~exciting news~

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by suburbanite, Sep 11, 2006.

  1. suburbanite

    suburbanite Well-Known Member

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    Okay, exciting for *me* anyway!

    My black krim tomatoes are finally starting to turn orangy-brown!

    :hobbyhors

    Tomato success is imminent.....:D

    (I've never grown tomatoes before, so this is a Big Deal.)

    Any other garden successes to share out there that nobody but another gardener would appreciate? I'd like this thread to be a place to post about the little successes--even something really simple, like growing that one perfect carrot, or finding an untouched ear of corn in a field full of borers.
     
  2. turtlehead

    turtlehead Well-Known Member

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    That *is* a Big Deal! Seems like it takes forever for that first change of color in tomatoes.

    I grew peas this year! I'd tried them when I lived in zone 8 and they always burned up before setting fruit. Peas love it here where there's a nice decent drawn-out spring (at least there was this year).

    I also grew broccoli and it was AMAZING. Lost most of it to soft rot but the first couple of heads were just indescribable. I couldn't grow that in zone 8 either. Next year I'll get it all out real early so I can harvest it before the worms and rot get to it. It was heaven on a fork.
     

  3. suburbanite

    suburbanite Well-Known Member

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    Oh, when I had broccoli up last december--wow, talk about broccoli orgasm! I can't even look at it in a supermarket now.
     
  4. marcir

    marcir Well-Known Member

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    Only one plant survived out of a whole row of red amaranth and it was specTACKular: about 9 feet high with drooping burgundy dreadlocks everywhere. Sadly, it self-decapitated but I caught lots of seed and will try again next year. Lucky for me there's always a next year!
    Marci in Nor Cal
     
  5. suburbanite

    suburbanite Well-Known Member

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    Marcir--what variety of amaranth was it? I live in your general region so I should probably try the same type next year.

    Only one of my 4 leaf-amaranths ("summer spinach") grew this year. It must have been a bad year for amaranth.
     
  6. suburbanite

    suburbanite Well-Known Member

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    I have just learned how to tell if tomatoes are ripe--

    Wait until the squirrels eat them!

    Both my ripest tomatoes were sampled by brush-tailed rats today.

    Grrrrrrr!

    I only saw squirrels in my yard twice this year prior to this theft~~

    As someone who doesn't generally like tomatoes as fruit, I have decided Black Krim aren't bad.

    This is the first time I've had a tomato that didn't taste like it was watered-down. The flavor of these was more like 'sundried' tomatoes than what I've had on burgers and in salads before.
     
  7. marcir

    marcir Well-Known Member

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    Hi Suburbanite,
    Sorry but I can't find my seed invoices from last year to tell you about the red amaranth variety. I do remember it was an edible type, seeds and leaves. I bought it from Pinetree Seeds - apparantly they are not offering it this year as it isn't in their catalog. If I run across it I will be sure to send it to you.
    Congratulations on your tomatoes, maybe throwing a net over the remaining fruits would discourage those squirrels!
    Marci in Nor Cal