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This was a pretty good kit for the price just put one in your hiking pack, BOB , glovebox etc


 

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I just want to know why every "kit" I see like this has ONE Bandaid...what are you going to do with one Bandaid?
 

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I just want to know why every "kit" I see like this has ONE Bandaid...what are you going to do with one Bandaid?
I recently had a real life emergency involving a chainsaw and badly bleeding leg and I can tell you a feminine hygiene pad with compression bandage was much more useful than 1 bandaid.
 

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I recently had a real life emergency involving a chainsaw and badly bleeding leg and I can tell you a feminine hygiene pad with compression bandage was much more useful than 1 bandaid.
In the Marines, way back before injectable surgical sponges, sealing field dressings with clotting agents, 'Quick Clot' etc...
There was a brand of tampons without deodorant, no fragrances, and came in a plastic sealed package.
We always had a few to seal bullet entry wounds,
And the regular big sanitary napkin with the tie ends on them, for the exit wounds.
The little 'Field Dressing' wasn't good for much more than holding a sanitary napkin in place...

Plain white paper towels work real good,
Bleached paper is virtually sterile (bleach), and with no inks they weren't likely to cause problems.

Everyone had water proof duct tape (sticks under water) wrapped around flashlights, canteens, foot powder containers or something, seals sucking chest wounds, works pretty good in spurting head wounds also.
Mostly used to seal up leaks when it rains, but comes in handy for emergency treatment too.

Surgical towel clamps are small, light, have huge jaws and will pull a wound closed so it can be taped or stitched...


Most of us carried these with the tourniquet since you can close a wound real quick and get stitches/tape/glue on it later.
I suggest sharpening the points, some come pretty dull, and since you have to punch those points through skin, sharp is good because skin is tough.
Punches holes for heavy needles/field stitches later.

Someone, usually 2 or 3 carried a bottle of Betadine to disinfect/flush wounds.
Doesn't make you scream, kills all nasties you are likely to get in the brush, doesn't weigh that much, and is cheap/seriously effective, never expires.
I left the seal under the cap, switched to a squirt bottle cap (like water bottles have) so I can power flush wounds by squeezing the bottle.

The load out between basic military, and field guys differs greatly,
Normal military don't carry a tourniquet on their load bearing straps or in our case, taped/banded to the rifle.
Straps if you don't have a retaining sling on the rifle, when you can't lose the rifle, on the rifle.

For civilians, the woven cloth belt with sliding cinch buckle makes an easy tourniquet, rather than a leather belt with holes/tongue buckle.

It doesn't have to be expensive, big/heavy, single purpose/proprietary, etc to make a big difference.

As to the band-aid thing, with duct tape on a handle, paper towels or snot sock, the field bandage is covered from small to quite large.

Not that the 'Average' guy would think about it, but plastic tubing on our dog tag chains.
Made a straw when you were trying to suck up shallow water, get a drink without movement, worked as a chest tube to keep lungs from collapsing (pneumothorax), drainage in deep gut wounds, etc.
Better to fight a potential infection later than bleed out or suffocate now...

Just a historical foot note,
The big, silk bandanas worn my military, explorers, cowboys, travelers in general weren't a 'Fashion Statement'.
Silk stops bleeding, filters water, is stupid strong so it works as a tourniquet, a sling, a brace/attachment for splints, binds/supports broken fingers, ankles, wrists...
Works on your head to keep sunburn off neck, ears, etc.
They were used over the face to keep snow blindness from happening.
Used under packs, it keeps chafing/blisters to a minimum.
It's that one thing about every expedition/expeditionary forces had in common...
 

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Always carried a couple sanitary napkins of different thicknesses in my animal first aid kit.....That along with vet wrap... Bandaids? Forgeddabout them.
 

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In the Marines, way back before injectable surgical sponges, sealing field dressings with clotting agents, 'Quick Clot' etc...
There was a brand of tampons without deodorant, no fragrances, and came in a plastic sealed package.
We always had a few to seal bullet entry wounds,
And the regular big sanitary napkin with the tie ends on them, for the exit wounds.
The little 'Field Dressing' wasn't good for much more than holding a sanitary napkin in place...

Plain white paper towels work real good,
Bleached paper is virtually sterile (bleach), and with no inks they weren't likely to cause problems.

Everyone had water proof duct tape (sticks under water) wrapped around flashlights, canteens, foot powder containers or something, seals sucking chest wounds, works pretty good in spurting head wounds also.
Mostly used to seal up leaks when it rains, but comes in handy for emergency treatment too.

Surgical towel clamps are small, light, have huge jaws and will pull a wound closed so it can be taped or stitched...


Most of us carried these with the tourniquet since you can close a wound real quick and get stitches/tape/glue on it later.
I suggest sharpening the points, some come pretty dull, and since you have to punch those points through skin, sharp is good because skin is tough.
Punches holes for heavy needles/field stitches later.

Someone, usually 2 or 3 carried a bottle of Betadine to disinfect/flush wounds.
Doesn't make you scream, kills all nasties you are likely to get in the brush, doesn't weigh that much, and is cheap/seriously effective, never expires.
I left the seal under the cap, switched to a squirt bottle cap (like water bottles have) so I can power flush wounds by squeezing the bottle.

The load out between basic military, and field guys differs greatly,
Normal military don't carry a tourniquet on their load bearing straps or in our case, taped/banded to the rifle.
Straps if you don't have a retaining sling on the rifle, when you can't lose the rifle, on the rifle.

For civilians, the woven cloth belt with sliding cinch buckle makes an easy tourniquet, rather than a leather belt with holes/tongue buckle.

It doesn't have to be expensive, big/heavy, single purpose/proprietary, etc to make a big difference.

