Evil sticker vine-bush??

Discussion in 'Plant and Tree Identification' started by Kstornado11, Jan 3, 2007.

  1. Kstornado11

    Kstornado11 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    There are these bush-vine type sticker things ALL OVER the fields & woods here... I think they are a bush of some sort, but the limbs are long & thin & covered w/ tiny thorns... we are in eastern Kansas. Anyone have any clue what these might be, or where to go to look them up? They grow all over the fields, and are super-thick in the woods... it's maddening to try to walk thru the woods without getting tangled & snared by the evil things!! :flame:
     
  2. davaseco

    davaseco HERE chickie-chick-chick

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  3. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    what color are they? any pics? sounds like blackberry briars to me... they get ahold and won't let go without a fight.
     
  4. Kstornado11

    Kstornado11 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well I think you are right! I googled them and that is what they look like. The landlady told me that when she was a kid, they would go up into the field & pick blackberries, and I remember seeing a berry up there last summer & wondering if it was edible! Is it possible they spead ALLL over the feilds & into the surrounding woods?
     
  5. marvella

    marvella Well-Known Member

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    yes, it's quite possible. some see them as invasive. to me it looks as if they are part of the cycle where land that has been abused renews itself. as trees come back they eventually shade out the berries.

    when they bllom in the spring we take it as the last cold snap in this area. they should be ready to pick by july 4. be sure and take precautions against chiggers. i get them everytime i pick. :)
     
  6. Tricky Grama

    Tricky Grama Well-Known Member

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    You are lucky if it's blackberries...at first I thought you were describing the dreaded GREEN BRIAR!! I'll curse that til my dying day...

    Patty
     
  7. jen74145

    jen74145 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Ooh, blackberries... and lots of 'em!
    Hmm... I see jams, pies, frozen, dried, and fresh berries in your future... yum.
    If you go out picking, wear long pants and sleeves, maybe with elastic bands to keep the buggies out...
     
  8. MeanDean

    MeanDean that geeky admin guy

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    I'm assuming we're talking the dreaded "round leaf green briar" here?
    [​IMG]
    Do you have any remedies for greenbriar control or even better, eradication?
    _
     
  9. Tricky Grama

    Tricky Grama Well-Known Member

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    We have that 'round leaf green briar' too but the kind w/thorns & thicker vines is the real Satan IMO. We have 20 ac, 10 is wooded & was all full of green briar, poison ivy, Virginia creeper, honeysuckle, wild grapevine, & maybe some other stuff. Where we can mow, it's beginning to be tamed. Where we can only clip it w/'lopers' it comes back double but we keep on tryin'.

    We've mowed & sprayed 10% vinegar & this has helped the most. But can't get to most of it. The vines are in all the trees, or were, & some of the poison ivy vines are bigger than my upper arm. I thought they were small trees entwined in the bigger trees at first.

    This is what we do every weekend-pull vines out of trees.

    Patty
     
  10. MeanDean

    MeanDean that geeky admin guy

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    On my last property, we had a very thick poison ivy vine running up a tree.

    I waited until the dead of winter, snow in fact, before I crossed the creek - obviously covered in clothing head-to-toe - and carefully soas not to cause flying sawdust, cut the vine with a back-saw/mitre saw in two places about 4 inches part.

    I then made sure to remove my gloves with a towel soas not to get any cuttings onto my person. Put on rubber gloves and took off the rest of my stuff in a shower-stall to - brushing off (and not shaking out) any dust fragments.

    Yeah, alot of over-kill on the clean-up, but that process killed the vine dead without killing me with an incurable itch.
     
  11. bee

    bee WV , hilltop dweller Supporter

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    green briar "control".. eat them. Get a wild foods book to tell you what parts in what season and get the best "revenge" going!! according to Petersons the young shoots " are excellent cooked like asparagus and served with butter"....
     
  12. Wildcrofthollow

    Wildcrofthollow Well-Known Member

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    I'm with Bee,

    eat them, cut them back now and when they try to re-sprout it the spring just keep cutting and eating them, you may not kill them for quite a while but you will enjoy doing it. I usually eat the shoots raw on salads.
     
  13. Tricky Grama

    Tricky Grama Well-Known Member

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    I can't imagine eating them-I'm full of deep scratches from moving piles of it to the burn pile as well as pulling it out of trees. How do you get rid of the huge thorns?

    Patty
     
  14. Wildcrofthollow

    Wildcrofthollow Well-Known Member

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    you can't eat them once they get old and stickery. just the young shoots. so cut them off and let them resprout. You can also grind up the roots to make a gelatin (im told) and had somone once tell me you could use the old stems if you cooked them a long time and split them up well. Well i've tried digging them up (to get them out of a garden bed... good luck there) and i cannot imagine that the old stems would ever get soft enough to eat no matter how long you cooked them but in fairness, i havent tried it so should shut up about it. Different greenbriers will taste different depending on quite a lot of factors. Some are great raw and others are a bit strong for me. cooking may alleviate some of that problem but i havent tried that.