Expensive Tools!

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by Cabin Fever, Dec 27, 2006.

  1. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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  2. dagwood

    dagwood Well-Known Member

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    American made=Union labor=high prices.
     

  3. hunter63

    hunter63 Well-Known Member

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    By looking at them, they look heavy, thick. This not necessarily a good thing.
    Looks to me like it's finally happened. Using the Made in U.S.A. label to demand high prices.

    If you want the best, buy Snap-on. Will probably be the same money, but not only are they strong, tight tolerances, but thin, (to fit in tight places).
    Ask your auto dealers mechanics what they use. (if they could)

    By clicking on the thumbnail, looking at the bigger picture, these are not Snap-on.
     
  4. morrowsmowers

    morrowsmowers Well-Known Member

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    They say they are made in the same factory as the "tool truck" tools. This is an advertising ploy making you think they are Snap-On or Matco tools. For that price they should be but they are not. They also say you can save about $23 by joining their buyers club. You can save even more by not buying these! You can get Snap-On tools on ebay and then you won't have to wonder what factory they are made in.

    Ken in Glassboro, NJ :)
     
  5. idahodave

    idahodave Well-Known Member

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    In the picture they are labeled BAHCO...I found a few listings for BAHCO by Snap-on, one was a 16 piece set for $119 with a list price of $322. Looks like the same thing, but still too rich for me.
     
  6. hunter63

    hunter63 Well-Known Member

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    Some of the Snap-on tools were made right here in Kenosha, WI, and the International Headquarters is still here.
    Key word is "were", the manufacturing plant here is closed and 450 guys were out of a job. Sound familiar?

    As a HVAC tech I worked in a couple of houses that were owned by officers of the company. (actually knew them personally, as they came fom a different manufacturing plant that also closed.)

    When I opened my tool case, they saw the Craftsman hand tools. (also "lifetime warranty").
    They ask me why I didn't have Snap-on's. Told them they were too expensive.
    (Didn't volunteer to donate a set of theirs, though.)

    You get what you pay for most of the time, but you still need to use your head.
    "Blue Point" was one of the names for the unplated industrial tools they sold.
     
  7. Blu3duk

    Blu3duk Well-Known Member

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    according to my search efforts the BAHCO tools are Swedish design and the headquarters are in Sweden HQ BAHCO I could be wrong, but hese folks also produced the Sandvik line of tools and now produce under the Ergo name as well.....

    As for the high cost of these tools??? who knows, they really do not look like a set i would use, kind of thick although those do have some application, i seem to always be needful of a thin wrench and one with a professional curve in it to get the parts off i want to without pulling everything in front of the nut or bolt.... ergo heating a spendy set of iron up to give it that "just right for this job" might be happening cause replacements would come hard....

    But it doess appear that snapon has the us contract for bahco, but i never could see paying so many dollars for snap-on either.... not when craftsman works well, and has about as good as policy as anyone else to exchange a broken tool and replace it if it fails.... they have even taken back some things friends of mine have tweeked with extra leverage, which is not in the warraty but they exchange it anyway....

    William
     
  8. e.alleg

    e.alleg Well-Known Member

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    I am an ASE master tech and when I worked at the shop full time I used Snap-On, Mac, Matco, and Cornwall. They are all good tools, Snap-On seemed to me to be the best quality for most of their stuff. Now that I work from home I sold all my Snap-On tools and I use Craftsman. When I was working 60 hpours a week I didn't have time to go to Sears and exchange a broken tool or go shopping when I needed something. That is the beauty of the tool truck, they came every week and swapped out what was broken on their time, not mine. After I moved I tried getting a Snap-On tool replaced from the local dealer and he didn't really want to talk to me.
     
  9. fixer1958

    fixer1958 None of the Above

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    They didn't want to talk to you because you didn't have a several hundred or thousand $ truck account going.
    My Snapon dealer told me that they are so high because they replace a wrench or any other tool on the average of 7 times.
    I've tried Sears tools and they just won't hold up, besides like e.alleg said, I don't have time.
    The wrenches are about average priced. A single Snapon or Matco 1/4" socket can go for $12 to $15.
    If for around the house cheap tools are ok, but if you use the same wrench 20 times a day you had better get the good tools.
     
  10. fixer1958

    fixer1958 None of the Above

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    I looked at the picture again and a 1 1/4" wrench can easily go for $75. Sounds like maybe it's a good deal after all.
     
  11. Oilpatch197

    Oilpatch197 Well-Known Member

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    Looks to me those would be "farmer tools" I knew several farmers, they would use them on big bolts and stuff on the combines/tractors, and abused the heck out of them too!
     
  12. sleeps723

    sleeps723 Well-Known Member

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    snapon or mac tools also owns n produces stanley tools
     
  13. wilderness1989

    wilderness1989 Well-Known Member

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    I worked as a professional mechanic at GM dealerships for 20 years and only had one defective tool replaced by Snap-On or Mac in that time and I did my share of the heavy work, engines, transmissions and such.
     
