , I am used to everything bolted down SOLID not left dangling ,lol .without ever seeing one pulled I could'nt figure out how they stoped the torque down the hole looks like they dont bother about it ,

    Again thank you for all your advice , it seems easier than i thought it would be , and a lot easier than a D9 torque converter :)
     
  10. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Location:
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    A properly installed submersible pump will have a torque arrestor right above the motor. The torque has been know to create problems with the plumbing and the wiring.
     
  11. boonieman

    boonieman Well-Known Member

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    Dec 27, 2005
    Location:
    Meade Co Kentucky
    I've pulled my well too, and replaced all the piping, pump, wiring. My well is 165 feet deep and it had 1" galvanized pipe and that's what I put back in, all new. From the recommendations I've seen, 300' is the limit for using poly pipe, deeper than that, steel. I'm quite sure folks have successfully used it deeper than that, I'm just saying what the recommendation is.

    A couple things: There should be a tee on the top of your pipe where it comes out of the well, most likely 1" for domestic. The tee should have a pipe plug in the top of it. Before you start disconnecting any piping, take the plug out and screw in a length of pipe long enough to come above your well casing. Attached a pipe dog to this piece of pipe, or pipe clamp across the top of your well casing. This is a safety so when you start disconnecting your discharge piping you won't drop your well piping and pump down into the well.

    When you start re-installing all your piping, etc spray it liberally with bleach water as you go. This disinfects everything before it goes back in the well.

    good luck
     
  12. countrymech

    countrymech Well-Known Member

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    Nov 28, 2005
    Location:
    Central Wyoming
    When we have worked on our well, I threaded a second tee into the top with 2 six inch nipples threaded into the sides to make a tee handle. It makes ia convenient handhold and also makes a great safety stop if it gets away from you. Great advice on the bleach by the way. Spray very liberally. Good luck, Paul.