Homesteading Forum banner
1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
318 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So what do you folks know about Emu farming? Now that I am moved here full time I am lookin' for some critters. I met some folks a couple of years ago at the Juneau Co. Fair and got some info. It seems like a growing market in meat and oil and the start up costs are low except for fencing. I met them again this year and am going to go look at their operation sometime next week.

My daughter is all gung-ho on raising pigs for next year's fair. I am thinking about chickens but I get eggs so cheap from the neighbor that it is not worth it, plus I enjoy the visits. I would like a rooster to help wake my teenage daughter up in the morning. Right now it is me hollering and giving Wet Willies so I could use the help.
 

·
Original recipe!
Joined
·
14,044 Posts
They are ugly and a little crazy. I worked with them at several zoos, and I wasn't impressed. Imagine something as dumb as achicken or a guinea and soo much bigger. I would suggest taking the money you would spend on that setup and investing in something else for your farm. A great crop or a better speciality meat.
 

·
Keeping the Dream Alive
Joined
·
1,270 Posts
If farming emus was a good idea, it would probably be a lot more common here in Australia, from where they originate. As it is, a number of people here have gone into ostrich farming. A lot of people have lost a lot of money with both ventures.
I'd recommend you choose something more 'mainstream', but if you really want something more 'exotic', consider alpacas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
318 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Shinsan said:
If farming emus was a good idea, it would probably be a lot more common here in Australia, from where they originate. As it is, a number of people here have gone into ostrich farming. A lot of people have lost a lot of money with both ventures.
I'd recommend you choose something more 'mainstream', but if you really want something more 'exotic', consider alpacas.

Oh I know people who have alpacas and would love for me to join them.

I look at them as glorified pets for rich city folks who want to have something for their hobby farms. I think that you can make money in them until the market crashes and a lot of people will be left holding the bag. It might be worth having a couple but I wouldn't drop all my eggs in that basket. I think alpaca farming is the riskiest venture out there.

I do appreciate the comments.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,700 Posts
DON"T DO IT!!!!
That crase came through her a few years ago.
We had a rescue here.
They are messy. they will eat you out of house and home in the Summer and nearly starve themselves in the winter.
They can take down a strong fence when frightened by loud noise.
They are a bugger to get back home as they lay down if they don't want to go.
People here ended up with large herds and the processing fee was so much they couldn't afford to do it so they just took them out into the woods and either let them go or shot them.

They produce red meat like beef. The only meat on them is the drumsticks.
BIG drumbsticks!
If you like to eat emu then get a pair and raise your own meat but you will have to do your own butchering too. My Son loves the steaks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,321 Posts
At one time, they were all around here, but they are dangerous. All the Emu's are gone now.....they gave them away for free...no one wanted them. I feel you will loose big time if you try to invest in these critters. You could not give me one of them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,504 Posts
I'll echo what everyone else says - this was the next big thing - about 15 years ago.

No meat processing place for them - no one butchers them - the only ones that really made any money were the ones that were first in the craze. Everyone else seemed to lose money on them.

I still see folks trying to sell breeding pairs.. only now they are $150 instead of $2500.

If you want exotic - try raising Highland Cattle. They are extremely hard, can make beef on rough forage other cattle won't touch, look very different, and the beef is premium. And they are gentle.

(Ok, I've never raised any Highland Cattle, but if I had the money I'd sure invest in a them over emus, alpacas, llamas, ostriches etc)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,649 Posts
"I think alpaca farming is the riskiest venture out there."

Emu's were alpacas 12-15 years ago.

As for gentle - just try and grab one to wrestle it. You had better be a better man than I am. They will beat the ---t out of you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,333 Posts
So you want some emus? The easiest way to acquire em is to learn their calls... and start calling. If anyone local has had em in the past, you might be able to call some up.

I've had feral emus sneak up on me, and my nearest neighbors back then were two miles away.

I wouldn't pay more than the slaughter price, if you could find someone wanting the oil... believe there was a slaughterhouse in Texas back in the heyday... the price fell so low, they weren't worth the fuel costs hauling em to the slaughterhouse... so folks just opened their gates, and watched their life savings wander off into the sunset.
 

·
Master Of My Domain
Joined
·
7,220 Posts
i think some of the big money made was to sell the idea of emu farming to other folks.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,448 Posts
The best way to start emu raising is to start with a load of money. Raise emus until you go broke, won't take long.

They were one of the passing fads. Much like the pot belly pig, the llamas, longhorn cattle, buffalo, alpacas. You can still raise them but don't expect to break even.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
600 Posts
Paul,
Forget about emus. BUY MY SHEEP! I have health problems and must unload my two small flocks. I have six commercial grade ewes and an unrelated Texel cross ram that I am trying to place. I also have five registered Shetland ewes and an unrelated ram for sale. I also have three Shetland ewe-lambs I am selling for $100/each; one black, one white and one light grey with spots.

There is money in direct marketing grass-fed lamb. I have more buyers than I can meet in Madison. I am only getting out of the business due to health reasons that I can't over come. I am located in Green County.

Sorry for the sale pitch folks but I just have to get rid of these sheep. I don't want to but will for the sake of my family.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
608 Posts
I have one, he's a really cool pet. He is so dumb he would freeze to death if we didn't go out and bring him in. He will hunker down in a snow/sleet storm and his feathers freeze to the ground. I had another before this one, but he was forever pestering the dog, a German Shepard, and finally one day he lost his head over it. He reached through the fence and bit that dog on the butt one time too many!!
The one I have now has excaped twice, and ended up 15 miles away!!! I see you're in Sauk Co., I'm in Columbia Co. You might have seen him on the front page of the Portage paper the second time he excaped. He got his picture in the Madison paper and channel 15 news as well.
He's a hoot, but I do love him!!! Don't know if I'd want more than one though!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
387 Posts
At one time a few years ago we had 47 emus, we did everything correctly, didn't lose much over a 2 1/2 year span, butchered a bunch, had the fat rendered, etc. Well long story we found we preferred the meat ground up for burgers, meatloaf etc. We attended seminars, and tried to learn everything possible. When a bird escapes it gets real interesting. they can be moved with a leash takes practice tho. we gave our last 3 away a couple of years ago and I admit I was glad to see them go. Feel free to PM any questions.. Andy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
318 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
FreeRanger said:
Paul,
Forget about emus. BUY MY SHEEP! I have health problems and must unload my two small flocks. I have six commercial grade ewes and an unrelated Texel cross ram that I am trying to place. I also have five registered Shetland ewes and an unrelated ram for sale. I also have three Shetland ewe-lambs I am selling for $100/each; one black, one white and one light grey with spots.

There is money in direct marketing grass-fed lamb. I have more buyers than I can meet in Madison. I am only getting out of the business due to health reasons that I can't over come. I am located in Green County.

Sorry for the sale pitch folks but I just have to get rid of these sheep. I don't want to but will for the sake of my family.
That might be a good idea. I already own a border collie. ;-)

Send me a PM and I might be interested. Green Co. is probably 1 1/2 hours away. I haven't had a Limburger, Braunschweiger & onion sandwich at Baumgartner's in a couple of years so it may be worth the drive. I might even wash that down with a cold Huber while I am at it.
 

·
Keeping the Dream Alive
Joined
·
1,270 Posts
pancho said:
The best way to start emu raising is to start with a load of money. Raise emus until you go broke, won't take long.
LOL

Pancho, you reminded me of a joke told down here:

Q: How do you build a successful small business in Australia?

A: Start with a successful big business.
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top