Evap Silinoid?

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by MOJILL, Sep 26, 2004.

  1. MOJILL

    MOJILL Well-Known Member

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    Okay first I'm probably spelling that wrong.

    But - the Check Engine light came on and the guy at the shop said my Evap Silinoid around the gas tank isn't working properly. He said it would be over $200 (part/labor) but then the added that it's not urgent - that I can drive around with it just as it is.

    I was so glad to get my car out of there (needed it inspected) I didn't think to ask him A) will it do long term damage if I don't do anything?? B) if it's not important - why would it cost so much? C) etc.....

    It's a toyota corolla (2002).

    Any thoughts????

    Thanks - - Jill (mechanically challanged)
     
  2. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    OK I'm a bit mechanically challenged with the new stuff too but what the heck is an evap solinoid and what does it do for a gas tank? The last check engine light prob I had was an O2 sensor in the exhaust manifold and since my van is farm plated it doesn't need to pass the emmisions test. A modern horse and buggy exemption? Don't tempt me cause I am very tempted to buy a good driving horse and a buckboard wagon to do my "to town" trips in. That or a motor cycle and side car!
     

  3. John Hill

    John Hill Grand Master

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    I would hazard this is something called the "evaporation solenoid"? My best guess is that this opens or closes some valve, maybe an air inlet, to inhibit or control evaporation of fuel from the tank. It might not do anything more than close off the air inlet when the engine is stopped, just like that little screw on the gas cap of your lawn mower.

    This sounds like an electro mechanical device, rather than some inscrutable blob of plastic 'electronic' component. If you can get to it you might save a few dollars by cleaning and checking all electrical connections to the fuel tank plus cleaning anything that looks like it would like to be cleaned. Also check and secure any hoses and hose fittings etc.

    If I am right in my assumptions this will not cause any harm to your engine and the amount of gasoline lost to evaporation will not be much either however while you have this fault bringing up the check engine light you run the risk of it masking a really serious condition that might arise and require immediate attention.
     
  4. MOJILL

    MOJILL Well-Known Member

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    The first time the check engine light came on the mechanic said the gas tank cover was not sealed properly. He tightened it and then then disenganged the light.

    Now he's saying it's because of the evap solinoid (John your discription of it sounds correct).

    Another person said that since the car just hit the 50k mile marker it's probably a default light that comes on so I'll take it back to the toyota dealer for a thorough check (and lots of $$).

    I'll check and clean it like you suggest John before deciding what to do next.

    Thanks guys for your input.

    Jill
     
  5. DrippingSprings

    DrippingSprings In Remembrance

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    I was a store manager in auto parts for many years. Sounds to me like someone is trying to make a quick buck off of you. There are a ton of different things that will make the check engine light come on. Nine times out of ten it is something really cheap. Most often a set of spark plugs will cure it. Always start cheap and work up. If it has never had plugs in its fifty thousand miles I would start there as they are needed anyway. If it cures the light then you saved a good chunk of money. If not well you needed them anyway. I would suggest you take it to someone you know you can trust. they will unplug the battery and let the system clear itself and then use a code reader after driving it a short distance and see what trouble codes you will get then. Sometimes it will disappear all along. I have owned several Crown Victorias and as long as I use the higher grade fuels I am fine as soon as you run a couple tanks of 87 in it the light comes on. Just a characteristic of this vehicle. I have a 2000 dollar scanner made by snap on and I would get no code at all in the parking lot. take it to a shop and I suddenly had a "major problem" that was gonna cost several hundred to fix it. My solution was taking the egr valve off and knocking the carbon out of it and I was good for another twenty thousand or so miles. I always get tickled at these "mechanics" that say "well the lights on but it doesnt matter you can drive it and never worry about it. I will even disconnect the wire to the light for you" This usually means they cant find the real problem and are glad to get what they have already gotten out of you for not fixing it and you leave feeling he has actually done something for you. You cant take newer vehicles to just anyone anymore. My father has a large shop out in Texas. he spends tons of money each year just to be able to keep current diagnostic tools required on newer vehicels up to date. Gomer with a pipe wrench and duct tape just dont cut it anymore. You want to lose all the headaches go back to when cars were user friendly and buy something that wont cost a ton to fix. I have several old vehicles. I had a 67 Dodge Polara 383 stroker motor AC PS etc that passed emissions in Texas and my mothers Lincoln with 30,000 miles on it didnt. If mine quits all I need to know is if I am getting fuel and fire.
     
  6. DrippingSprings

    DrippingSprings In Remembrance

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    by the way like most vehicles now. your car has a evap sol relay under the hood that controls the solenoid itself. it costs about eight bucks. go to the dealer or local parts store that has a locator in their system it will tell you exactly where to find it and anyone with a digital voltmeter can test it. sometimes you can just unplug a relay and replug it and it will work fine. also see where the evap sol os on that vehicle as it may be tested with a digital volt meter as well really cheap while it is still on the vehicle
     
  7. MOJILL

    MOJILL Well-Known Member

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    WOW drippingsprings.... thank you.! Good info.

    Jill
     
  8. mikell

    mikell Well-Known Member

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    Like all vehicles since 98 if you gas cap is loose or bad it will trigger a fault. The OBD2 system does a system check every time you start your vehicle and as your driving down the road. Some of the valves are under the hood and some are at the fuel sending unit at the tank I don't know with your vehicle. Wallmart has an excellent system that fits all vehicles for 100$ I bought one and has paid for itself just by loaning it out at 10$ a crack.


    mikell
     
  9. DrippingSprings

    DrippingSprings In Remembrance

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    good post mikell. I have a 99 crown vic and a 92 one as well. the check engine light came on in the 99. i ran the code and it detected an open circuit. turned out to be my son notice the tail light bulb was blown took it out to go get another one and i drove the car down to the grocery store and it detected an open circuit lol alot of the newer vehicels require either a vented or non vented gas cap, and if yours issnt the right one or isnt operating correctily it will definately cause problems.
     
  10. herefordman

    herefordman Well-Known Member

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    Evaporative Solenoid valve is a valve that opens and closes to allow controlled engine vacuum to suck excess fuel vapors from the fuel tank into the running engine so that it doesn't just vent to atmosphere and pollute the air.
    That is why a good sealing gas cap is necessary in order for the differential pressure to be sensed to trigger the solenoid relay.
    do yourself a big favour, get an ordinary manual (Haynes etc.) from any parts store for your car. Once you know what stuff looks like and where it is, its easy to just unplug it and put one on yourself.The light may not go out right away, they are programmed to usually reset after a certain amount of starts, the manual will explain that reset process.
    Even junkyard cars still have good Emission control parts on them, shop around.
    Older carburretted cars can run no problem without most of the pollution crap on them removed, but newer fuel injected cars will suffer badly and yes you can damage engines by messing with fuel injected engines when you don't know what your doing.