Ethnic Calendar - for traditional holiday feast of goat meat

Discussion in 'Goats' started by bumpus, Jul 10, 2005.

  1. bumpus

    bumpus Well-Known Member

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    .
    Be very careful of having your kid goats born to early
    in the cold part of winter, because most kid goats
    won't make it through the cold and snow !



    Some info I found which may help

    also go to top of the page for other info.



    http://www.ansci.cornell.edu/extension/meatgoat3.html#cal
     
  2. bumpus

    bumpus Well-Known Member

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    one time bump up
     

  3. mpillow

    mpillow Well-Known Member Supporter

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  4. bumpus

    bumpus Well-Known Member

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  5. bumpus

    bumpus Well-Known Member

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  6. goatmarm

    goatmarm Well-Known Member

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    Thanks bumpus,
    Excellent webpage with lots of helpfull info.. The pictures for comparison of what to look for in a good meat kid are great.
     
  7. Mortgage-Hill

    Mortgage-Hill Active Member

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    well for one i don't agree with what was said,,,--------The white kid is a cull that has been left on her dam while the Cou Blanc kid is being reared artificially as a dairy replacement. Both kids are very healthy looking. However, the little Cou Blanc, like many of her contemporaries, is being raised on limited amounts of milk supplemented with a high protein pelleted feed and a highly palatable hay. Although she is very beautiful and healthy, she has very little meat on her and is not a prime Easter or 4-H market kid. Part of this is because of the conformation she was born with and part of this is because of the way she is being raised.



    As you can see, she is shorter in both height and length than the white kid. This means she will have less forearm, thigh or loin area to build muscle and hence, meat on. See how her belly has a wedge shape to it when viewed from the top. An animal with a well developed rumen generally has a poorer dressing percentage than a more immature animal that is not consuming much roughage (hay, grass, etc) yet.



    If you were to run your hands along her topline, barrel, hips and thighs, you would find that her bone is closer to the surface when compared to the white kid. She would provide little actual meat for a consumer and her absence of fat would lead to rapid carcass dehydration and shrinkage. Although it is often difficult for dairy producers to comprehend, this beautiful animal is not a prime Easter kid. The feeding practices commonly used to produce a dairy replacement kid are rarely suitable for Easter kids.


    i find this so funny,, the "white cull" kid is a saanen type while the other is an alpine type,, Come on people,,, that is like comparing apples to oranges,,,,, or comparing a jersey with a holstein, and why is it that you can 't see if they are both does, or one of each, and that you have to take the author's word for it. and do we know if they are grades or purebreds? do we know the ages, are they born on the same day,, and doesn't the author know the difference between a Dairy goats and a Meat goat?? LOL -and when comparing boers, has one of each sex,, LOL everyone knows bucks and does grow at different rates,, come on if they grew the same then there wouldn't be a need for wethers,,,, i needed a good laugh today!!!! Thanks!!! i guess it is hard for meat producers to understand the concept of a Dairy Goat, guess they might want to think about that when they come a calling for MILK!!!!
    LaNetta Batts
     
  8. goatmarm

    goatmarm Well-Known Member

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    Lanette, I think you missed the whole point of the webpage. It doesn't matter the exact sex, age, etc...Of course it would make sense to illustrate with two kids of the same breed, age+sex, but the comparison is done to show why you will get more at the market for one animal over the other. Whether the are purebred, grade, is moot. They are comparing the flesh(meat) on the bodies. A bottle fed dairy goat often makes a lousy "meat" goat. I would interpret from the page that if you want a good carcass yield from dairy culls, leave them on their dams. Kids, meat or dairy, develop differently depending not only on genetics, but on the methods of rearing. True.
    Say you have twin kids from a very "dairy" dam. Pull one to raise artificially, and let the other remain on the dam. There is no question in my mind which kid will most likely make a more robust market animal. The dam raised kid, no doubt. Just as the page stated, by limiting the milk, kids on bottles tend to develop "hay bellies", and a boney frame. That is great if you are keeping all the offspring for dairy replacements, but if any will be going to market don't be surprised when you get very little for them.
     
  9. Mortgage-Hill

    Mortgage-Hill Active Member

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    i understand your point, but grade and purebred is a factor too, since grades are "F1"s which grow at a faster rate. see i don't have any problems selling my extra buck kids for meat and bring great prices for them, and i don't know hardly anyone that limits thier kids to a certain amount of milk, i feed mine all they can eat several times a day. and i have friends that feed cold milk all day long and night to thier kids. i get that the page is suppose to be helpful,, but i think that they need to factor in more variables than what they have. and you can tell me that whether your kids are dam raised or bottle fed, that you buck kids and doe kids grown at the same rate? and that your jan kids and may kids are always the same size?? i didn't miss the point just think that if they are comparing they need to be accurate when comparing animals.
     
  10. goatmarm

    goatmarm Well-Known Member

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    To a buyer who is looking to butcher for meat it makes no difference whether they are looking at a purebred saanen, or a saanen/boer mix. They will choose and pay more for the animal that appears to be fleshed out better and in good health. It all boils down to whether or not the goats are raised to be of a more "dairy" conformation, or beefy. Beefiness for dairy goats in the show ring is undesirable, but good for meat market animals. If it makes things easier, use your imagination and pretend that the goats compared are all the same breed + sex, and the side by side pics show same age kids. If you try doing that you can see what the author seems to be trying to illustrate. Don't look at the breed, look past that, and just consider the meatiness+ general health of the animals.
     
  11. Mortgage-Hill

    Mortgage-Hill Active Member

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    thanks for your imput, and the way that he illustrates it, yes it does matter which breed ,, since the author is talking about dam raising verses bottle raising. not whether they have dairy character or not. no true dairy goat breeder is expecting to pack the pounds on their market kids, like the meat goats,, but anyone that has been in goats and had several breeds can tell you that each one grows at different rates. if breed didn't matter then why not have 2 alpine type kids.