  14. michiganfarmer

    michiganfarmer Max Supporter

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    I buy lots of snap on, but I dont buy their wrenches because they are thin. Well, that, and they are $400 bucks for a set from 1/4'-1 1/4". They cut into my hands when Im trying to loosen a very tight fastener.
     
  15. sleeps723

    sleeps723 Well-Known Member

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    i hate the thin wrenches also, i like the old fat boy craftsman wrenches but they quit making them. wishd i had bought more sets now.
     
  16. Auric

    Auric Registered Doofus

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    Maybe the "other" brand is the ones that are sold exclusively to the US Government? So $230 bucks for the WHOLE SET, seems cheap, comparatively!
     
  17. e.alleg

    e.alleg Well-Known Member

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    Snap-On sockets don't crack as easily as Craftsman when used with an air ratchet but they do get worn. The Snapon Flank Drive Plus (TM) wrenches are great. $50+ each but the open ends grab like a flare-nut wrench. On the truck you have to watch out, Snap-On sells some bargain-basement tools as Blue-Point or whatever they don't hold up as good. You get what you pay for I guess. What you need to know is that your Snap-On dealer marks the tools up at least 100% from what he pays, that spreads out the cost of selling $3000 worth of tools to a guy that pays $50 a week. They don't charge interest and they don't charge you gas money to deliver that new toolbox but everyone pays. I bought most of my tools outright, my dealer gave me a 30-40% discount if I did cash and carry (and he still made good money) if you can swing it ask your dealer for a payment in full discount. I love Snap-On tools, don't get me wrong, but I had $65k worth of tools and I couldn't get a $30 socket replaced without a sob story. I even showed the guy my book and he was still saying "well that's great for your old dealer but you haven't bought anything from me... yada yada" and he wanted me to send my broken tools via UPS to get them replaced. No thanks I see how it is.
     
  18. mwhit

    mwhit Well-Known Member

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    DH only uses Matco and Snap-on-- he breaks Craftsman like they are made of cheap plastic (geez, I can break Craftsman and I'm not a big, burly man-- I'm a 100 pound woman). He also feels that although Craftsman will replace a broken tool it is a pain to drive 60 miles to the closest Sears to get a replacement socket. He used to only buy Snap-On, but where he works now (for the past 6 years) his boss owns a Matco route so he gets a deal (at his bosses cost) and he's really been stocking up.

    The garage I used to work at deals with Snap-On and honestly, I saw alot of the guys being given a hard time to replace things-- similar to the above where the tool guy didn't have one on the truck so they needed to send it via UPS etc. Kinda defeats the purpose of a fast, convenient replacement when you need to wait for weeks for a new socket...
     
  19. foxtrapper

    foxtrapper Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I always thought it was interesting how the snap-on mechanics would always insist their tools never broke. Yet whenever the truck showed up, there they were in a line getting replacements.

    I've certainly broken plenty of Craftsman tools myself. But I've also broken a whole bunch of Snap-On as well.

    Snap-On doesn't warranty wearing out their tools. This sure mattered when I was spinning wrenches in jets, because we'd wear sockets out quickly. And since that's not covered, you'd have to buy new sockets. We'd grenade Snap-On ratches at the rate of about 2 a week.

    Personally, I've never found skinny slippery wrenches to be a good thing to work with. They hurt my hand to pull on, and when I slip because my greasy paws can't grip the smooth chrome surface, blood and cussing results. I tend to like a thick shank and a nobbly surface that I can get a grip on. But lest you think I'm defending all things Craftsman, let me say I can't stand a screwdriver that snaps its tip off when I sneeze.

    And then there was the mechanic I worked with who had old Matco tools. He never said anything, and I don't think he ever broke anything either. He'd just work with a minimum of blood, and didn't buy new tools. He also had the most interesting tool box I ever saw. Wide, with a million very shallow drawers.
     
  20. fixer1958

    fixer1958 None of the Above

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    Snap-On does warranty worn out tools and they do break. Whoever says any of the tool truck tools don't break is lying. I break/wear them out all the time.
    You can get the "industrial wrench or socket" which is a flat finish like an impact socket. The problem with that is you can't see them underhood and will lose alot versus chrome that reflects. Drop an impact socket into the abyss of a greasy ford and it will be there till the day it goes to the scraper.
    All my screwdrivers are neon colors. They all have there spot in the "box" so I know everything is accounted for. Like I said before, a $15 hit for a 1/4 socket can take a toll if you use it 10 times a day. I have 2 of some tools.
    I have to say that Sears screwdrivers are about the best and a whole lot cheaper. 50 mile trip to Sears is not worth it to me.

    Any tools I find under the hood I consider fair game. I've been the knucklehead to leave them there and I have also been the one to retrieve them and they are mine now. I have never gotten any back that I have left, so what goes around.............. Some nice ones and some junk.
    And I emphasize "under the hood".