EPGs in fecals and treatments

Discussion in 'Goats' started by mzgarden, Aug 12, 2017.

  1. mzgarden

    mzgarden Well-Known Member

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    I'm a little confused about how to consider EPGs in fecals and when/how aggressively to treat. At different times, I have sent fecals to WADDL and other times I've taken them to my vet. It seems no matter the EPG count, my vet always wants me to treat and I'm thinking that's likely too aggressive but looking for some additional inputs.

    Scenarios:
    3 adult Nubians - 1 in milk, none pregnant.
    Routine fecals - no symptoms from anyone.
    Took 3 samples in this week to my vet. Results were Strongyles for all 3 with EPG counts of 40, 100 and 200 respectively. One sample reported Coccidia. Vet wants me to treat with moxidectin for the strongyles and (edit - I suggested Toltrazuril) for the coccidia.

    With counts this low and no other symptoms, I'm more inclined to wait and send samples to WADDL (a whole lot cheaper now that my vet ripped their prices up by more than 2x) to get a 2nd look at the counts and whether they're going up or not.

    Seems to me goats always have some level of parasites. All my previous fecals have shown numbers less than 200 over the years. I'm hesitant to challenge the vet because I want to keep a good relationship however, treating when it's not necessary leads to resistance.

    Goat experts - what do you think?
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2017
  2. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    Those numbers are eggs per gram? What do those numbers mean to the vet? Those are very low eggs per gram. You can't even measure less than 50 eggs per gram with a McMaster slide reliably. Usually >2000 is a problem in mature bucks/does, >1000 in lactating does, and >750 in young stock are indications for deworming. Egg counts are NOT the ONLY indication to deworm due to parasite life cycles! A very heavy burden of immature worms can exist, but are too immature to shed eggs

    Which one was in milk? That plays a role.

    If they are not anemic, good body condition, feces is normal, and the doe producing milk is not showing decreased production - I don't treat, personally.

    WADDL would be expensive to send fecal samples to. Try Mid America Ag Research. They may have increased their price to 6.00 a sample or something. Still cheap.

    Technically not even a vet can recommend Toltrazuril to my knowledge. It's not approved for use in any animals in the US, let alone food producing animals! Especially when other things are approved for food producing animals. I NEVER treat adults for coccidia, just young stock.

    https://www.uaex.edu/publications/pdf/FSA-9608.pdf
     

  3. mzgarden

    mzgarden Well-Known Member

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    @Caprice Acres thank you. To clarify a couple points - the vet ALWAYS wants to treat.
    The girl in milk had an EPG for round worm of 100 and she's the one with the coccid. Her production has actually gone up in the last week, rather than down. She had about 2 days of loose (not scouring) poo a week ago but it went back to berries right away.

    I misspoke about the vet suggesting Toltrazuril. He suggested something else, but I have Toltrazuril so it was me that said to use it. My mistake.

    I'll send new samples to Mid-America and see how they come back. Unless I see some other symptoms, I don't think I'm going to treat.

    Thanks again.