As to the band-aid thing, with duct tape on a handle, paper towels or snot sock, the field bandage is covered from small to quite large.

Not that the 'Average' guy would think about it, but plastic tubing on our dog tag chains.
Made a straw when you were trying to suck up shallow water, get a drink without movement, worked as a chest tube to keep lungs from collapsing (pneumothorax), drainage in deep gut wounds, etc.
Better to fight a potential infection later than bleed out or suffocate now...

Just a historical foot note,
The big, silk bandanas worn my military, explorers, cowboys, travelers in general weren't a 'Fashion Statement'.
Silk stops bleeding, filters water, is stupid strong so it works as a tourniquet, a sling, a brace/attachment for splints, binds/supports broken fingers, ankles, wrists...
Works on your head to keep sunburn off neck, ears, etc.
They were used over the face to keep snow blindness from happening.
Used under packs, it keeps chafing/blisters to a minimum.
It's that one thing about every expedition/expeditionary forces had in common...
JH you just taught me a bunch I didn't know. Definitely have a new appreciation for silk!
 

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JH you just taught me a bunch I didn't know. Definitely have a new appreciation for silk!
Welcome to it if you can use it.

The ultra tight weave of fine silk makes an excellent filter.
Membrane based water filters are based on silk filters used before synthetics were invented.
Old time expeditions used them to filter out cysts, polyps of parasites from water.
The weave won't stop a virus, but it will even filter some bacteria if the weave is fine enough.

While it's a long way from 'Best', silk was used before synthetics as an electrical insulator.
I found some very old high voltage coils with silk as insulation, and that sent me off to the library for research...
When I had military training, silk was listed as an improvised electrical insulator when nothing else was available.

The first heart/lung blood processing machines used silk filters for some part of that process, but I'm not a doctor so I didn't understand what I read about that...
Silk was the standard thread for medical stitches for at least 900 years, but again, not a doctor so I can't tell you why.
China realized the value of silk long before anyone else, and trying to smuggle silk worms out of the country was an automatic death sentence.

For over 6,000 years military grunts were issued silk as parts of their uniforms.
It started in China at least 6,000 years ago, graves dating back 6,000 years show silk as part of those uniforms,

And after silk reached Europe, the Greeks & Romans issued silk as an essential part of field uniforms.
The Spartans issued silk as passage right from childhood/training into military service, being incredibly costly it wasn't wasted on the masses and was illegal for anyone but military to display.

Napoleon had silk issued to all his battle troops, and for the reasons listed.

Every military issued silk sashes for sword/handgun holders until flap holsters came along.
Belts/belt loops/pockets weren't common in pants until around the time of the American 'Civil' war, silk was the least likely to break and let you loose your weapons.

In the US war between states (nothing 'Civil' about war) the US Calvary troops were issued large silk neck kerchiefs in a yellow color,
Calvary troops were fast strike, and often times had to treat wounds on horseback...
Those yellow kerchiefs are the basis for "Yellow Stripe" or "Yellow Belly" insults, but they kept a lot of troops alive & healthy, since they also had to treat their horses!
Bayonet or sword slashes, bullet wounds, etc, the kerchief had to be big enough to bind up and stop bleeding on the horse as well as the rider.

Silk was part of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Forces up into Vietnam war.
While it saved lives in the field, it was also worn afterwards saying 'Been There, Done That' on uniforms instead of campaign medals.
("IN COUNTRY" campaign medals are like the "Participant" ribbons today, they in no way signify someone saw combat, while the silk wasn't issued to anyone that wasn't headed for the fighting front).

Silk arm cords and hat bands are still issued to military folks, but I can't say why they get them in other branches of the service. The silk is a nod to days past.

When I read an account of a mountain man trading post (trading for furs) one of the things they brought to trade was silk, the mountain men considered silk essential.
Another tid-bit is silk was the first material put on the essential war materials list in the run up to WWII, so essential that research into a synthetic silk produced Nylon.
Japan's invasion of China cut off large scale silk supplies to the UK & US, and that created havoc with war materials production.

It's just one of those little actual history things you don't get taught in school,
And I'm not aware of anyone writing a book on the subject, but it's just details I picked up along this 60 year journey, and I found it interesting...
But then again, most people consider that 'Weird'.
 

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Many soldiers were paid in salt & 'wine' (not the wine we think of today).
The saying "Not worth his weight in salt" comes from being paid in salt.

Soldiers, mountain men, etc used to save the last of their salt for wounds, making mouth washes (no real dental care back then, lots of gum problems & sore throats),
Salt helps kill off infections, so the last was saved for that purpose.

Boiled honey has been used for centuries to treat wounds, promotes blood clotting, has anti-biotic properties, dries to cover the wound.
Boiling makes it sterile and concentrates it so it says where you put it.

'Super Glue' (two different base formulas, make sure you get the correct type) was developed to close artery cuts in extreme cold weather, and for expedient closures in emergency treatment.
While I'm not likely to try and close an artery, I have glued one side of a bandage to an open wound, pulled the wound closed, and glued the other side down before applying compression bandage,
And when you cut yourself with a sharp knife, clean cut, I've directly glued those cuts closed and they healed quite well.
Medical 'Super Glues' are made from "Cyanoacrylate".

I see the 'Emergency' kits have surgical sutures in them, and some just have a needle and thread, and let me tell you putting stitches in is difficult at best, and takes real skill and practice to do even remotely effectively.
I see the staple guns, sterile sealed packages, for cheap, and that makes a BUNCH more sense than trying to manage a needle & thread!
Keep in mind there is a very good chance your 'Patient' is going to be squirming around...
(I have fumbling farmer sausage fingers and I'm no seamstress or doctor, something with a big handle and puts the suture in with one squeeze suits me better!)

Just some thoughts on the subject, use them if you can...
 
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