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Do does need to be separated from the rest of the herd when they are about due to deliver? My small group all run together (4 total, including buck) along with 4 geese. She is due within the next 2 weeks and tried to separate her from the group into another pen, but she got out and went back in with the others. This is her 2nd attempt at delivery. She lost her last twins(both born live) which I suspect was due to her being with the rest of the menagerie. I wanted to separate her this time, but she seems too attached to the rest. She ran through an electric fence. I think the real culprits last time were the geese and will at least try to separate them, but didn't know if she really needed to be by her self.
 

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I Have Had Moms Delive Just Fine In With The Others Then I Have Had Moms Who Deliver In With The Others And Just Leave The Kid Because Everyone Else Is Trying To Help, Or I Have Had Newborns Get Stepped On And Hurt Or Killed While They Are Still Weak
I Try To Seperate The Moms So They Get To Bond With There New Baby And So The Kid Gets To Nursing On Mom Good
 

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One Doe I Did Have This Spring Screamed When I Seperated Her From Her Sister, So I Did Pen Off Sister In With Her And All Went Well Mom Didnt Panic Being Seperated Then And They Have Both Raised The Kid (sister Didnt Get Breed This Year And The One That Did Was An Acident)
 

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I didn't separate mine until they were in labor, but then again I knew the exact due dates. My buck is a Nigerian Dwarf and the girls standard LaManchas, so I hand bred them.

The doe will want to be alone during her labor instinctually, and may hide if she's running with a herd. So if you can tell that she's very close (no ligaments, that round eyed look, yawning and pawing at the ground) she'll separate easily. Then I kept my does sequestered away with their newborns for a day or two till the babies walk and nurse better.

I haven't lost any kids by letting the mama run with the herd, and I have seven adult does. Are they in a small pen where babies could get stepped on? I know geese can be aggressive, but it's not likely they'd be able to kill a goat kid. My girls went nuts if another doe came near her babies. They are timid around my dogs, but with babies the does chased the dogs all over the place. I'd wonder if something else didn't cause the babies to die, birth defects, infections, not nursing, etc.
 

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We just leave a stall open in the barn. All 3 of ours that kidded this year separated themselves when they were ready - like 10 minutes before. The other goats went to graze and they stayed behind and had kids. I'd have separate space available - a barn stall if you have it or a freestanding pen -she'll likely let you know if she wants it. You can move her when labor starts (if you're there) - I don't see the need to separate earlier than that.
 

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I have a large old barn that has a large run in stall that I normally allow all goats access to 24/7. When one is in the early stages of labor (Ligaments lost) I close off the expecting doe in the run in stall and keep a very close eye on her. I'm there for all deliveries. An hour after kidding if the kids are all doing fine, I open the door and allow for full access again. I have a couple temporary shelters available to the goats that are blocked out during labor if the weather turns bad.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you all for the quick advise. The goat family is a Boer Doe, Boer buck and 2 pygmy wethers, plus the 4 geese. We were caught off guard last time, I wasn't home and it was January. So the cold may have had as much to do with it as any (Northern IN). Anyway, I'm trying to be better prepared this time. I didn't think it would be this tough to separate, but sounds like I really don't have to, at least until around actual birthing time. Thanks again.
 

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If your herd is fairly small (10-20 adult does or less) and you have adequate barn space, I don't recommend seperating her unless she's at the bottom of the pecking order. I do attempt to seperate disadvantaged animals. The thing is, it really stresses them out. They hate being seperated. I have had kids trampled to death when they had floppy kid syndrome and were too weak to get out of the way of the bigger goats, but here the solution isn't seperation, it's keeping right on top of watching for FKS and treating them for it pronto.

Other than FKS and cocci, worms, I can't really recall losing any kids. Is your barn big enough for them all, and the kids have stuff to hide under while the moms are grazing? Do you cull the violent, super aggressive animals?
 

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If you have space in their shed/barn you can use a cut up hog panle to make a small kidding/bonding pen. This allows the dam access to the other goats while also allowing her some privacy and some security for the kids. She can see/hear/smell and interact with the other goats.
I have our up close and just kidded does in one barn. I throw up hog panel pieces into make shift kidding pens a few days before a doe is due and keep it heavily bedded. The expectant does go into the pens if I think they are close and I may not be there, but are left to run the rest of the time to make sure they are receiving adequate exercise for easier birthing.
Years ago, the does were left to kid in the group. We had a decent sized area and most kidded in the shed but some chose the hay pile. Misty dropped her triplets all around the pen one January.
Be sure to be around and to make sure the kids nurse. If the kids are up and nursing and the dam isn't too stressed they should be fine. Espeically since it is only the one doe in your group.
 

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We have a small herd, too. Our doe is due in a week. We were going to separate her this weekend. We've had her the longest of our goats (along with her half sister). The other does we've only had a couple of months. So we were wondering if we might put her and her buddy in the birthing stall--instead of just her alone.

If we miss the kidding will she and the kids be o.k. with one other doe in with them? I don't want to stress her out by separating her from the herd......but I don't trust our newer herdmates with a new kid, either.

And....this is our first birth so I don't trust myself enough to know the right time...even though we're keeping a pretty close watch.

Dee
 
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