Ethnic cuisine raising the value of goats

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by primroselane, May 15, 2005.

  1. primroselane

    primroselane Well-Known Member

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    and sheep as well.

    http://abcnews.go.com/Business/WNT/story?id=708036

    Between 1997 and 2002, 15,000 new goat farms were started in the United States, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The number of goats raised for meat jumped 58 percent.

    Fueling the demand is the nation's burgeoning ethnic population. Immigrants from Asia, the Middle East and Latin America grew up eating goat, one of the few meats that isn't taboo in any religion.
     
  2. papaw

    papaw Well-Known Member

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    Very interesting ... thanks for posting it.
     

  3. Laura

    Laura Well-Known Member

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    I was talking with my feed guy, who was talking with the head of the Mexican community. If I were to raise enough goats, I would be guaranteed sales of 120 goats per holiday at $2 a pound live weight. There is no way I can meet that demand on my small place, even if I could aquire that many goats.

    I have families from as far away as 120 miles pulling into my driveway asking for chevo grande. I have no idea how they find me. My customer base is Mexican, Philipino and Vietnamese.

    Instead, I'll do turkeys. Free range, wheat fed turkeys will sell for $1.69 a pound live weight. I like my non English speaking customers, they prefer to butcher animals themselves and saves me the mess and trouble.
     
  4. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I saw it on the news last week....they were in Western PA for the story I think. I'd like to cross my herd (nubian) with a meat breed but havent done it yet! Plus I havent had people stopping by .... if I did I'd make the investment!
    Its hopeful news though!
     
  5. Ken in Maine

    Ken in Maine Well-Known Member

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    Even here in Maine there is a big demand for goat meat. Melissa buy yourself a nice boer buckling.. breed him to your does and put a sign at the end of your driveway. Trust me you will be able to sell all you have. Last year UMaine Ext. did a goat tour and we sold out 30 pounds in a few minutes. I believe that I could sell a couple hundred pounds of goat meat a month and that's here in Central Maine.

    My cardiologist found out I raise goats ( his last name is Hassan) and he told me he would buy as well as all his friends. I haven't been selling any at all because I couldn't keep up with the demand.

    Try it we need folks raising even just a few goats to form a cooperative.
     
  6. oz in SC

    oz in SC Well-Known Member

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    This is something I have been contemplating doing when we relocate...

    There are Hispanics up in the area and it would be a nice additional income.
     
  7. kppop

    kppop Well-Known Member

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    Don't forget the ppl from the West Indies. We eat quite a bit of goat and prefer it to beef. It used to be really hard to find and now it's become more main stream.
     
  8. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    Here couple years ago I got couple Sheep for some Mexicans for a big get together.Well they butcherd one of them Sheep,cooked it up,it was good,got to drinking with them,they wanted me to stay the night but my Spanish isn't that good,worse when I've been drinking :confused: .Thought it best I thank them and slip on out of there,find a room in town. :D

    Them buyers up at the Sale Barn like to buy 600 head at a time.

    big rockpile
     
  9. Bluecreekrog

    Bluecreekrog Well-Known Member

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    I went to an Indian (asian) resturant that advertised a goat dish, when I mentioned I had never eaten goat and wanted to try it cause I was thinking of raising them, I was informed that they would take as many as I could raise, Alive
     
  10. kppop

    kppop Well-Known Member

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    We prefer to buy the live goat and kill it and clean it ourselves. That way we can save what we want and dipose of the rest. My sil makes goat's head soup..do you know how hard it is to find just the goat's head?? :) lol Also they eat the nads of the goats and it's hard to find goat nads in the fresh meat aisle.

    By buying them fresh you have a better idea of how healthy the goat is and by seeing it in where it was raised will also give you a better idea of how tender or gamey the meat will be. We usually buy our goats from Amish friends or at the 4H livestock sales. (you pay more at the sales but it goes to a good cause..the kids)
     
  11. Gary in ohio

    Gary in ohio Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Our local meet processing center is now accepting goats. A number of folks in the area are raising goats for the increasing large hispanic and muslim population in Columbus.
     
  12. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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    We're pretty much all white around here. I've heard goat meat is good? I've never had it. I recently found out that goat milk is excellent.
     
  13. dalilies

    dalilies Well-Known Member

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    I know that pig is taboo for Jews and Muslims. Are goats raised on the same farm as pigs off limits too? I've thought about raising goats and sheep but I also raise a pig for our family and didn't know if my pig would make the goats unkosher. If so, I wonder how long I would have to be pig free to be able to raise goats?

    Hmmm, where is that rule book.
    Jennifer
     
  14. Sharon in NY

    Sharon in NY Well-Known Member

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    I love goat meat. In college, the hallal butcher in the Indian neighborhood used to sell it, and since I would eat hallal as well as kosher and it was dead cheap, goat curry was one of my staple dishes. It is very lean, can be dry if you don't baste it carefully and use some fat in cooking, and very tasty.

    Jennifer, while Jewish farmers can't raise pigs (kind of a pity, since I'd like to pen a couple up and get them to "pig" my new garden area for me), meat is kosher because of its health and the method of slaughter, not because of how it is raised. Your pig shouldn't be a problem, as long as they are kept seperately - at least for Jews.

    Young kid is a particularly traditional dish for many Jews and moslems at Passover and the end of Ramadan. If you can manage early kidding, you will probably do very, very well.

    Sharon
     
  15. dalilies

    dalilies Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Sharon,

    I thought it mainly had to do with the method of slaughter. Just thought it would be wise to double check early in the game. Hubby raised goats as a kid. Looks like I need to start thinking about building a goat shack.

    Jennifer
     
  16. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    If you like lamb, you'll probably like goat. I cook it long and slow with a little liquid (tomato sauce). I cut slits all over the roast and insert little sprigs of rosemary and slivers of garlic and lemon. If I have little cubes of meat I'll marinate them in balsamic vinegar, cinnamon, and soy sauce and cook them on skewers.

    Another way I really like to do the roasts is cover them with sliced onions. Then make a sauce with wine vinegar, cinnamon, red wine, garlic, cumin, oregano, and a couple of hot chilis whirled together in a blender. Cover the meat and onions with the sauce and put it in a slow oven.

    Boy, my mouth is watering. I've got a yearling wether who probably isn't too tough...