Erysyphillis

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by vtfarma, Sep 16, 2004.

  1. vtfarma

    vtfarma Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    VT
    With all the problems we have had with this sow and her delivery from **** we would like to pass on information to the rest of the pigging world ... just in case you are new to it or have not had this problem yet. We have a 24 x 12 "barn". One side is for pigs, one for turkeys with a middle section for layers that is insulated and bright. We have, in this barn, only bought our piglets and raised them from 8 weeks or so to butcher. They were the occupants of one section that is occupied by the meat birds in the spring/summer. We always bleach and pressure wash in between. The Turkey part of the building is separated by 8 feet or so.

    We know that turkeys and pigs do not mix. We did not know how devastating it could be to a pig if the flies cross that, or our feet or a stray turkey wanders etc. Our sow has a history of easy births, large litters and not losing any. She had 9 piglets this time (7 in 2 hours and 1 about 1-1/2 hours later who was limp but we brought back though it died in the morning) and 1 piglet born dead we think 14 + hours later. The sow had had a problem with raised welts with a rectangular shape and a small square blistered spot that was black and almost looked like she had been branded. The welts progressed and she went off food and water. We treated her with penicillin for 5 days and she was feisty after 1. That was 2 weeks before the birth.

    We have since lost 3 more (down to 4) piglets. They were not getting enough milk from the Mom to pass her new immunity to them. They basically died of erysyphillis also. No marks - just weak - happened very fast. THe piglets were running fine the night before and were dead by morning - one showed signs of being a bit weak and we were monitoring her closely - she died within hours of noticing the weakness.

    We have since pulled the 4 piglets we have left. They are living in a box in our bedroom. 10 days old and on Milky way milk replacer and karo syrup (the vet says half and half) They are drinking it out of a trough at this point better than the bottle. They are also on a starter grain. We have vaccinated them for erysyphillis and they are on their 3rd day of penicillin. The sow has no milk left and is lonely but the babies are alive.

    This sow is not going to be having any more litters we are selling her for sausage. We should have known more about this. We were agressive on treatment and quick to get it going but still lost a lot. The vet said that it was a good thing we were so diligent and insistent that there was a problem because we would have lost the whole litter and probably the sow also.

    What an education. Anyone else have this problem? What have you done? What about feeding the piglets. What "formula" do you use? Thanks.
     
  2. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Florida
    I'm so sorry for your losses :( This has been a tough farrowing for you and your sow. I've heard of erypiselas but had not attributed it to turkeys and I don't know much about it. Can you post information about the bacteria? My orphan piglets are raised on kid formula and rice cereal but others use other formulas with equal success.
     

  3. vtfarma

    vtfarma Well-Known Member

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    988
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    Location:
    VT
  4. landlord

    landlord Well-Known Member

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    Sep 8, 2004
    Location:
    IA
    This disease, is an airborne. Heat and high humidity can bring it on. Birds can bring it in. A passing semi with sick hogs can transmit it. It struck us a couple of years ago and we lost 80 from 540 feeders. I fought that disease all through out the life of these feeders. Have not had a pig on the place since. The disease causes an extremely high temp and the heart valves blow. It can be sudden death. I had meds in the water went through 10s of thousands of cc's of antibiotics. They were not vaccinated when they came to my place and we did a water vaccination and an injection. The disease would subside and then flare up again. Hit us 4 times in that bunch of pigs. Only good thing about this disease is we found a great way of ridding the pigs with out calling the rendering truck. It is hard to dig holes for pigs weighing 100 - 250.

    The disease started when they were about 100 pounds. The first day there were 25 dead. It was awful, I would give a shot and double dose them, ( never lost an animal with an overdose of pen.) Anyhow the county cleans ditches and chops up the branches and small trees, They dumped 2 loads of mulch at my place. We were trying to burn the dead pigs with lots of trees and not all the pig would burn if you were not there to tend the fire. We had relatives from AZ and the wind was wrong so I covered the unburnt pigs with the mulch. There was just enough heat or spark from the existing fire to slow burn the rest of the pigs. Nothing was left. So for the rest of the summer we had some slow fires going and cooking and incinerating pigs. Had a pitchfork nearby and would flick a ham to the cats or dog. DH dug a whole with the skid and he only had 5 dead pigs before he had to dig another. That is when this ingenius idea came out of no-where to open incinerate them. So when the county is cleaning ditches I make sure I have a mulch pile. I use this around the trees and flowers as well.